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-   -   Noise when using power supply for pedal (http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1577305)

buzz12586 12-10-2012 04:14 PM

Noise when using power supply for pedal
 
I just picked up a Boss DS-1 recently as my first pedal. It seems to go through batteries pretty quickly so I picked up a power supply from Radio Shack. When I power it with the power supply it has very noticeable noise when activated, when I just use the battery it is fine.

Is the "official" power supply any better? Do I need a surge protector with some sort of filter?

Blktiger0 12-10-2012 04:22 PM

Have you tried it in different outlets?

buzz12586 12-10-2012 04:33 PM

Not yet. It is currently in the socket next to the one my amp is in (same panel)

Blktiger0 12-10-2012 04:47 PM

Try using it in a different socket while keeping your amp in that same one if you can.

Cathbard 12-10-2012 05:35 PM

Do you have a tuner that will read off frequency? If the hum is 120Hz (close to a B2) then you are looking at poor filtering in the supply. If you have an android phone install gstrings, it should be able to tell you what it is. My guess is that it's just a cheaply made supply with crappy filtering and no regulation.

trashedlostfdup 12-10-2012 11:39 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cathbard
Do you have a tuner that will read off frequency? If the hum is 120Hz (close to a B2) then you are looking at poor filtering in the supply. If you have an android phone install gstrings, it should be able to tell you what it is. My guess is that it's just a cheaply made supply with crappy filtering and no regulation.


i don't know where the OP is from but that would be 60hz in the states, right??? that would be a B1

CodeMonk 12-11-2012 12:28 AM

Radioshack power supplies have piss poor filtering IME.
I mean REALLY PISS POOR filtering. Don't ever use them for effects.
Get something made for effects. Like a Visual Sound 1 Spot.

losing battle 12-11-2012 12:49 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by CodeMonk
Radioshack power supplies have piss poor filtering IME.
I mean REALLY PISS POOR filtering. Don't ever use them for effects.
Get something made for effects. Like a Visual Sound 1 Spot.

This, I had one way back when they hum like mother****ers.

R45VT 12-11-2012 01:24 AM

Pick up a 1 spot. Cheap and has much better filtering.

Best bang for you $$

trashedlostfdup 12-11-2012 01:36 AM

i too bought a radio shack adapter and it is IMO un-usable.

+1 for a 1 spot.

Cathbard 12-11-2012 04:01 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by trashedlostfdup
i don't know where the OP is from but that would be 60hz in the states, right??? that would be a B1

Once rectified the frequency doubles to 120Hz (unless it's REALLY shitty and only half waved rectified). If it's 60 Hz it isn't poor filtering, it's interference from outside sources.

buzz12586 12-11-2012 09:54 AM

Thanks for the tips. I'm returning the Radio Shack power supply and I ordered a Dunlop ECB003 made for pedals.

trashedlostfdup 12-12-2012 12:54 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cathbard
Once rectified the frequency doubles to 120Hz (unless it's REALLY shitty and only half waved rectified). If it's 60 Hz it isn't poor filtering, it's interference from outside sources.


interesting. the [faulty] reasoning is that the US is 120w and 60hz, and i know its different in different countries (IIRC 240V in some places in Europe) i didn't know if that was it.

but if it is doubling the frequency, where does the "60 cycle hum" come in?

just wanting to learn. :cheers:

Cathbard 12-12-2012 12:57 AM

60Hz hum is coming from shit induced from the mains which is 60Hz (there, 50Hz here). Once it passes through a full wave rectifier it turns into 120Hz. That's how you can be sure if the hum is coming from the DC supply. If it's 120Hz it's from after the rectifier, if it's 60Hz it's coming from before the rectifier.

Eppicurt 12-12-2012 12:58 AM

Yup, +1 to all suggested for a new power supply. Having a power supply with a noise suppressor is essential. It's amazing how much cheap power supplies can create noise.

Cathbard 12-12-2012 01:01 AM

That's why I always build my own DC supplies. It's the only way I can be sure that everything is kosher. If I make it I can be certain there will be no audible 100Hz hum. The crap I've seen in a lot of commercially made DC supplies makes me want to :puke:

Eppicurt 12-12-2012 01:03 AM

It's pretty much forced me to sell some stuff to afford an Iso power supply. I've been using a behringer PSA for about 5 years now. :haha:

Cathbard 12-12-2012 01:05 AM

There's not much to a power supply. I started building them when I was 14 yo. LM317T - that's the ticket. You should give it a go.

Eppicurt 12-12-2012 01:09 AM

Maybe. I'm not awful with a soldering iron, but I'm a terrible builder. Just looking around for a used ISO 5.

Cathbard 12-12-2012 01:15 AM

You may be overestimating the complexity of a power supply. Not counting the transformer and case a well regulated single output DC supply is literally 4 components if you use a LM7809 and six if you use a LM317T.


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