Go Back   UG Community @ Ultimate-Guitar.Com > Music > Musician Talk > Singing & Vocals
User Name  
Password
Search:

Reply
Old 04-30-2013, 04:47 PM   #401
Sickz
Jazz Musician
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Not sure about the fry on the A1. The C2 can be heard with an acoustic guitar though, for sure.
__________________
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote:
Originally Posted by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
Sickz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-30-2013, 06:53 PM   #402
Sethis
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
That's nice then. I haven't heard a lot of people who can do that. Especially if it's loud as you say. You could be a bass or something but chances are that you're a bass baritone.

Last edited by Sethis : 04-30-2013 at 06:57 PM.
Sethis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-2013, 09:58 PM   #403
Derek67ca
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
um... i'm 45 years old, and I think I just discovered that I am a low bass. I think I am C2-G3 but i'm struggling to believe it.

I got tired of not being able to sing any popular songs, and I'm trying to find out my range. I followed the instructions on a youtube range finder video, but it doesnt go low enough - stops at E2. So im thinking I must be singing an octave higher. I downloaded a Voice Training app that plots your voice through the mic onto the display and shows you the note you are singing, but it also doesnt go low enough. It did, however, show that i am indeed able to extend lower than an E2. on the high end, G3 is barely comfortable.

Maybe I would be a really good opera singer. I could dig that. C2 is rare enough to be of value, yes?

Derek
Derek67ca is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-06-2013, 03:35 AM   #404
Tyson2011
Registered User
 
Tyson2011's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: North Dakota
Quote:
Originally Posted by Derek67ca
um... i'm 45 years old, and I think I just discovered that I am a low bass. I think I am C2-G3 but i'm struggling to believe it.

I got tired of not being able to sing any popular songs, and I'm trying to find out my range. I followed the instructions on a youtube range finder video, but it doesnt go low enough - stops at E2. So im thinking I must be singing an octave higher. I downloaded a Voice Training app that plots your voice through the mic onto the display and shows you the note you are singing, but it also doesnt go low enough. It did, however, show that i am indeed able to extend lower than an E2. on the high end, G3 is barely comfortable.

Maybe I would be a really good opera singer. I could dig that. C2 is rare enough to be of value, yes?

Derek



While low basses are rare, they aren't unheard of...in my choir of 67 people, There are 4 basses which can get the low C

Opera has nothing to do with range, their are rolls for every vocal fach.
Tyson2011 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-03-2013, 11:35 PM   #405
Blind In 1 Ear
Git-Man
 
Blind In 1 Ear's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
so i'm wondering where one might consider me range wise. i've always thought i was a baritone, but after much practice i learned to place my voice more correct in my throat and shed weight from my voice. now i find i'm singing literally any song i want and can do a pretty good stevie wonder impression. i'm starting to wonder if i'm more of a tenor who was untrained and forced himself to be a baritone?

anyways, i'm singing 8 part harmony here, the high note i'm trying to make sound a little more female like. just a quick little thing i made to work on harmony tone for my songs. the lowest note is a bass Db2 i believe, and the highest is a Gb5.

https://soundcloud.com/tom-milley/8-part-harmony

EDIT: i decided to see if i could get a C2 as well (because of the guys above). it's not as stable as i would like, but i can get enough volume to hear it over the piano. i can also get a tenor C, and actually with little effort. i can make it sound not like a girl too like i did in the clip,. i can sing slow ride note for note, and i can sing baritone stuff and bass parts and do a pretty good bing crosby impression i've been told. so i really don't know where to consider myself. a lyric baritone?
__________________
http://www.youtube.com/user/timmy47?feature=mhee

check out my youtube page for some songs.

Last edited by Blind In 1 Ear : 07-06-2013 at 05:50 PM.
Blind In 1 Ear is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2013, 01:01 AM   #406
Tdvv
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
I'm either a baritone or a tenor... I don't really know
My lowest note I think is about B2/C3
And I think my highest note is about g4
But I don't have the best pitch...
I'm most comfortable around my higher range

And in show choir I am tenor (except one song I was baritone) but there were only 5 guys in my show choir last year,.. And there were only two tenors

But here's me singing *badly*


I really much rather be a tenor... I don't really know why
Tdvv is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2013, 09:07 AM   #407
Blind In 1 Ear
Git-Man
 
Blind In 1 Ear's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tdvv
I'm either a baritone or a tenor... I don't really know
My lowest note I think is about B2/C3
And I think my highest note is about g4
But I don't have the best pitch...
I'm most comfortable around my higher range

And in show choir I am tenor (except one song I was baritone) but there were only 5 guys in my show choir last year,.. And there were only two tenors

But here's me singing *badly*


I really much rather be a tenor... I don't really know why

from that video, i'd say you sound like an untrained tenor. listening to you tone while talking sounds like a tenor too. if you want to be a better tenor, look up vocal fry exercises. think axl rose. try to do that voice, and then work on backing off on it so you're on the edge. it really helped me open up my range and place my voice better for less effort while projecting, sustaining and singing higher without fatigue. also, your vibrato needs some work. sounds like you are making more of a tremolo effect than vibrato. in other words, like you are cutting off and on the air instead of changing the pitch. try singing a siren and then speeding it up but in one breath, not cut off between the notes making them smooth. that's more of what vibrato should be, just not as deep in pitch usually. you should however be able to control for the most part how fast and deep your vibrato is, just like on guitar. i'm not saying i'm perfect, far from it. but these are some little things i've found that made me sing better and easier, because i used to really suck lol

i'd have to hear more low notes to call you a baritone. are you sure you are naming those notes correct? it just doesn't sound like from your talking voice you'd be able to go that low. i can sing high yes, and talk high if i want, but my natural talking voice is pretty low and even a little gravely at times. so i don't know, maybe you're like me but the opposite lol. if you can, try to record a song that shows more of your range. hope some of that helps.
__________________
http://www.youtube.com/user/timmy47?feature=mhee

check out my youtube page for some songs.
Blind In 1 Ear is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-23-2013, 05:18 PM   #408
Johnnysd
Registered User
 
Johnnysd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Norway, where polar bears roam the streets
Small question. I took singing "lessons" a few years back, and our instructor used to play the piano and say sing this note. Now, I could swear I was hitting it, but one of the guys who knew how to sing indicated that I should go lower. If I can't hear what I'm singing correctly, how can I tell my range by using a piano/guitar if I'm that far off without noticing it?
Johnnysd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-25-2013, 08:27 AM   #409
20Tigers
1
 
20Tigers's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnnysd
Small question. I took singing "lessons" a few years back, and our instructor used to play the piano and say sing this note. Now, I could swear I was hitting it, but one of the guys who knew how to sing indicated that I should go lower. If I can't hear what I'm singing correctly, how can I tell my range by using a piano/guitar if I'm that far off without noticing it?

Ear training comes with time. Hearing your own voice is something that is rather interesting. Using a microphone and headphones can help because you hear what other people hear.

If it is a matter of ear training - namely that you aren't good at recognizing pitch and naturally sing a P5 harmony with the fundamental note and think it sounds the same for example then it takes time and practice to get better.

If your ear isn't good and you want to figure out your range you could record yourself doing lip rolls or buzzing hums. Warm up first then record yourself going from low to high then back down again. Repeat two or three times.

Then run it through some pitch recognition software (Melodyne, Sing and See or something similar). You might be able to get a free trial of some of that software just to do this if not then just record yourself post it as an MP3 in your profile and send me a PM and I will do it for you.) The result will look like a mountain going up then down and you should be able to easily see the range you are going through. It won't tell you what register your voice is in though just the range.

You could use this to then create some simple piano tracks of scales, arpeggios, and intervals for warm up and vocal exercises tailored to your range. Don't go to the extreme limits of your range for these. Start two three or even four notes away from the limits. So if your lowest note is some sort of D then maybe start your exercises on an F or G. If the highest note is some sort of D then maybe use A or B as the highest note in the scales.

There will be some exercises and some warm ups for going through the whole range but very few. You won't need to anyway, if you stay in a comfortable range through your exercises you will improve your voice with less probability of strain or damage. The weird thing is when you improve your voice even with a "buffer" on your range, as your voice is stronger and has better tone, it improves throughout the entire range. Even on those outer notes you weren't practicing.

Work on your ear training too. Use a piano or guitar to learn to hear pitch and intervals, and look for some vocal exercises to work on pitch matching. Record yourself often and listen back critically for flaws and things to work on.

And of course a good teacher is very helpful. Teaching yourself guitar is one thing - if you break the instrument you can get another. When it comes to your voice if you break that you can't replace it.

Best of Luck.
__________________
Si
20Tigers is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-26-2013, 03:00 PM   #410
eric_wearing
KillerOfIdiocracy
 
eric_wearing's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
I just got curious as to what I'd be if I joined a choir. I googled range, pretty simple, and I found that vocal range and vocal types are often quite confused.

Anyway, my range is:
Middle voice is D4-C5 not even a full octave
Head voice is E3-G5 pretty good saying I've never sang.

Any help on other factors in deciding type?
__________________
Metalhead Guitarist in training/Hip Hop fan/Possible rapper/Perfectionist of Versatility/Noob

Quote:
Originally Posted by DBKGUITAR
To be a good lead guitar you must be VERY GOOD AT RYTHM

Quote:
Originally Posted by MaggaraMarine
My motto: Play what the song needs you to play!
eric_wearing is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2013, 01:44 AM   #411
Em J
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
A friend of mine had me singing notes on his keyboard and he told me I'm an alto. My highest note is the C one octave above middle C, and I think I can get down to a G, maybe F below middle C
Em J is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-07-2013, 03:13 PM   #412
MaddMann274
Ridding sanity
 
MaddMann274's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Maldives
I can do G3 to C5.. Am I a Mezzo-Soprano?
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by MaddMann274
OMG!! You quoted yourself in your sig....



Twitter
Reverbnation
MaddMann274 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-27-2013, 10:13 AM   #413
ArtistLion
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
I did some Vocal Practice today and here I'm singing in the lowest note:



Here are my highest sung notes



So judging by this I think I'm a bass right? or lower baritone?
What do you guys think.
ArtistLion is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2013, 07:39 PM   #414
Surf-Banana
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Quote:
Originally Posted by ArtistLion
I did some Vocal Practice today and here I'm singing in the lowest note:



Here are my highest sung notes



So judging by this I think I'm a bass right? or lower baritone?
What do you guys think.


The highest note that I caught in the sound clips you linked was a C#4, and the lowest note I was able to catch was a G2. A bass typically has a high note at around E4 or so (although it varies) and a low note of E2 or below. A singer who can't go below a G2 would have to have a very deep timbre to really be classified as a bass.

Based on the timbre of your voice, I would say that you are most likely a baritone. Although you never sang anything above E4 (typically considered the highest note for a bass), based on the sound of your voice, you could probably expand your upper range considerably with proper technique and practice within a few months.

Last edited by Surf-Banana : 11-01-2013 at 07:40 PM.
Surf-Banana is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-2013, 10:42 PM   #415
ArtistLion
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
^thank you very much for posting. Seems with perfect practice i can develop a solid rock voice
ArtistLion is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-18-2013, 03:05 PM   #416
Leferia
Registered User
 
Leferia's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Port orange, Florida, US
primarily, im a baritone, but im training myself to sing in every range. i dont want limits to my voice and neither should anyone else. limits are for those who believe in them.
Leferia is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-08-2013, 03:23 PM   #417
DBKGUITAR
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Hello I don't know what range am i, i did the test in internet i can sing from g2-c6 vocal range. What am i?¿
DBKGUITAR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2014, 09:47 AM   #418
arteg
Registered User
 
arteg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Latvia
Seth Riggs, the author of Speech Level Singing method has a different classifying of voices:

Soprano - G below middle C to F above two octaves above middle C.
Mezzo-Soprano - G below middle C to D above two octaves above middle C.
Alto - low C to two octaves above middle C.
Tenor - low C to high E - same as alto
Baritone - low G to High B
Bass - deep C (two octaves below middle C) to G above middle C

And I've read many testimonials of his students, that everyone can sing much higher with SLS
__________________
Speech Level Singing
arteg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-07-2014, 01:27 PM   #419
cto
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Check out this singing method we use in our video
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g7NNGNABH_g
cto is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 02:25 PM.

Forum Archives / About / Terms of Use / Advertise / Contact / Ultimate-Guitar.Com © 2014
Powered by: vBulletin Version 3.0.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.