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-   -   What chords do you use with a hindu scale? (http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=869921)

newguitars08 05-27-2008 01:35 PM

What chords do you use with a hindu scale?
 
What chords do you use with a hindu scale?

Archeo Avis 05-27-2008 03:11 PM

1) If you don't know the the theory behind chord construction and the major scale inside and out, you shouldn't be worrying about the hindu scale.

2) If you knew the above mentioned concepts, you wouldn't need our help.

3) What "hindu scale"? Be more specific.

z4twenny 05-27-2008 03:24 PM

^ its the scale you learn after the catholic scale and the buddhist scale. but before the muslim scale.

seriously +1 to everything aveo said.

Veqq 05-27-2008 03:40 PM

Dude, he's asking for help on a very uncommon scale, that's not something to ostracize one for...

Is it the one with a flattened 6th and 7th?

If so...

E7b13
and
E7aug5

are your best bets, they both have all the note in the Hindu scale. The E7aug5's augmented 5th is the same as the 6b in the Hindu scale.

one vision 05-27-2008 03:49 PM

Do you mean a Raga? I think that's North Indian. Not sure though. I failed that class anyways..

Ordinary 05-27-2008 04:17 PM

you can try it over the X7 or an aug5 as Vegg suggested.

it's like a mixolian with a b6

or aerolian with a natrual or major 3rd

I saw a chord the other day from a backing track site...A7sus
So, I'm thinking just play a dominate chord less the 3rd without inserting
the 2 or 4.

if you're asking of how to construct chords from that scale.
I've asked this question before and the answer I got
was use everyother note accordingly as you would with a diatonic.

z4twenny 05-27-2008 04:28 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Veqq
Dude, he's asking for help on a very uncommon scale, that's not something to ostracize one for...


i'm not ostracizing him for asking about an uncommon scale, i'm ostracizing him for basically what archeo posted. kinda like when people say "i'm learning the bebop minor scale, how do i use it" etc, i think people should probably learn how notes interact (ie learn intervals) before they go off using crazy scales that they don't know really how to make sound good. its easier for the "student" if you learn how intervals work with each other as once you get that down you can look at any scale there is (or make up your own) and know how the notes will sound and react together. ok maybe i am ostracizing him for asking about an uncommon scale now that i look back at my post :D

i wouldn't get a chaingun if i had never shot a .22 before.

Wulver 05-27-2008 11:11 PM

Indian music isn't exactly chord-based. Typically, there's a drone behind the drums and the lead instrument in the home key of the particular song being played.

So, a song in the key of C would just have a sustained C chord behind it.

bangoodcharlote 05-27-2008 11:25 PM

With these weird scales, you'll probably not want to base an entire song or progression on it. The better option is to use the scale in place of a similar scale, such as using the A Natural Minor scale for a quick flurry of notes over an Am chord rather than Am Pentatonic.

I don't know the Hindu scale, so I can't help more than that. What are the intervals?

Ordinary 05-28-2008 03:19 AM

it's just 1,2,3,4,5,b6,b7

So it's just the natrual minor with a major 3rd

or the phyrgian major with a maj 2nd.

mixolian with b6

yeah kind of like you're saying if i was going axis pitch over whatever chord.
So a major or dominate would work just fine for me and not lean on that b6 so much.

if when over a min chord...don't lean on the major 3rd so much, or
the 3rd becomes like an option note if i wanna accent it or give it a touch
of spice.lol...just a little here and there to give it a different flavor.

Archeo Avis 05-28-2008 02:21 PM

Calling it the "hindu scale" is ridiculous, for one.
Second, to repeat myself, you are not ready to be worrying about exotic or synthetic scales. You need to focus on learning the theory behind the major scale and diatonic harmony.

Quote:
Indian music isn't exactly chord-based. Typically, there's a drone behind the drums and the lead instrument in the home key of the particular song being played.


Except that the scale isn't actually Indian, or Hindu for that matter (which makes calling it the "Hindu scale" ridiculous. This particular scale happens to be a mode of melodic minor, and is harmonically stable enough to build chord progressions (or a chord progression: iv-I). The v chord in this case will only destabilize the tonic.

Kid_Thorazine 05-28-2008 02:44 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Archeo Avis



Except that the scale isn't actually Indian, or Hindu for that matter (which makes calling it the "Hindu scale" ridiculous.

Yeah but presumably one uses it to try to replicate the sound of Indian music, which is why knowing how Indian music works (sort of because it's actually very complicated) would be helpful.

Archeo Avis 05-28-2008 02:46 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kid_Thorazine
Yeah but presumably one uses it to try to replicate the sound of Indian music, which is why knowing how Indian music works (sort of because it's actually very complicated) would be helpful.


It doesn't sound even remotely similar to "Indian music", largely because Indian music has next to nothing in common with Western music (and by extension, Western heptatonic scales and their applications)

Kid_Thorazine 05-28-2008 02:48 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Archeo Avis
It doesn't sound even remotely similar to "Indian music", largely because Indian music has next to nothing in common with Western music (and by extension, Western heptatonic scales and their applications)


yes I'm well aware of that, but it's probably the closest you can get (in terms of feel anyway) on guitar without a lot of string bending and bizzare tunings.

Ordinary 05-28-2008 04:05 PM

http://www.all-guitar-chords.com/gu...=Hindu&get2=Get

that's becuase your not playing it right.
be creative. :D
it's just an augment chord


12345abcd3 05-28-2008 05:27 PM

If it really is a hindu scale then not chords you can play on a normal guitar.

metallicafan616 05-28-2008 05:32 PM

according to my music teacher indian music uses a drone of a 3rd chord

Gordita Supreme 05-28-2008 06:09 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Archeo Avis
It doesn't sound even remotely similar to "Indian music", largely because Indian music has next to nothing in common with Western music (and by extension, Western heptatonic scales and their applications)


Yes but it's still commonly referred to as the Hindu Scale in many programs / scale books, so arguing over the name is pretty pointless. Look at it as a mode of Melodic Minor or call it Hindu Scale.

And to answer TS, yes you could make chords out of that scale.. you can make chords out of most scales.

insightUltimate 11-26-2009 02:53 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Archeo Avis
1) If you don't know the the theory behind chord construction and the major scale inside and out, you shouldn't be worrying about the hindu scale.
2) If you knew the above mentioned concepts, you wouldn't need our help.
3) What "hindu scale"? Be more specific.


It's no wonder people dishearteningly give up playing music. The arrogance of a few of the replies to this person's sincere question is a disgrace.


http://www.all-guitar-chords.com/guitar_scales.php
you can get a snapshot of what notes make up different scales, including the "Hindu" scale. You don't need a towel on your head, a सितार, a masters in music, nor micro tones to use this scale, so ignore the arrogant replies.


Start simple with a major scale to work out a base sound you are looking for in chord progressions. Then you can begin to attempt to convert those major scales to sound good behind the "Hindu" scale. You'll have to rearrange or simplify some of the notes of major scale chords. You'll find the 6 & 7th notes are flattened in the "Hindu" scale so those are the notes you should focus on. Toy around with it until you find something that sounds nice to your ears, which is what 90% of guitar players worth their salt do anyway. Who cares if anyone other than you get's it, it is your music, your time, and your guitar so most importantly, have fun while you are doing it.

http://www.all-guitar-chords.com/chord_progressions.php
Start with the major triads & work them out. You should record your efforts so you know how you are coming along, that helps allot. Also, try here:
http://www.theguitarfiles.com/guitarfile161.html

MapOfYourHead 11-26-2009 04:47 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ordinary
it's just 1,2,3,4,5,b6,b7


This is the mixolydian b6 scale, it's a mode of the melodic minor scale.

To call it the "hindu" scale is ridiculous at best.


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