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Old 07-08-2013, 07:15 PM   #1
Ilovemusic1234
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I am stuck

I can always write the music, and I can never write words. I was thinking about making a song for my best friend because she always is happy, and I don't want her to change but I want it to be up beat. I have an acoustic guitar if that helps.
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Old 07-09-2013, 04:49 AM   #2
DRMguitar
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Honestly, I would dream of having it like you.

I can write music (at a level where people are like "that was pretty good" but with a sarcastic expression) but when it comes to lyrics I am pretty good. It is a well known fact that everybody has stinkers for songs, so don't get down about anything you have written but don't like. Heck, I went from writing the stupidest, most cliche sounding song, to writing one of my personal favorites. As far as tips go, failure will be a sixth sense that you develop after many lyrical disgraces. You will learn the difference between masterpiece and failure. The sense is just experience, you will realize "You are up like the beat on my bass drum, When I need happy I ask you for some" sounds a bit better (even though it was off the top of my head) than "You are upbeat, cooler than my feet, Dwight from Office farms beets, you are elite, hot like heat, and you make people take a seat" a rhyme is not always your best friend. Just because it rhymes does not make it quality, a lot of people don't realize that. A poor sense of quality or quantity will make or break your songs.

Think of a mood you want to replicate in the song, and find a way to stay that way. The hardest songs to write are the ones you don't want to write. Try finishing a sad song when you just got a new puppy, or guitar. Impossible.

Mood, tone, diction, all stuff you probably talked about in poetry units at school. Use those to convey a message that the listen wants to hear. A reader won't want to hear "I am happy" or "I am sad" they want to be punched in the face with depth! But don't get to deep with your lyrics, as no one is going to understand that "Golden rain falls, it pours down to me, it leaves a lengthy highway, that I ride in a Bugatti" means you are excited or happy.

Your first set of lyrics will probably not be the next Hotel California, but that doesn't mean your tenth will be a failure, too. Since I have no idea what kind of song you a making, I can't help beyond basic tips.

Last edited by DRMguitar : 07-09-2013 at 04:51 AM.
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Old 07-10-2013, 09:46 AM   #3
Tutis
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Read some poems, you will find some good ideas there, if will help you to express primitive things with some "spices" and so on. Just be open-hearted and express your feelings.
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Old 07-23-2013, 01:25 AM   #4
sarabarryy
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Maybe we should collaborate. Since I seem to write lyrics pretty well but then get stuck on the music part, lol
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Old 07-25-2013, 06:37 PM   #5
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Being able to write music is much more important in your situation than lyrics. I don't have any issues with either so I can say this unbiased. Say what you want to say with the lyrics, without being forward. If you can't think of anything to sing about, then write the lyrics about your creativity block.

Just please, do not go forward and make it painfully easy to understand what you are trying to convey. This strips the art form of it's integrity. If you are more vague about what you are conveying, there will also be multiple ways of connecting things you weren't even thinking of.

If you are able to come up with interesting progressions that put the listener in the mood you were aiming for, way more than half of this battle is already won. Lyrics are something to bring out the inner-poet in you and if this does not exist, make the lyrics simply fun to listen to.
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Old 08-19-2013, 05:49 PM   #6
gabehwkns1
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I know it may seem redundant given the other posts, but it bears repeating, inspiration is the first element needed in songwriting, whether its lyrics or music you happen to be working on at the time.

Everyone writes differently. We all have writer's block from time to time and even great lyricists write a ton of stuff they aren't satisfied with before finding that gem of a line. Songwriting is a skill, and just like any other skill it's one that needs to be practiced. The more you write, the better you'll get.

Some ideas to get you started:
1. Find some inspiration
What's something you're passionate about? Anything or anyone in your life that evokes certain feelings? Any current events you feel strongly about one way or the other? What chords/notes are you using? What sort of emotions or ideas can you tie their sound to? Work on identifying a subject--and view this loosely. You don't have to write a story with characters. Music is about expression, so find that one emotion or idea and see where it takes you.

2. Freewrite
This is something that has helped me tremendously in developing my songwriting skills. When you finally identify the subject of your song, be it an emotion, an issue, or whatever, chances are you'll have a ton of ideas flowing through your head at once. Lines or phrases here and there related to the subject. Write these down, no matter how random, how "bad" or "good" you think they are. I view it as spilling your thoughts onto a piece of paper so that you can actually look at its tangible representation. Once you've done that, pick out the parts you like the most. Pick out the words, lines, and phrases that you think are cool or capture your point the best and use this as a starting point for writing the rest of your song.

3. Try different techniques
Generally speaking, I've found that a lot of artists write music first, then lyrics. While you may be tempted to try this, know that there is no "right" or "wrong" way to write a song. That method may be great for you, and if so, use it. For me, however, I tend to sit down with my guitar or at my keyboard and write music and lyrics at the same time. I'll play a riff or some chords that I like and start throwing a melody around on top of the music. Don't worry about what you're saying, just focus on the melody and say whatever comes to mind. More often than not, you'll spill out a line you really like anyway. This is the technique that works best for me. Again, you may find it difficult or unhelpful and if so, just experiment and find what works for you.

4. Don't try to be anything in particular
Lastly, don't fixate on being a certain kind of songwriter. Be yourself. Don't "try" to write a certain genre of music. All too often you'll find yourself feeling as if you have to use certain chords or techniques in order to fit into a certain genre. This can really limit your expression and your songwriting skills with suffer as a result. Write and play what you feel. This will develop your skills and your own personal style quicker than anything. Once you've found what works for you, then by all means challenge yourself to write a particular style of song. Trying to write specific kinds of music is not an inherently bad thing, it's just that it prevents you from getting comfortable with the act of songwriting in general when you are first starting out, and worrying about fitting into a particular genre can make the process of learning how to write songs that much more difficult.

Hope some of this helps you get started
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Old 09-13-2013, 02:41 AM   #7
Lifesign
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gabehwkns1
3. Try different techniques
Generally speaking, I've found that a lot of artists write music first, then lyrics. While you may be tempted to try this, know that there is no "right" or "wrong" way to write a song. That method may be great for you, and if so, use it. For me, however, I tend to sit down with my guitar or at my keyboard and write music and lyrics at the same time. I'll play a riff or some chords that I like and start throwing a melody around on top of the music. Don't worry about what you're saying, just focus on the melody and say whatever comes to mind. More often than not, you'll spill out a line you really like anyway. This is the technique that works best for me. Again, you may find it difficult or unhelpful and if so, just experiment and find what works for you.


When I was in a media course in high school, we had a project to write a song, with your typical three-chorus song structure. Our teacher suggested we wrote the lyrics first, then come up with the instruments afterwards. That way, when you're recording the vocals, you can alter the lyrics if it doesn't fit with the vocal melody or it doesn't work.
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