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-   -   music theory books/lessons (http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1575842)

kerdeh 12-01-2012 09:06 PM

music theory books/lessons
 
Should we have a thread discussing the best music theory books and online resources? I would love to. Anyone want to suggest some good music theory books?

johnyere 12-03-2012 12:08 AM

my guitar teacher told me to get berklee's modern method for guitar...

AeolianWolf 12-03-2012 12:44 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by johnyere
my guitar teacher told me to get berklee's modern method for guitar...


an excellent suggestion -- i second it.

kerdeh 12-08-2012 03:22 AM

awesome! I'll have to look into that. When I was studying music theory in school we used the practice of harmony, 5th edition. Its really in depth as far as understanding most music theory. The only thing I can think of that isn't in that book is understanding and using modes.

Sorry, I probably should have put this suggestion in my original post.

AeolianWolf 12-08-2012 03:34 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by kerdeh
awesome! I'll have to look into that. When I was studying music theory in school we used the practice of harmony, 5th edition. Its really in depth as far as understanding most music theory. The only thing I can think of that isn't in that book is understanding and using modes.


i wonder why.

it isn't guitar oriented, but personally my favorite theory textbook is the complete musician by steven laitz.

i've also heard tonal harmony by payne and kostka to be an excellent resource, but i've never browsed through it personally.

rockingamer2 12-08-2012 03:45 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by kerdeh
awesome! I'll have to look into that. When I was studying music theory in school we used the practice of harmony, 5th edition. Its really in depth as far as understanding most music theory. The only thing I can think of that isn't in that book is understanding and using modes.

Sorry, I probably should have put this suggestion in my original post.

This is because you don't need modes.
There is a method of organizing the fretboard that uses the the names of modes to make things easier to remember, but unless you're going into advanced jazz soloing, they will only confuse you. But even then, you will have to have a solid understanding of music theory anyway.


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