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Old 04-07-2013, 07:04 PM   #21
sweetdude3000
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tall011
"Combining music theory (understanding scales, modes, chord structure, improvising over chord progressions, etc, etc.) and knowing all the notes on the fingerboard will open up a whole new world."

Somebody want to help me with all the shit up there that's in parenthesis. like explain how to approach going about learning all that shit. like some links to some site that will teach that shit would be helpful or books or something ya know. like some step by step instructions for all that shit. that would be much appreciated thank you all

ill look it up myself if i have to, but if you anybody has any good recommendations i'd love to check it out. Fretboard warrior was actually a great suggestion.


Get Creative Guitar books by Guthrie Govan and also I'd recommend a Tagliano or Kolb book for soloing. There is a lot of misleading stuff on the net. Those books are cheap and will last you years of time to master all of that.
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Old 04-07-2013, 08:40 PM   #22
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[QUOTE=sweetdude3000}. Maybe if you are changing keys a lot and you need to know where the tonic notes are located on the fly? Do people really think in a middle of a solo, okay I need this Bb note to form a major seventh chord. I think it makes sense to know how to find your shapes in patterns in advance, practice those, instead of doing it on the fly. .[/QUOTE]

I think knowing all the notes is obviously less important that knowing the notes on the two low strings, but you know what?

I think there is an advantage to it. How could there not be?

It's not that hard to learn, although you have to put a little bit of time into it. (5 minutes a day, maybe, for a few weeks). But do you really think there's no advantage?

I wonder why people are always looking for reasons NOT to know stuff. You want to get good at this, soak up everything. No, I wouldn't necessarily put memorizing the fretboard above basic theory or ear training, but as one of those things worth putting a little time in, what's the argument against it?

Certainly any time you're playing with other musicians it's potentially useful. "Go to C# after 4 ..." you don't want to have to stop and think about what you're doing, do you?

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Old 04-08-2013, 05:02 AM   #23
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Originally Posted by mdc
Just to reiterate, learning the notes on the fretboard is absolutely pointless. That's the equivalent of memorizing the alphabet, but not knowing how to use the letters, in other words, not knowing how to SPELL.

SOUND. Intervals, relative pitch training, melodic first, then harmonic, then the six different types of triads, then all the 7th chords, the all the 9th chords and further extensions.

If you were in college, they'd have you trained up in all of that within a year. So, there's your benchmark, a year.

I wouldn't go so far as to say that learning the notes on the fretboard is "absolutely pointless"
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Old 04-08-2013, 11:35 AM   #24
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They're useful for building chords. But a interval's an interval. TS should be able to recognize a major 6th when he hears one. I don't care whether it's F up to D, C up to A, E down to G, or B down to D.
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Old 04-08-2013, 03:04 PM   #25
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Originally Posted by HotspurJr
I wonder why people are always looking for reasons NOT to know stuff. You want to get good at this, soak up everything. No, I wouldn't necessarily put memorizing the fretboard above basic theory or ear training, but as one of those things worth putting a little time in, what's the argument against it?


Time is a limited commodity. People analyze things on a cost/benefit basis depending on their level of playing at the moment. I think there ought to be a list of priorities out there for a guitar player for well-rounded development based on their style. I would have never considered interval training useful until I read about it. I wouldn't have bothered learning the modes until I developed more of my basic skills. And it's extremely difficult to learn something unless you have a useful application for it, otherwise it won't stick.
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Old 04-09-2013, 01:21 AM   #26
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^but you can do this at the same time as you do other things. Study intervals & learn note names at the same time. Do ear training and learn the note names at the same time. So the time factor isn't necesarily a factor...but then again I suppose it is if you are going to dedicate a specific amount of time each day with your goal being to learn them all in 16 days.

One clear and definite benefit to knowing the note names is that it allows you to read sheet music. You can not read sheet music without knowing where to find the notes on the fretboard. Of course reading sheet music is not important to a lot of guitarists - but just saying.
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Old 04-09-2013, 11:16 AM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mdc
They're useful for building chords. But a interval's an interval. TS should be able to recognize a major 6th when he hears one. I don't care whether it's F up to D, C up to A, E down to G, or B down to D.



I agree that intervals are important and that the TS should be able to recognise them. However, I do care if it's an F to a D or a C to an A. I don't understand how knowing where the notes are is pointless is anyway.
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Old 04-09-2013, 11:49 AM   #28
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I'm being a cunt, dude. Of course there is some use in it. Like for reading gigs, really, really ****ing useful.

But for the sake of improvising, if players have a picture of a steady stream of notes of the musical alphabet whizzing through their mind's eye whilst improvising, then they're absolutely off this ****ing planet.

It's just a combination of muscle memory and sound (interval) recognition when it comes to improvising.

Edit: About the sight reading, at a high level, they're not even thinking about the notes, it's just the pattern and contour, and then they instinctively know how to play it, and sight sing it, cuz they've done it so much.

You should agree with that, you play violin.

Last edited by mdc : 04-09-2013 at 11:59 AM.
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Old 04-09-2013, 07:03 PM   #29
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Thinking about every single note is extreme, and you're only talking about one situation. Conversely, even at a high level, people recenter their placement from time to time by knowing their notes while reading - though yes, it is mostly pattern recognition. It would be nearly as ridiculous to maintain an entire piece with only interval and contour recognition.
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Old 04-09-2013, 11:48 PM   #30
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Originally Posted by mdc
I'm being a cunAbout the sight reading, at a high level, they're not even thinking about the notes, it's just the pattern and contour, and then they instinctively know how to play it, and sight sing it, cuz they've done it so much.

You should agree with that, you play violin.
It's completely irrelevant though.
Regardless of how the pros do it if you want to learn to sight read you must learn the notes on your instrument.
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Old 04-10-2013, 08:17 PM   #31
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Originally Posted by 20Tigers
The analogy is not confusing but it is not accurate.


You're right. I'm sorry, I couldn't come up with anything better at the moment.
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