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-   -   Orchestral, film score (http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1581419)

Scott Jones 01-06-2013 02:45 AM

Orchestral, film score
 
Hey guys!

Just wanted to share my orchestral/film score compositions with you.

Hope you get a chance to check them out!

If you can, listen with good headphones, or through a decent system for full effect.

My main influences are Hans Zimmer, Bear McCreary, John Williams, Ravel, Jerry Goldsmith, Trent Reznor.

http://soundcloud.com/scottjonesmus...roduction-cues/

Xiaoxi 01-06-2013 03:00 AM

Hey Scott! Nice to see a professional composer here. Hope you stick around, would love to chat with you regarding film scoring. I'm aspiring to score for films as well, and am developing virtual instruments for 8Dio (www.8dio.com). Check out the Adagio strings!!! :)

I will listen to the cues tomorrow when I have access to proper monitors. But for now, cheers!

:cheers:

Scott Jones 01-06-2013 03:16 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Xiaoxi
Hey Scott! Nice to see a professional composer here. Hope you stick around, would love to chat with you regarding film scoring. I'm aspiring to score for films as well, and am developing virtual instruments for 8Dio (www.8dio.com). Check out the Adagio strings!!! :)

I will listen to the cues tomorrow when I have access to proper monitors. But for now, cheers!

:cheers:


Cool! I'd be more than happy to chat sometime about it!

Look forward to it! And I look forward to hearing from you!

mulefish 01-06-2013 05:40 AM

I hate to be off topic, but is there an 'only film scorers/composers thread' or anything?

I'd love to lurk it if one exists :p:

GoldenGuitar 01-06-2013 08:50 AM

Hey Scott, I heard only a couple minutes of your orchestral/film score set and I'd like to say your mixes sound great! It would be good if I could ask you for some advice in regards to mixing and production techniques in the future. :)

Scott Jones 01-06-2013 10:41 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by mulefish
I hate to be off topic, but is there an 'only film scorers/composers thread' or anything?

I'd love to lurk it if one exists :p:


Ha!

I was hoping the same thing! One must create the reality one wants! ;)

Scott Jones 01-06-2013 10:42 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by GoldenGuitar
Hey Scott, I heard only a couple minutes of your orchestral/film score set and I'd like to say your mixes sound great! It would be good if I could ask you for some advice in regards to mixing and production techniques in the future. :)


Thanks man!

I'd be more than happy to answer any questions you may have!

Hail 01-06-2013 10:48 AM

are you the guy that made chacha

can't you use that to see how it is, we suck and are lazy and especially we suck

Scott Jones 01-06-2013 11:09 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hail
are you the guy that made chacha

can't you use that to see how it is, we suck and are lazy and especially we suck


You are hilarious fun!

Have an awesome day!

Hail 01-06-2013 11:28 AM

i actually like you in this thread it's okay that's why i was being self deprecating i'll listen to it when i wake up most likely thanks bud

Xiaoxi 01-09-2013 02:23 AM

Hey Scott, finally had a chance to listen to your cues. Very nice! I definitely hear a lot of Bear McCreary in the action cues. "Symphonic Poem" has some really great moments.

A few questions:
1. What's your approach to scoring?
2. What libraries/synths/digital tools do you use?

GoldenGuitar 01-09-2013 03:27 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Xiaoxi
2. What libraries/synths/digital tools do you use?


I'm going to add to your question Xiaoxi, if you don't mind. :)
Scott, I've noticed in your scores that you stuck mostly to traditional instruments and timbres, but I've realised many film composers use disntictly different sounds. Do you know how they aquire these? Are they samplers the composers build themselves or are there already available libraries?

Xiaoxi 01-09-2013 03:43 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by GoldenGuitar
I'm going to add to your question Xiaoxi, if you don't mind. :)
Scott, I've noticed in your scores that you stuck mostly to traditional instruments and timbres, but I've realised many film composers use disntictly different sounds. Do you know how they aquire these? Are they samplers the composers build themselves or are there already available libraries?

I feel like I can answer this question lol

Basically, all of the above. People take every kind of approach imaginable...it all depends on the artist.

Composers like Randy Newman/John Williams, use straight up orchestral scoring...they take the old school approach with pen & paper, no digital sequencing necessary.

Then there's the "new school" of sound design driven scoring like Diego Stocco and Gotye. They record acoustic sources of sound and craft new sound from them using many synth tools and DSPs. Also Jason Graves, who sampled his own orchestra filled with nothing but extended techniques & articulations.

There's the "epic score/trailer music" style from Hans Zimmer (and lots of interns), Two Steps from Hell, Bear McCreary, etc who uses a mix of traditional orchestral samples (sometimes transferred to the real thing) combined with a slew of commercial sound design libraries and synths which have pre-made sounds, grooves, etc. For TV composers who are always pressed for time, this is the most common approach.

Lastly there are many electronica specialists who design their own synth patches, either analog or digital. This is mostly just expertly knowing their way around synths and how to create new, interesting timbre/effects from them.

Most composers are aware of all these approaches and take bits and pieces from all possibilities.

GoldenGuitar 01-09-2013 04:03 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Xiaoxi
Also Jason Graves, who sampled his own orchestra filled with nothing but extended techniques & articulations.

Orchestra full of extended techniques.. I want that! The problem with my scoring these days is my lack of available timbres. And since I mostly think in timbres textures and gestures, it limits what I can do due to my lack of skill.

Xiaoxi, do you have any suggestions on any good sampler packs and Synths? Also what's your workflow like? (software, synths, how you score)
I use a mixture of Sibelius 6 and Abelton and I have a Classical Guitar and Prepared guitar sampler I made for uni. Which isn't exactly very effiecient...

Scott Jones 01-09-2013 08:19 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Xiaoxi
Hey Scott, finally had a chance to listen to your cues. Very nice! I definitely hear a lot of Bear McCreary in the action cues. "Symphonic Poem" has some really great moments.

A few questions:
1. What's your approach to scoring?
2. What libraries/synths/digital tools do you use?


Hey man! Cool! Glad you had a chance to listen! Thanks for doing that!

Second question first.... I record in Logic Pro and my virtual libraries include:
East West Quantum Leap's Symphonic Gold (Orchestral); Symphonic Choirs; Voices of Passion; Storm Drum 2; Ministry of Rock (Rock instruments library-though i RARELY use it) and RA (a world instrument library). And: Spectrasonics' Omnisphere and Stylus RMX (with Bonus Spectrasonics, Burning Grooves and Funk City, among the extras within Stylus). As well as, a ton of sounds that come WITH Logic, Found Percussion and some others I can't recall right now.

First question.... my approach varies from cue to cue. Since much of the stuff I write doesn't ever require or call for a real orchestra (due to MY budget and location, the client's budget-if I lived in LA, perhaps there would be more replacing or enhancing), since that usually isn't the case, I typically compose by playing parts in, layering them as I hear them, rather than scoring everything out on paper or in a notation program. Not that I can't do it that way, I do when it's necessary, but for me, (and I am NOT old school with the scoring out on paper approach), for me, I like to perform the parts in, hear them back, and orchestrate them according to how I am hearing it. It is also much quicker for me to write this way, rather writing the parts out first, then having to play them in, then having to tweak them if something going to recording wasn't like I'd heard it in my head, which then would mean my going back and changing the score as well.

I HAVE been commissioned to write pieces that will be performed live, in which case i STILL perform it all in first, and THEN I go back into my session, isolate each part and score it out, creating the typical full score and individual parts in Finale.

Last year I wrote a huge Christmas Overture, where, the client wanted to their orchestra to perform WITH my tracks. They simply had a limited orchestra, but wanted it to sound huge anyway. So, I wrote the full piece (playing the parts in first), ignoring what instruments they had, and when finished, went back in, scored out parts according to THEIR instrumentation, left the rest alone, and it went really well. They simply played with the track, it sounded huge, but with live instruments over the top, it sounded completely natural.

I've written for massive percussion ensemble shows where there was literally 50-200 percussion instruments on stage and NO room for any kind of orchestra, so I tracked everything, (including the perc instruments-taiko drums, gongs, bells, etc) and they performed with the track LIVE, playing the perc parts over the track, which sounded HUGE. (I actually have video of these shows)

Anyway..... hope that answers the questions you had.

Scott Jones 01-09-2013 08:32 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by GoldenGuitar
I'm going to add to your question Xiaoxi, if you don't mind. :)
Scott, I've noticed in your scores that you stuck mostly to traditional instruments and timbres, but I've realised many film composers use disntictly different sounds. Do you know how they aquire these? Are they samplers the composers build themselves or are there already available libraries?


Hey bro! Thanks for listening!

Well, it depends on how much of my stuff you listened to. I DO incorporate a lot of non-traditional instruments and timbres into my scores, but it all depends on what I'm trying to achieve.

However, that said, I OFTEN will take traditional sounds and mess with them. Some of my cues are intentionally, entirely, ALL derived from standard orchestral sounds, but I tweak THEM out, so the core of the soundscape IS traditional, but secretly, not really.

Now, again depending on how far you got in listening to my cues, I DO incorporate TONS of weird electronica sounds, world instruments, odd textures, just not all the time.

My origins are in Debussy, Ravel, Holst, John Williams... so I have a deep love for the traditional, but unique, orchestral style in their writing, but, I also love Bear McCreary's use of massive world percussion, Hans Zimmer's use of electronica, etc... so I try and build cues with a balance of both worlds...

As far as how the sounds are acquired, their are simply a HUGE amount of libraries out there now. Hans Zimmer, creates MUCH of his odd textures with a crazy amount of old school electronic instruments he has in his studio.

Much of the time, I'll take an existing sound, available in a library and edit it myself, to make it unique to what I want.

Xiaoxi 01-09-2013 01:19 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott Jones
Second question first.... I record in Logic Pro and my virtual libraries include:
East West Quantum Leap's Symphonic Gold (Orchestral); Symphonic Choirs; Voices of Passion; Storm Drum 2; Ministry of Rock (Rock instruments library-though i RARELY use it) and RA (a world instrument library). And: Spectrasonics' Omnisphere and Stylus RMX (with Bonus Spectrasonics, Burning Grooves and Funk City, among the extras within Stylus). As well as, a ton of sounds that come WITH Logic, Found Percussion and some others I can't recall right now.
That's cool. I've got Omnisphere and RMX as well. Gonna start using it a lot more while I start to get into trailer music. Really not a fan of EastWest though :p:
Do you ever design or sample your own sounds?

Quote:
First question.... my approach varies from cue to cue. Since much of the stuff I write doesn't ever require or call for a real orchestra (due to MY budget and location, the client's budget-if I lived in LA, perhaps there would be more replacing or enhancing), since that usually isn't the case, I typically compose by playing parts in, layering them as I hear them, rather than scoring everything out on paper or in a notation program.

I see. But also, I guess what I meant with that question is if you have a concept/plan when you're scoring for something. Like an ad, specific film scene, the overarching tone/idea for the music of an entire film, etc. How do you decide what kind of music it needs? Do you do any spotting? Etc...

Scott Jones 01-13-2013 07:20 AM

As you know, composers and directors work closely together to decide where music will be best to serve the dramatic arc of the film as a whole or a single scene. Spotting sessions are key to the composer finding the tone. I always regard the emotional intent of a scene when writing an underscore. There may be a temp track that the director wants modeled. All in all, it's to enhance the emotional intent. That's my focus.

Xiaoxi 01-13-2013 04:05 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott Jones
As you know, composers and directors work closely together to decide where music will be best to serve the dramatic arc of the film as a whole or a single scene. Spotting sessions are key to the composer finding the tone. I always regard the emotional intent of a scene when writing an underscore. There may be a temp track that the director wants modeled. All in all, it's to enhance the emotional intent. That's my focus.

Any advice on how to get involved on a film/ad/documentary/TV project as a beginner? Since I've finished school and been busy with sample development, I've sadly let the actual film scoring side of me not be active at all. I know I should be going to film festivals, etc to meet directors, but even with that done, are there any specific strategies and preparation I should make to get into a meaningful production?

Scott Jones 03-14-2013 10:32 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Xiaoxi
Any advice on how to get involved on a film/ad/documentary/TV project as a beginner? Since I've finished school and been busy with sample development, I've sadly let the actual film scoring side of me not be active at all. I know I should be going to film festivals, etc to meet directors, but even with that done, are there any specific strategies and preparation I should make to get into a meaningful production?


Build a body of work people can experience and develop relationships with film students at colleges. If you have a decent portfolio, try and get it on a licensing site. If you are in a media town like LA, work your way into the awareness of people in the industry by networking like crazy.


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