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Old 03-20-2013, 06:14 PM   #21
desperatechris
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I have met that guy in the picture Tony Denander and i have also played that guitar.

The guitar plays great and stays in tune no matter what, but it somehow feels wrong.
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Old 03-20-2013, 07:10 PM   #22
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I really don't understand these things, you have to pay a shit load of money and route out a significant part of your guitar for a non floating trem? why?

Can you easily and quickly change separate string tunings? As far as I'm concerned the main advantage of a fixed bridge is just that, otherwise whats the point?
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Old 03-20-2013, 07:59 PM   #23
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Originally Posted by Supernaut2k
I really don't understand these things, you have to pay a shit load of money and route out a significant part of your guitar for a non floating trem? why?

Can you easily and quickly change separate string tunings? As far as I'm concerned the main advantage of a fixed bridge is just that, otherwise whats the point?



Its not a trem, its a fixed bridge that holds its tune perfectly, guitar wont go out of tune when strings break in or stretch from use and so on.
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Old 03-21-2013, 03:22 AM   #24
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Hi guys, I have a google alert for Evertune because I think it's a great product. I'm an authorized installer, but have no other stake in the company other than that. I'm not a shill, I'm a fan.

They came to me a few years ago to install a few of them for their first NAMM show, and I, being a jaded luthier, was quite skeptical about a guitar that never goes out of tune. I was completely blown away by it. It worked as advertised, and set up properly, feels like a conventional guitar. Since then I've installed dozens of them, many for high profile working pros, both stage and studio, and I can tell you from personal knowledge they are being used regularly by touring artists, studio musicians, and producers.

Just to clarify, it is a fixed bridge system, it's an invasive install, and it's not cheap. The working pros who come in with more guitars to install them on are more interested in keeping in tune than saving a buck. They are also more interested in not having to worry about staying in tune for a song or a set or a recording session. I have one client who plays with a name act, and he just brought me two more guitars to install them on…PRS single cuts! I have another touring pro who loves them so much he had me install them on a Harmony and a Teisco! He loves the cheap guitars, but they never stay in tune. He also has one in a Tele and a 335.

Another great thing is that, unlike the robot style guitars, this is purely mechanical (no batteries) and keeps it in tune WHILE you are playing. On robot guitars if you go out of tune in the middle of a song, too bad. Other great features are that since each string has it's own module, if you break a string, all the others stay perfectly in tune. And when you go to put a new string on, the module is already set to the tension of that string, so all you have to do is some fine tuning and you're done. Very quick string changes.

Out of all the installs I have done I've had two people who didn't like it, and not because it didn't work properly. One guy thought it robbed tone, which may be true, but you'd have to be a real "cork sniffer" to notice. Everybody else is over the moon with it.

It's not for people who can't tune their guitars, it's for people who can't afford to have their guitars out of tune. That said, I've also installed plenty for bedroom players and non-pros.

For those who say it's an answer looking for a problem, remember how much time you spend tuning while you're recording. Between every take? Add up that time and pretend you're paying for every minute. it gets expensive.

There are some disadvantages, for example, if you like to do vibrato by moving the neck back and forth, it's not for you.

I know some of you will think I'm a shill. And I'll bet every one who does hasn't tried it for themselves. I'll say again, I'm a fan. I've seen a lot of guitar technology and it's the only product I gush about. I have a good reputation in my field and I wouldn't jeopardize that by pushing a crappy product.

Sorry about the long post, but I've tried to be thorough. I'll be happy to answer any questions you may have about it.
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Old 03-21-2013, 01:19 PM   #25
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^^ how much is it and is it possible to install in my garage
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Old 03-21-2013, 01:36 PM   #26
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Originally Posted by Acϵ♠
^^ how much is it and is it possible to install in my garage


The bridge is $330, but I don't think your garage needs an Evertune.

Seriously though, it's not an easy install, there are several templates to get for it and lots of routing, and specialized tools for an LP style install, so unless you have lots of woodworking experience and a strong eye for detail, I'd think twice about doing it yourself. If you do, I'll be happy to give you any advice you need.
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Old 03-21-2013, 02:46 PM   #27
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Hey, thanks for posting that, great to have someone who's actually worked with a few.

How do bending and vibrato work on it? As far as I can tell the mechanism is supposed to keep tension constant, so how does it work when you want a little variation in pitch?

What's maintenance like after installation? What do you have to do when changing string gauges or tunings?

The only thing I'm not sure I'm ready to believe is that the installation doesn't change the tone. Even routing out a strat cavity for a different trem changes the tone a bit. I guess I can't imagine that taking a couple of pounds of wood out to install one of these on a LP wouldn't make it sound different.
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Old 03-21-2013, 04:29 PM   #28
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Originally Posted by Roc8995
Hey, thanks for posting that, great to have someone who's actually worked with a few.

How do bending and vibrato work on it? As far as I can tell the mechanism is supposed to keep tension constant, so how does it work when you want a little variation in pitch?

What's maintenance like after installation? What do you have to do when changing string gauges or tunings?

The only thing I'm not sure I'm ready to believe is that the installation doesn't change the tone. Even routing out a strat cavity for a different trem changes the tone a bit. I guess I can't imagine that taking a couple of pounds of wood out to install one of these on a LP wouldn't make it sound different.


I'll try to explain. If the Evertune is already adjusted, when you put on a new string, it'll tune up conventionally until you get to pitch, then it'll stay the same pitch for about 4 or 5 turns. That's the "sweet spot" where the unit is active. Past that it will act conventionally again and go up in pitch. The trick is to set it up at the edge of the sweet spot, so if you don't bend or do vibrato, it's in the sweet spot, but if you bend or do vibrato, it goes out f the sweet spot. The closer to the edge of the sweet spot, the more conventional the guitar feels. I hope that's a clear explanation.

Since it adjusts to the tension of the strings, if you use the same gauge and brand, it'll tune up to within a few cents of the correct pitch and all you have to do is some fine tuning and it's right in there, so string changes are probably easier than most conventional guitars. It strings through the back like a Strat.

I haven't had too many complaints about it changing the tone, though it does a little, but probably not much different than simply playing a different guitar. Sometimes there's a tad less sustain, but I haven't had any complaints about that either. I've heard from some they have better sustain and tone, so I think it varies from guitar to guitar.

The amount of wood removed is not quite half a pound, and the unit is slightly over a pound, so it adds about a pound to most guitars.

Hope that helps.
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Old 03-21-2013, 04:35 PM   #29
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Ok, so you sort of have to get it dialed in so that it doesn't cancel out your vibrato? That makes sense. Does it just get farther from the sweet spot instead of going out of tune? So instead of being out of tune it might just be harder to pull vibrato out of it? Or is it just all in the setup?

How long would you say it takes to adjust for a new gauge of strings?
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Old 03-21-2013, 04:53 PM   #30
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From what I understand, you tune it at the bridge. Then you can turn the tuning knobs. The counter-tension springs in the bridge will prevent the tuning knobs from changing the tuning until you hit the limit. The limit where it is right on the edge of going out of tune. The perfect setting allowing for bends and vibrato. You can also have it far away from that limit. Neat for heavy-handed rhythm, but you obviously give up bends and vibrato.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?featur...xGBstjsk#t=258s

Ola demonstrates it a little. There are even better videos out there showing off how it works. And from what I've seen, restringing and setup is crazy fast. x_x

http://www.evertune.com/evertuned-guitars-for-sale-3/

The EverTune site has some guitars for pre-order. I'd be all over the MH1000-ET if it wasn't gloss black.
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Old 03-21-2013, 08:16 PM   #31
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Originally Posted by Roc8995
Ok, so you sort of have to get it dialed in so that it doesn't cancel out your vibrato? That makes sense. Does it just get farther from the sweet spot instead of going out of tune? So instead of being out of tune it might just be harder to pull vibrato out of it? Or is it just all in the setup?

How long would you say it takes to adjust for a new gauge of strings?


Actually it just gets deeper INTO the sweet spot. It should be set up at the edge of it going sharp. If the string stretches you have to bend it a little more to get to the right note or for vibrato. Like any guitar, after the strings are stretched it won't veer much. Usually good for at least a set. Any tweaks should be minor (no pun intended) to bring it up to the edge.
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Old 03-21-2013, 08:17 PM   #32
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Originally Posted by lemurflames
From what I understand, you tune it at the bridge. Then you can turn the tuning knobs. The counter-tension springs in the bridge will prevent the tuning knobs from changing the tuning until you hit the limit. The limit where it is right on the edge of going out of tune. The perfect setting allowing for bends and vibrato. You can also have it far away from that limit. Neat for heavy-handed rhythm, but you obviously give up bends and vibrato.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?featur...xGBstjsk#t=258s

Ola demonstrates it a little. There are even better videos out there showing off how it works. And from what I've seen, restringing and setup is crazy fast. x_x

http://www.evertune.com/evertuned-guitars-for-sale-3/

The EverTune site has some guitars for pre-order. I'd be all over the MH1000-ET if it wasn't gloss black.


You are correct on everything you've said.
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Old 03-21-2013, 11:51 PM   #33
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So, for dudes like me who change tunings multiple times through shows, this probably isn't the solution?
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Old 03-22-2013, 05:38 PM   #34
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ESP LTD has a couple of models with the evertune bridge one it.

http://www.yandasmusic.com/1/produc...guitar-in-black

999.00 doesn't seem to bad considering the time and money it would take to try and fit the bridge to an existing guitar.
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Old 03-22-2013, 05:39 PM   #35
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here is the MH

http://www.yandasmusic.com/ii/produ...guitar-in-black

Would be fun to try out at least.
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Old 03-27-2013, 02:34 PM   #36
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I discussed the exact same bridge idea in the early 1980s with tom scholz and came to the conclusion that musicians weren't ready to make the jump at that time.

Of course, he said the same thing about my sustainer idea.

Tom Scholz has multiple bridge patents.

It is basically 6 individual tremolos as far as function..........except it has no tremolo bar or tremolo functionality.

The reason it killed sustain to the people who tried it is because the mass of the six individual saddles needs to be about 10 times more than it currently is...........reminds me of the floyd rose copies in which the tremolo block is not nearly as heavy as the original.

The energy is dissapated by the light weight components.

Add some mass and you will get more sustain and less wear since you won't be having the string causing micromovements at the pivot points every time you pluck one.

If competent tremolo designer or someone with venture capital wants to discuss an idea that surpasses this in a huge way by including tremolo function to the mix, please PM me (I am serious).

I'm not downing the evertune totally...........I just want to find out who ventured 800 grand of venture capital on it.

This thread has re-awakened ideas first conceptualized over 30 years ago and maybe there is now money in those ideas.

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Old 01-26-2014, 07:51 PM   #37
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I got my custom Sign Guitar with an Evertune G Model tuned in drop B! This is really unbelievable! I got the guitar now one month and still not have to retune the guitar. And it feels good to play on it!

Here is a video of that guitar:

(removed)

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Old 01-26-2014, 09:45 PM   #38
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Stop necroing threads.
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Old 01-27-2014, 08:42 AM   #39
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But, in the studio, where you want tuning to be identical between tracks and songs, or when you don't want to have to set up your guitar after getting to every venue? Evertune is a pretty great solution.


That being said, there are quite a few records that are recorded a quarter step in between notes which have become to go on as very succesfull.

I noticed this years ago, so couldn't tell you exactly which ones, but there were more than I ever imagined there'd be.

I think I remember a popular pantera album and/or song as such and maybe Van Halen album. Also one song by Ac Dc I believe (TNT or highway to hell) and even a few pop songs that charted high possibly number one, where you'd expect at least 440hz related tuning.

Like I said it's been years since I noticed this, but they are definitely there.

Also heard some records had this because of speeding up in the studio, before audio warping was as sophisticated as it is today, to retune it digitally.
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