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-   -   Best scale for rock music? (http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1590247)

deepfat 02-27-2013 02:47 AM

Best scale for rock music?
 
Other than the Minor Pentatonic, that is. :)

Natural Minor maybe?

reenarai602 02-27-2013 03:41 AM

he music scales that are used in Lead Rock music differ from band to band, but predominantly the pentatonic, blues, major and natural minor scales are used.

camp kanatal

Macabre_Turtle 02-27-2013 04:32 AM

Major, minor, and occassionally pentatonic, harmonic minor, and diminished, will cover nearly all music of any genre.

AlanHB 02-27-2013 04:35 AM

Lol even the spambot knew the answer to this one :haha:

Spaztikko 02-27-2013 04:44 AM

First you need to know this, very important. http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/foru...d.php?t=1564275

Archer250 02-27-2013 04:59 AM

Harmonic minor.

Hail 02-27-2013 05:37 AM

Dragon Scales!

StuartBahn 02-27-2013 06:48 AM

This really depends on the chords you're playing over.

If the underlying chords are a IV V vi progression (like a lot of Iron Maiden) then natural minor (mode 6) is the most appropriate option. If the underlying progression is centred around a V-chord then you could go with Mixolydian or, for a more bluesy option, Dorian.

These are not fixed rules but the context really makes a big difference to what works best.

AlanHB 02-27-2013 07:05 AM

(Buries head in sand)

seabear70 02-27-2013 08:43 AM

I'm thinking G Demolished.

Spaztikko 02-27-2013 08:49 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hail
Dragon Scales!


This is good. I agree with this.

Cavalcade 02-27-2013 09:09 AM

Scales are for scrubs. Pros use balances.

bondmorkret 02-27-2013 09:28 AM

Try the dorian mode, works really well over minor chord based stuff, has a little bit more edge to it than the natural minor. But really, try to mix up your scales, that will always sound coolest!

MaggaraMarine 02-27-2013 09:37 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by StuartBahn
This really depends on the chords you're playing over.

.This

Quote:
Originally Posted by StuartBahn
If the underlying chords are a IV V vi progression (like a lot of Iron Maiden) then natural minor (mode 6) is the most appropriate option. If the underlying progression is centred around a V-chord then you could go with Mixolydian or, for a more bluesy option, Dorian.

These are not fixed rules but the context really makes a big difference to what works best.

But not this. A progression can't be centered around V chord or vi chord. It's centered around the I or i chord.

Key center is always the I or i chord, that's what it means when the song is centered around a chord - it's the key center.

EmilGD 02-27-2013 10:03 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hail
Dragon Scales!

What do you recommend out of Romanian Longhorn and Swedish Short-Snout?

Cavalcade 02-27-2013 10:12 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by EmilGD
What do you recommend out of Romanian Longhorn and Swedish Short-Snout?

Try an Ancient Dragon. There should be some around the Throat of the World.

Macabre_Turtle 02-27-2013 12:12 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by StuartBahn
This really depends on the chords you're playing over.

If the underlying chords are a IV V vi progression (like a lot of Iron Maiden) then natural minor (mode 6) is the most appropriate option. If the underlying progression is centred around a V-chord then you could go with Mixolydian or, for a more bluesy option, Dorian.

These are not fixed rules but the context really makes a big difference to what works best.


This is really not a good answer to give to a beginner. If he's asking what scales he should learn after the pentatonic, you probably shouldn't expect him to understand anything about modes, or numeralled chord progressions. Also as somebody else said, it can't be 'centered around a V-chord.' No need to pretend modes are being used where they aren't.

StuartBahn 02-27-2013 10:24 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by MaggaraMarine
A progression can't be centered around V chord or vi chord. It's centered around the I or i chord.

Key center is always the I or i chord, that's what it means when the song is centered around a chord - it's the key center.


This is of course true but describing progressions from a major scale perspective is easier to understand if a person is not so far down the theory road yet.

Mister A.J. 02-27-2013 10:35 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by StuartBahn
This is of course true but describing progressions from a major scale perspective is easier to understand if a person is not so far down the theory road yet.

First off, if he's not far down the theory road, why are you talking about modes to him? Secondly, major/minor scales and modes are nowhere near the same thing, and should not even be even remotely considered as the same thing.

AeolianWolf 02-27-2013 11:13 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by StuartBahn
This is of course true but describing progressions from a major scale perspective is easier to understand if a person is not so far down the theory road yet.


so then describe it from a major scale perspective.

if you're suggesting that music that utilizes the notes in the C major scale that revolves around G as a tonic can't be considered G major, i suggest you head back to your books.

and no, guitar grimoire doesn't count.


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