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Phobophobia 06-28-2005 04:35 PM

Cadences?
 
What are some good Cadences(sp?)/progressions to go from a Major to it's relative minor?

:headbang:
Alex

Corwinoid 06-28-2005 05:23 PM

The only cadence that moves to a minor is the deceptive cadence, moving V-vi; or V/VII-vi/i (major/minor).

There are other progressions and the such that will get you there, and you can usually move directly to most closely related keys, in either major or minor form.

uberfag 06-28-2005 08:28 PM

1 Attachment(s)
hopefully this helps (sorry it looks crappy, but I suck with MSPaint) :cheers:

These are the most common cadences (only one contains the submediant*):
^Authentic (I-)V-I
^Plagal (I-)IV-I
^Deceptive (aka Interrupted) V-vi*
^Half (aka Imperfect [rarely, as it can be a misnomer in that it could be confused with a Perfect/Imperfect {Tonic in soprano/Mediant or Dominant in Soprano} Auth. or Plag. Cadence; I have seen this cadence called "Imperfect" however, on one of the older AP Music Theory tests]) (I or V/V**-)V; ends on dominant, typically preceded by a secondary dominant**

Mokumo 06-29-2005 10:15 AM

So....what's a cadence?

Captain Colon 06-29-2005 10:17 AM

The transition from tension to resolution

Corwinoid 06-29-2005 10:43 AM

^ Wrong.

A cadence is a movement that indicates tonicization.

Tonicization is the aural (by ear) identification of a tonal center; this is something completely untrained ears do, and don't realize.

They dominant chord, dom7, wants to move to the chord built a fourth above it, or a fifth below it. Why? Because naturally the dom7 can only be built on the 5th degree of the major scale. The dom7 is under tension because of the tritone, and wants to move somewhere; hearing the movement to the tonic identifies what key you're in aurally. Remove the 7th and you remove the tension, but the movement down by fifth, or its inversion, is STILL strong enough to act as a tonicizing movement; you identify this with the finally chord of the movement being the tonic that you're working with--or the root of the key.

This is so strong, that using straight major chords, the movement I-IV-V, with no movement back to I will sound incomplete to 90% of western listeners--even though they can't explain it, and there's no 7th involved.

Cadences are 2 chord movements that distinctly identify the characteristics of the key you're in.

They are:
V-I -- The authentic cadence, which is further divided by perfect and imperfect. An imperfect authentic cadence is any V-I movement where either chord is in an inversion *OR* the root of the I chord is not in the highest voicing of the final chord. A perfect authentic cadence is where both V and I are in root position, and the I has the root doubled in the highest voicing.

I-V -- The half cadence.

IV-I -- The plagal cadence.

V-vi -- The deceptive cadence. We call it deceptive because the V chord naturally wants to move back to the tonic, but moving instead to the 6th deceives the ear; the result is a strong feeling of continuation: There will be more.

IV/6-V -- The phrygian half cadence. USUALLY seen in minor keys, by putting the IV chord into its first inversion (with the 6th degree of the key in the root), the decension of the bass in motion to the fifth is by half-step. Something aurally identified as a phrygian motion (bII-i). When this occurs in a minor key it's strong enough to identify the key, based on the relationship of the b6 degree to the 5 (something almost never seen outside of minor keys).

Captain Colon 06-29-2005 11:00 AM

oh :(

Punkarse 06-29-2005 11:14 AM

I was taught that I-V is Imperfect and that V-vi is the Interrupted cadence, and they're listed as such in my old ABRSM theory books. Otherwise, I agree with Cor. Anyway, no matter. As long as it's obvious what people are talking about, terms are interchangeable.

Listening for recognisable cadences is (IMO) the surest way of determining a key in a hurry.

Mokumo 06-29-2005 11:33 AM

So cadences are chord changes with certain feelings?

Corwinoid 06-29-2005 11:38 AM

Man... no.

Cadences are chord progressions that tonicize the music. Chord progressions that identify the key, to the ear.

Phobophobia 06-29-2005 12:14 PM

Thanks people ::cheers::...I was taught all this stuff before I just needed be refreshed because it's been a long time since my teacher taught us cadences

:headbang:
Alex

Edit: Pelgal Cadence is also know as the Amen Cadence right?

uberfag 06-29-2005 12:38 PM

Quote:
Originally posted by Punkarse
I was taught that I-V is Imperfect and that V-vi is the Interrupted cadence, and they're listed as such in my old ABRSM theory books. Otherwise, I agree with Cor. Anyway, no matter. As long as it's obvious what people are talking about, terms are interchangeable.


Come to think of it, I believe you are right, I think I messed that up. Sorry! Good call though, btw! (I changed that in the original message, so now it's not misleading!)

Punkarse 06-29-2005 01:30 PM

Quote:
Originally posted by Phobophobia
Edit: Pelgal Cadence is also know as the Amen Cadence right?
It does get used a lot in 'church' music, Ja. Play an F chord, and then resolve it to C. Ta-da! :angel:

uberfag 06-29-2005 01:43 PM

If you play I-I-V-I (eight-eight-quarter-half... note durations) it kind of sounds like "Hallelujah"?...sort of...

Corwinoid 06-29-2005 02:30 PM

Generally the "Amen" thing is the Picardie third finish on a minor progression.... that is something like i-i-i-iv-V-i-iv-V-I


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