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-   -   How do you name chords with 2 notes? (http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1578044)

Standarduser 12-15-2012 11:25 AM

How do you name chords with 2 notes?
 
How do you name a chord that involves only 2 notes, like B seventh fret and and e seventh fret?

mdc 12-15-2012 11:47 AM

Dyad, double stop.

tyler_j 12-15-2012 12:06 PM

It's an interval. A perfect 5th, I believe.

Downfall93 12-15-2012 12:15 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by tyler_j
It's an interval. A perfect 5th, I believe.


If E is the root, it's a fifth, if b is the root it's a fourth.

chronowarp 12-15-2012 12:33 PM

Fourths and Fifths are just reflections of each other!

Also, a "power" chord, which is just a harmonic fifth interval, has an inherent major quality due to how low the Maj3 is in the overtone series. Especially when it's distorted.

at least, that's what they say.

ChucklesMginty 12-15-2012 02:15 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by chronowarp
Also, a "power" chord, which is just a harmonic fifth interval, has an inherent major quality due to how low the Maj3 is in the overtone series. Especially when it's distorted.

at least, that's what they say.


How does this work then if you're playing a minor triad?

thewoodsterix 12-15-2012 02:20 PM

E5 first inversion is probably the best "proper" name. :)

MaXiMuse 12-15-2012 02:22 PM

Chords contain at least 3 notes so it's an interval yeah.

e|-7-|
B|-7-|

is a fourth, so it's an inverted power chord.

MaXiMuse 12-15-2012 02:23 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by thewoodsterix
E5 first inversion is probably the best "proper" name. :)


I think you mean B5.

chronowarp 12-15-2012 02:32 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by ChucklesMginty
How does this work then if you're playing a minor triad?


Whatcha mean?

I think part of why a minor chord is historically "dark" or "dooming" is because of the internal dissonance of the M3 overtone w/ the root and the m3 of the chord. At least that's what Leonard Bernstein told me.

Junior#1 12-15-2012 03:29 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by MaXiMuse
I think you mean B5.

Um no. It's E5. If it were B5, then instead of E you would have F#.

Artemis Entreri 12-15-2012 03:38 PM

I prefer to call them simultaneities.

vampirelazarus 12-16-2012 12:53 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by chronowarp
Also, a "power" chord, which is just a harmonic fifth interval, has an inherent major quality due to how low the Maj3 is in the overtone series. Especially when it's distorted.

at least, that's what they say.


But...... What?

I dont think omitting the third can imply any major/minor quality. At least not if you're playing just a 1st and 5th.

I could be wrong though, it has been a long ass time since Ive been here, or anywhere near music theory.

(Seriously though, way to ****ing long.)

chronowarp 12-16-2012 02:48 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by vampirelazarus
But...... What?

I dont think omitting the third can imply any major/minor quality. At least not if you're playing just a 1st and 5th.

I could be wrong though, it has been a long ass time since Ive been here, or anywhere near music theory.

(Seriously though, way to ****ing long.)

OF course it can.
When you play a pitch you aren't just hearing the fundamental, the overtones have a significant role in how you perceive pitch. The maj3 is extremely low in the overtone series, and because of that it's much more prominent.

Overdriving a signal brings out the harmonics even more...so ya, I mean a basic power chord does have a sort of inherent major quality - not anywhere to the same effect as if you were audibly playing the third, however.

MaggaraMarine 12-16-2012 06:03 AM

What are the other instruments playing at the same time? What is played before and after it? Guitar isn't the only instrument that affects the harmony. And that fifth will become a chord when you add the other instruments. But without the other instruments and any other notes played before or after it, it's a B5.

For example the note before or after this could be D. Then it would be B minor. Or if the other instruments were playing D#, it would be B major.

And guys who are saying it's E5: Look at the first post. It says 7th fret on B string (F#) and 7th fret on E string (B).

Max Dread 12-16-2012 08:24 AM

There's a fair bit of crap being spouted in this thread, enough for me not to know where to start with it all!!!

J-Dawg158 12-16-2012 09:53 AM

Context is how you name it, like what maggaramarine was talking about in his post. Naming a chord is kind of like trying to define a word that has several different meanings. You can give a rough approximation just by looking at it, but until you see it in context it's just a guess.

Wiegenlied 12-16-2012 03:06 PM

choronowarp is absolutely correct about the M3 overtone but it is very suttle. as for the other questions in this thread, you are mostly correct in your assumptions. If you're playing a minor third along with the 1 + 5, that M3 overtone doesn't dissapear but becomes all but irrelevant, being completely overwhelmed by the harmony implied by the notes that are present. Not to mention the minor 3rd interval has overtones of its own, including the M3 which coincidentally matches the 5th of the chord now.

But wait, if each pitch has a M3 overtone, wouldnt an actual major 3rd interval have a M3 overtone, making that overtone augmnted to the root. Yup, but the major chord still is the most harmonically stable chord, and this should give you an idea of how little of an effect these overtones really have. I think what chrono was getting at was if the 3rd is omitted you the presence of the interval gains a bit of influence. And when you start getting 4+ pitches in a chord then there are so many overtones you can have notes that fall well out of the scale. Therefore, I would never assume any chord is anything else then the pitches purposely being played, anymore then I would think of each individual note as a major chord (because overtones create just that).

As for context that is another thing completly. Of course if you are in a situation where you play a double stop or 4/5 diad, you can simply analyse the key/scale and figure out what chord that could potentially be, but that still doesnt make it that chord, and there's probably a reason that note was omitted

gunsnroses#1 12-16-2012 03:25 PM

The 3rd of a chord determines whether it is major or minor. Period. You may be using only 'power chords' in a song and it sound either happy or sad, but that is due to the scale you are using, not the 'chords' themselves. Without the 3rd, they are inherently neutral.

MaggaraMarine 12-16-2012 03:42 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by gunsnroses#1
The 3rd of a chord determines whether it is major or minor. Period. You may be using only 'power chords' in a song and it sound either happy or sad, but that is due to the scale you are using, not the 'chords' themselves. Without the 3rd, they are inherently neutral.

Unless there are other instruments playing. And still if you played a chord progression with power chords only (without any other instruments), for example C5, A5, F5, G5, you would hear it as C major, A minor, F major, G major. Even if you played them as single notes, you would hear the same. Of course they could all be majors or minors. But at first you will hear the most usual progression. The chords can have a function even if they were power chords. In this case the power chords use notes C, G; A, E; F, C; G, D - that's C major scale without B. So you hear the notes in the chords before the chord and after the chord and that way you can hear the other chord tones. Also you can hear which chord is the tonic (resolution) and the other chord functions. When the power chords have a context, you can pretty much figure whether they are major or minor.


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