Go Back   UG Community @ Ultimate-Guitar.Com > Instruments > Guitar Techniques
User Name  
Password
Search:

Reply
Old 06-03-2010, 07:41 AM   #21
ronkun
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
In my case though i learned a using method which is close to the 3NPS method but what my teacher did back then was letting me find the patterns by myself by making me analyze all the notes until i found a box pattern this method is faster than CAGED for me but when i checked up the CAGED system it really shows how to relate scales to chords so it really pays to learn both
__________________
Whoever said the telecasters were only made for country deserves a banjo slapping.
Quote:
Rick_Diculous wrote:

A band's greatness is measured on Rock Band sales
ronkun is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2010, 04:22 PM   #22
althebold711
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Quote:
Originally Posted by Goodnighttnight
Hey i'm learning the major scale right now and i have a question that's been slowing me down ,

Should i learn the major scale with the CAGED system ( 3 notes on 5 strings ,2 notes on 1) , - here http://justinguitar.com/en/SC-001-TheMajorScale.php

This means learning only 5 "boxes"


Or should i learn it with 3 notes per each string - http://z.about.com/d/guitar/1/0/X/G..._per_string.gif



I find it easier with the CAGED system as the boxes seem more compact and easier to improvise on , also they are only 5 boxes instead of 7 with the 3 note per string thing. But i want to learn it the right way.

What should i do ?


The right way would be to not learn either and to either learn the notes of the fretboard and/or the intervals ie. the number of semitones between each note of a scale. The latter i find much easier.
althebold711 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-31-2011, 09:23 PM   #23
Astounding
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
There's a lot of terrible information in this thread. To any new guitarists who stumble upon this thread, beware of people telling you to blindly feel your way through. Learn the pattern system that works best for you, then let your subconscious use it.

Last edited by Astounding : 08-31-2011 at 09:26 PM.
Astounding is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-31-2011, 11:21 PM   #24
fretmaster13
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
I say learn the 3 note per string patterns and then learn to take the notes up and down to get all of the shapes in your mind. You can learn the mode shapes for each key too.
__________________
"To this day I don't have a guitar idol. I have people who are my favorites." - Randy Rhoads

I play teh Yngwie licks: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nn8_D5ttc9w
fretmaster13 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2011, 12:37 AM   #25
Camo1902
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Quote:
Originally Posted by Astounding
There's a lot of terrible information in this thread. To any new guitarists who stumble upon this thread, beware of people telling you to blindly feel your way through. Learn the pattern system that works best for you, then let your subconscious use it.


Completely agree. Some dodgy info in here.

I learned 3nps first and then condensed the patterns to work out the CAGED shapes. Practiced them a bunch and committed them to memory so that using them now is completely natural.

Don't really think it matters which you start with, as long as long as you're properly learning your scales. Once you really nail 1 set of the patterns the other set is pretty simple to work out.
Camo1902 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2011, 12:52 AM   #26
fretmaster13
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
The problem with caged shapes is that they sometimes contain a 2 note string or have an awkward fingering, but they're good for getting the hang of different tones. 3 notes allows you to play faster. Not necessarily better, but is easier when you want to play fast.
__________________
"To this day I don't have a guitar idol. I have people who are my favorites." - Randy Rhoads

I play teh Yngwie licks: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nn8_D5ttc9w
fretmaster13 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2011, 01:07 AM   #27
zincabopataurio
Registered User
 
zincabopataurio's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Learn both, they both are useful depending on the context. Also, you shouldn't depend on shapes to learn scales, make sure you also learn the scales properly.
zincabopataurio is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2011, 01:50 AM   #28
fretmaster13
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
I think learning scales properly is all about actually hearing the notes. Not just playing them mindlessly and vibrato-less-ly like some people on youtube. If you have a lack of vibrato then you just don't understand the sound of music. That's how I see it. If there's no good vibrato on the last note of your run, then you need to reassess. Vibrato plays a huge role TO ME in whether you understand music or not.
__________________
"To this day I don't have a guitar idol. I have people who are my favorites." - Randy Rhoads

I play teh Yngwie licks: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nn8_D5ttc9w

Last edited by fretmaster13 : 09-02-2011 at 01:51 AM.
fretmaster13 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2011, 03:49 AM   #29
Zaphod_Beeblebr
Shallow and pedantic.
 
Zaphod_Beeblebr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Behind a desk.
Quote:
Originally Posted by fretmaster13
I think learning scales properly is all about actually hearing the notes. Not just playing them mindlessly and vibrato-less-ly like some people on youtube. If you have a lack of vibrato then you just don't understand the sound of music. That's how I see it. If there's no good vibrato on the last note of your run, then you need to reassess. Vibrato plays a huge role TO ME in whether you understand music or not.


Over use of vibrato is just as bad as having none. Control and appropriate use are the key words here.
__________________


Quote:
Originally Posted by steven seagull
Zaphod wins...flawless victory.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Freepower
Another flawless victory for Zaph!



Zaphod_Beeblebr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-20-2013, 08:13 PM   #30
BrandyWalch
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
I prefer the 3nps method but my first guitar teacher taught me (well sorta taught me) the caged system. I think learning them both would have a positive affect though
BrandyWalch is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-21-2013, 03:22 AM   #31
Zaphod_Beeblebr
Shallow and pedantic.
 
Zaphod_Beeblebr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Behind a desk.
__________________


Quote:
Originally Posted by steven seagull
Zaphod wins...flawless victory.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Freepower
Another flawless victory for Zaph!



Zaphod_Beeblebr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-21-2013, 09:22 PM   #32
raredesign
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
I personally think caged for pent/blues and 3 note per string for full major/minor.
The more you practice, the lines will disappear and it becomes a single fingerboard. Obviously, the virtual boxes exist in different ways depending on how you want to do runs, etc.

What I found helped a lot is mixing the modes over the pentatonic caged system so you learn where the sharps/flats are.

I have seen many well known guitarists use the 3NPS method in their scale runs.
raredesign is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-21-2013, 09:37 PM   #33
raredesign
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Quote:
Originally Posted by Astounding
There's a lot of terrible information in this thread. To any new guitarists who stumble upon this thread, beware of people telling you to blindly feel your way through. Learn the pattern system that works best for you, then let your subconscious use it.


I completely agree. Thanks for posting this. I am so tired of hearing people think that there is some form of eliteness demonstrated in those who learn slowly by picking through the notes with their ear simply because they don't want to put in the time to train their muscle memory. Don't get me wrong, everyone is entitled to learn however suits them, but pushing it like it is gospel can really hinder some new players.

What worked for me is spending the time to get the scales hammered into a fluid muscle memory so I don't think about it or have to look and if I slip and come short, my ear immediately recognizes so I slide or bend.
raredesign is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-21-2013, 11:50 PM   #34
cdgraves
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Neither approach is useful if you don't practice your scales with position changes. Non-stop motion, up and down, open position to 19th position. Use 4 notes on the E strings to switch positions.

4 notes per string scales are also a great way to avoid getting stuck in positions. Having those under your fingers will make it easy to move up and down the fretboard no matter where you are.

It's really important to remember that positions are a technique thing. The position should be a matter of choice based on where your chords/melodies are going and what tone you want.
cdgraves is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 11:00 AM.

Forum Archives / About / Terms of Use / Advertise / Contact / Ultimate-Guitar.Com © 2014
Powered by: vBulletin Version 3.0.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.