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Old 05-12-2014, 08:37 PM   #21
dspellman
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ScreaminString
Well i have been thinking of purchasing a Les Paul for a while, anyone has expierience with them? What are the pros and cons?


Never heard of them.
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Old 05-12-2014, 08:39 PM   #22
dspellman
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Originally Posted by dannyalcatraz

Also, for whatever reasons, LP-style guitars tend not to have tremolos.



Well, they do, but they're all hiding, at my house, from the MLP types.

Those guys will come with the pitchforks and the torches, screaming "heresy, calumny, fellatio, flatulence!"


Last edited by dspellman : 05-12-2014 at 08:47 PM.
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Old 05-12-2014, 08:54 PM   #23
gregs1020
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sure but half of them post about which bigsby doesn't require drilling into my murphy aged historic.
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Old 05-12-2014, 09:48 PM   #24
EricChic98
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I own a Godin Freeway Classic that plays blues very well. To me, the feel of my Godin is better then a Les Paul, I love Les Paul's, but I prefer Strat and tele shapes over LP's.
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Old 05-12-2014, 10:10 PM   #25
nathan:-)
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Try a Strat and Les Paul. They've always been the standard for blues.
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Old 05-13-2014, 03:54 AM   #26
deano_l
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I think OP, you have put the cart before the horse in a big way here.

There is no "best" guitar for slow blues.

Slow blues is just blues. Blues can be played on anything. See Seasick Steve for a good example!

Slow blues - indeed all blues and any music at all - is in your fingers. You could buy Gary Moore's entire rig and still not be able to make a slow blues sound good.

It's the subtleties in how your fingers on both hands work the strings that makes blues sound good, and the make and model of guitar is irrelevant to a degree.

But a Les Paul is a good choice, and Gary Moore shows fine taste on your part as he is a brilliant blues rock player. Did you know that his Les Paul used to belong to Peter Green of Fleetwood Mac, and the pickups were wired up in an odd way when Peter sent it off for repair in the 60's.

You can get a signature Gary Moore Les Paul from Gibson for several thousand dollars. But you wont sound like Gary moore or Peter Green, not without a few years of practice.

Blues is played on many different styles of guitars from many different makes, whether they be strat shaped, tele shaped, ES-335 chaped, Les Paul shaped, or even - if you are Albert King, who Gary Moore idolised - on a Flying-Vee!

Your amp will also be important. You can't get Gary Moore's tone without a decent amp setup and playing at stage volumes. I don't know what Gary used, probably Marshalls as that is what his blues albums were recorded on - A Bluesbreaker is on the album cover. But you need to raise that in the Gear forum.

But you can get a good basic blues sound from a modelling amp or small valve amp, and you can buy a decent guitar, and you will have a sound that will work, provided you put the work in to practice.

The way to learn blues is to listen to it and try to replicate what you hear. A slow-downer will be useful to slow down and loop and little section of a track so you can figure it out and get it under your fingers. Then repreat that for a few thousand hours.

You also need to take your decent amp and decent guitar to jams and play with people so you can use those licks in context. That way you will make them your own and you will start to get your own sound. You never know, you might then want to gravitate to a different type of guitar.

Do you have a budget in mind? That will help. Do you already have an amp? Do you need to use some of your budget to buy an amp? Do you want to buy new or are you okay with used? What's your location so some of the guys can advise on used guitars in your area?

Remember to listen to influences as well, in Gary's case that would be the Kings (Albert in particular). It's funny, when I listen to Gary Moore I here SRV in their sometimes, and vice-versa. It's probably because they both ripped off Albert King's licks!
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Old 05-13-2014, 02:58 PM   #27
monwobobbo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deano_l
I think OP, you have put the cart before the horse in a big way here.

There is no "best" guitar for slow blues.

Slow blues is just blues. Blues can be played on anything. See Seasick Steve for a good example!

Slow blues - indeed all blues and any music at all - is in your fingers. You could buy Gary Moore's entire rig and still not be able to make a slow blues sound good.

It's the subtleties in how your fingers on both hands work the strings that makes blues sound good, and the make and model of guitar is irrelevant to a degree.

But a Les Paul is a good choice, and Gary Moore shows fine taste on your part as he is a brilliant blues rock player. Did you know that his Les Paul used to belong to Peter Green of Fleetwood Mac, and the pickups were wired up in an odd way when Peter sent it off for repair in the 60's.

You can get a signature Gary Moore Les Paul from Gibson for several thousand dollars. But you wont sound like Gary moore or Peter Green, not without a few years of practice.

Blues is played on many different styles of guitars from many different makes, whether they be strat shaped, tele shaped, ES-335 chaped, Les Paul shaped, or even - if you are Albert King, who Gary Moore idolised - on a Flying-Vee!

Your amp will also be important. You can't get Gary Moore's tone without a decent amp setup and playing at stage volumes. I don't know what Gary used, probably Marshalls as that is what his blues albums were recorded on - A Bluesbreaker is on the album cover. But you need to raise that in the Gear forum.

But you can get a good basic blues sound from a modelling amp or small valve amp, and you can buy a decent guitar, and you will have a sound that will work, provided you put the work in to practice.

The way to learn blues is to listen to it and try to replicate what you hear. A slow-downer will be useful to slow down and loop and little section of a track so you can figure it out and get it under your fingers. Then repreat that for a few thousand hours.

You also need to take your decent amp and decent guitar to jams and play with people so you can use those licks in context. That way you will make them your own and you will start to get your own sound. You never know, you might then want to gravitate to a different type of guitar.

Do you have a budget in mind? That will help. Do you already have an amp? Do you need to use some of your budget to buy an amp? Do you want to buy new or are you okay with used? What's your location so some of the guys can advise on used guitars in your area?

Remember to listen to influences as well, in Gary's case that would be the Kings (Albert in particular). It's funny, when I listen to Gary Moore I here SRV in their sometimes, and vice-versa. It's probably because they both ripped off Albert King's licks!


although I agree with some of this in the end not very helpful for OP. yes you can play blues on damn near any guitar and none are intrinsically better per se. on the other hand there are some tried and true favs that make a good starting point. gary like many blues players but took more than a page or two from Peter Green. Gary also played many guitars and managed blues licks on all of them. the OP never said anything about trying to cop gary's tone either just wanted suggestions for a guitar. I use a BC Rich Eagle in place of a LP but I probably wouldn't suggest it to others as a perfect blues guitar (despite the fact that I use it for blues rock).
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Old 05-13-2014, 04:01 PM   #28
deano_l
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Yep. Les Paul all day if he's into them. I play them but the Special with P90's. And a tele as well. Nowadays it's through a 15 watt Tweaker rather than the NMV AC30 at full chat like back in the day. The Blues is in the fingers and heart and soul and passion and you can be express them on Les Pauls and strats and yes even Charvels.
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