Go Back   UG Community @ Ultimate-Guitar.Com > Music > Recordings
User Name  
Password
Search:

Reply
Old 11-20-2012, 01:54 PM   #1
nileflows
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
distortion tips for this track

hey guys, im tryin to make my distorted guitars sound like alterbridge or any other alternative band where the distortion sounds really big. please give a listen to this track and give me some ideas on achieving this thing.

there are 3 guitars. 1 panned hard left and 1 in center and 1 panned hard right.

thank you !

http://soundcloud.com/farab/akhono-2

Last edited by nileflows : 11-20-2012 at 01:58 PM.
nileflows is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-20-2012, 02:34 PM   #2
ChemicalFire
King of Bacon Pancakes
 
ChemicalFire's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: The United Kingdom
Well we need to know how you're recording, what equipment you're using, what you've done to the track thus far. There is more to mixing than just recording guitars.


Also you got to remember who ever it is that is mixing Alter Bridge has way more experience and money than you.

From your track I can notice a few things

Mainly your bass is WAY too quiet, most of the beef of guitars comes from bass. Just because you can't hear it doesn't mean it's not there. Normally the bass isn't turned down low, it's just mixed as a complimentary instrument and not one on it's own.

Also the timing sounds funky to me... and not in a good way, maybe that's just me.
__________________
All I want is for everyone to go to hell...
...It's the last place I was seen before I lost myself



Quote:
Originally Posted by DisarmGoliath
You can be the deputy llamma of the recordings forum!

Last edited by ChemicalFire : 11-20-2012 at 02:37 PM.
ChemicalFire is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-20-2012, 02:49 PM   #3
nileflows
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
can you shed some light on the timing please?

and its not mixed yet.. its pretty much rough so i just wanted to have some mixing tips for the guitars.
nileflows is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-20-2012, 03:07 PM   #4
whywefight
I need loooooooo-
 
whywefight's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: I don't care where just far
He's saying the guitar playing is sloppy, which it is somewhat.
whywefight is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-20-2012, 03:29 PM   #5
ChemicalFire
King of Bacon Pancakes
 
ChemicalFire's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: The United Kingdom
Quote:
Originally Posted by nileflows
can you shed some light on the timing please?

and its not mixed yet.. its pretty much rough so i just wanted to have some mixing tips for the guitars.


It sounds off and sloppy. A lot of beef comes from good timing.

And how are you recording your distorted tone? It sounds pretty weak.
__________________
All I want is for everyone to go to hell...
...It's the last place I was seen before I lost myself



Quote:
Originally Posted by DisarmGoliath
You can be the deputy llamma of the recordings forum!
ChemicalFire is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-20-2012, 03:47 PM   #6
nileflows
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
im using podhd for the distortion. and yes, you are right about sounding weak. this is what im tryin to overcome. its been only a month i started recording so i really need some advice here. ive looked into lots of threads but no solution yet.
nileflows is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-20-2012, 06:30 PM   #7
slapfunk_101
Registered User
 
slapfunk_101's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Newfoundland-Canada
Here's some things I picked up along the way to make the guitars sound "bigger" in your recording:
First, when you record your guitars look at the waveform. Most multi-tracking recording programs I've seen show the waveforms for the different tracks. The peaks of the wave should come as close to maxing out (or clipping) as you can possibly get without it sounding too distorted.
Also, make sure you don't have too much gain or distortion on your guitar when you're recording. Use just enough to make it sound right. Heavy does not mean more distortion.
Make sure you use an equalizer to scoop out the extreme low and high frequencies. I usually cut all frequencies below 80hz and above 10mhz. The bass guitar adds most of the beefy-ness. It will fill the frequencies you just cut out of the guitar. You may need to reduce some frequencies in the guitar or bass to make room for the other.
Last but not least, I almost always double track heavy guitars and pan one almost completely left and the other right.
Hope this helps...
slapfunk_101 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-2012, 11:31 AM   #8
ChemicalFire
King of Bacon Pancakes
 
ChemicalFire's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: The United Kingdom
Quote:
Originally Posted by nileflows
im using podhd for the distortion. and yes, you are right about sounding weak. this is what im tryin to overcome. its been only a month i started recording so i really need some advice here. ive looked into lots of threads but no solution yet.


One thing I've learned over the years. Shit in, shit out. The Pod stuff has crappy pre-amps and works far better in a live situation than it does for recording. I used to use a StudioPod with PodFarm and it sounded like ass. I upgraded to an interface with better pre-amps and it sounded about a million times better.

What settings are you using on your pod? It might be possible to get something decent out of it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by slapfunk_101
Here's some things I picked up along the way to make the guitars sound "bigger" in your recording:
First, when you record your guitars look at the waveform. Most multi-tracking recording programs I've seen show the waveforms for the different tracks. The peaks of the wave should come as close to maxing out (or clipping) as you can possibly get without it sounding too distorted.


No need to do this. You used to have to because of the noise-floor of analogue recordings, but now it's far more beneficial for your waves to average around -12db. It works far FAR better when mixing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by slapfunk_101
Also, make sure you don't have too much gain or distortion on your guitar when you're recording. Use just enough to make it sound right. Heavy does not mean more distortion.


This is good advice however

Quote:
Originally Posted by slapfunk_101
Make sure you use an equalizer to scoop out the extreme low and high frequencies. I usually cut all frequencies below 80hz and above 10mhz.


Good advice poorly given. He should use his ears, no arbitrarily cut out frequencies based on numbers.

Quote:
Originally Posted by slapfunk_101
The bass guitar adds most of the beefy-ness. It will fill the frequencies you just cut out of the guitar. You may need to reduce some frequencies in the guitar or bass to make room for the other.
Last but not least, I almost always double track heavy guitars and pan one almost completely left and the other right.
Hope this helps...


He's done both of these already.
__________________
All I want is for everyone to go to hell...
...It's the last place I was seen before I lost myself



Quote:
Originally Posted by DisarmGoliath
You can be the deputy llamma of the recordings forum!

Last edited by ChemicalFire : 11-21-2012 at 11:35 AM.
ChemicalFire is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-22-2012, 06:34 AM   #9
nileflows
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
has it got something to do with Mono or Stereo ?? I've recorded all the guitars through stereo.
nileflows is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-22-2012, 08:31 AM   #10
axemanchris
Awwww.... NOW what?!
 
axemanchris's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
Believe it or not, recording in mono is what you want. You achieve the effect of stereo when you have two *different* things coming out of each of the speakers.

and +1 to the "keep the majority of the signal somewhere in the -12db zone."

CT
__________________
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Quote:
Originally Posted by firehawk
Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
axemanchris is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-22-2012, 12:23 PM   #11
slapfunk_101
Registered User
 
slapfunk_101's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Newfoundland-Canada
it is beneficial to record tracks to around -12db? I am surprised by that... somehow things don't seem to "move enough air" when they peak that low. Of course, i'm not a professional or anything, so I must try this next time I record.

Also, I should have been more specific: there is no hard set way to equalize a guitar to make it sound good. What I mean is that often it sounds best to roll off around those frequencies in my experience since they are not often necessary or produce unwanted sounds such as boominess or too much sizzle. Every case will be different and there is no hard set formula so use your ears!
slapfunk_101 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-22-2012, 02:09 PM   #12
ChemicalFire
King of Bacon Pancakes
 
ChemicalFire's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: The United Kingdom
Quote:
Originally Posted by slapfunk_101
it is beneficial to record tracks to around -12db? I am surprised by that... somehow things don't seem to "move enough air" when they peak that low. Of course, i'm not a professional or anything, so I must try this next time I record.


Move what air? If you mean through monitors/headphones, just turn the Master volume up and if you mean when you come to export your songs for release then you really need to look into mastering.

You can have your amp up loud no problem, but there is NO reason to have high volumes in mixing. It just means you have 0 head room and no way of fixing it. Most people, my self included just use channel strip plugs to turn the gain down pre-fader cuz it'd very hard to get a -12db average without something like that.
__________________
All I want is for everyone to go to hell...
...It's the last place I was seen before I lost myself



Quote:
Originally Posted by DisarmGoliath
You can be the deputy llamma of the recordings forum!
ChemicalFire is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 02:03 AM.

Forum Archives / About / Terms of Use / Advertise / Contact / Ultimate-Guitar.Com © 2014
Powered by: vBulletin Version 3.0.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.