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-   -   How do you produce a sound properly after breathing in? (http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1585959)

deaftolight 02-01-2013 02:19 PM

How do you produce a sound properly after breathing in?
 
I've been trying to sing forever. Every once in a blue moon my voice clicks into place and I can sing well, but it's short-lived, and then I can't get it back. It's quite depressing actually.

One thing I can't stand about every vocal book or lesson you read is that they always begin with teaching you how to breathe from your diaphragm, and after some breathing exercises, to sing a note or scale. It will say sing/hum/vocalize some notes in a comfortable range, assuming that you magically can do this right. Nobody ever actually tells you how to produce the sound correctly. When I try to do this, I always end up tensing my throat to make a sound come out. If I remain completely relaxed, I just hear the sound of air trying to come out. Kinda like putting your ear to a seashell, but without the actual note that you sometimes hear.

I most likely developed bad habits talking as a child from being in a loud family, which is my theory as to why I can't naturally make the connection from breathing to vocalizing without feeling like I'm tightening a bit. If anyone can help me figure out how to even just produce sound properly, I can actually work on these fundamentals and practice them rather than just constantly be blindly trying to achieve that sensation, only to lose it and not be able to get it back for months at a time.

I have taken vocal lessons in the past with different teachers, and they would have me practice exercises assuming I would eventually get it... But if you practice the wrong way, you just reinforce bad habits like straining your throat.

Doveri 02-02-2013 05:11 AM

You relax your vocal tract. To do that, sing a scale of notes using a sound such as 'eh' without moving your mouth. If you move your mouth, you did it wrong. And then you can also try singing as if you are sighing, in a totally relaxed manner.

Breathing is simple, inhale while upper abs expand, exhale-upper abs contract- phonate. When the abs deflate all the way, you've run out of good breath.

deaftolight 02-05-2013 08:35 PM

The part I get confused at is how to turn the air that you breath in into actual sound, or an actual note. Trying to produce a sound while relaxing my vocal tract either feels like just air coming out, or some other low sound that is barely audible, somewhere between maybe a vocal fry and a breathy sound, but nowhere near a note.

Sethis 02-06-2013 11:33 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by deaftolight
One thing I can't stand about every vocal book or lesson you read is that they always begin with teaching you how to breathe from your diaphragm, and after some breathing exercises, to sing a note or scale. It will say sing/hum/vocalize some notes in a comfortable range, assuming that you magically can do this right. Nobody ever actually tells you how to produce the sound correctly. When I try to do this, I always end up tensing my throat to make a sound come out. If I remain completely relaxed, I just hear the sound of air trying to come out. Kinda like putting your ear to a seashell, but without the actual note that you sometimes hear.

If you can talk then you can sing (even if that is incorrectly done). Talking is like singing low within a limited range. Don't worry about it and just do it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by deaftolight
The part I get confused at is how to turn the air that you breath in into actual sound, or an actual note. Trying to produce a sound while relaxing my vocal tract either feels like just air coming out, or some other low sound that is barely audible, somewhere between maybe a vocal fry and a breathy sound, but nowhere near a note.

That's because when they mean relax your throat they don't mean relax completely to the point you fall asleep. In reality some tension in your voice is good - straining/choking is bad.


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