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Old 04-18-2012, 06:36 PM   #21
progmtlr
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I recommend learning just a few scales for now...then focusing on musical application with those scales. At this point you don't need to learn a bunch of extra material that you won't even use
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Old 04-18-2012, 08:00 PM   #22
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Search ''Fretboard Topologies'' by Nicholas Puryear : 300 pages of scales/patterns/boxes or whatever you call them. It's a free ebook and there's a thread about it somewhere in this forum.
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Old 04-19-2012, 01:34 AM   #23
krypticguitar87
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Beezerk
Yes that's exactly what I meant, excellent answer by the way.
So do you suggest I get comfortable with knowing the notes on the fretboard before learning scales?
Also, do the notes transpose up and down the neck when you change tuning?
So for instance if I play tuned to D rather than E all the notes in a scale would be played two frets further up the neck or am I barking up the wrong tree?
Kin' minefield all this stuff lol.

well I say to learn the scales on paper. I usually have my students make a chart of sorts, something like:

Code:
Major Scales WWHWWWH C Major C D E F G A B C G Major G....(well I'm not going to give you all the answers :haha:)

and while they are doing that they are learning where notes are on the fretboard as part of their guitar work.

also you are correct about the notes changing position in alternate tunings, but once you learn the notes in standard relearning it becomes pretty easy.

Well good luck and I hope this post helped!
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Old 04-19-2012, 01:41 AM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by krypticguitar87
well I say to learn the scales on paper. I usually have my students make a chart of sorts, something like:

Code:
Major Scales WWHWWWH C Major C D E F G A B C G Major G....(well I'm not going to give you all the answers :haha:)

and while they are doing that they are learning where notes are on the fretboard as part of their guitar work.

also you are correct about the notes changing position in alternate tunings, but once you learn the notes in standard relearning it becomes pretty easy.

Well good luck and I hope this post helped!


Thanks mate, time to get scribbling.

Btw WWHWWWH is that whole and half notes or maybe 2 and 1 frets?
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Old 04-19-2012, 01:49 AM   #25
Hydra150
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Im too tired to read this thread but I assume that someone has already pointed out how pointless a book of scales is.
+1 to whoever has expressed that.
Scales are just a series of notes - learn the notea pf the fretboard, how to construct the major scale (to aid your understanding of stuff like diatonic harmony and other basic theory) and a few forms of the maj/min pentatonic scales to help you bust out some cliche rock licks.
The rest is up to your ears and your imagination, a book filled with arbitrary note sequences and fingerings will not do you much good.
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Old 04-19-2012, 01:53 AM   #26
krypticguitar87
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Beezerk
Thanks mate, time to get scribbling.

Btw WWHWWWH is that whole and half notes or maybe 2 and 1 frets?


it's W=whole step and H=half step

so with your musical alphabet:
C C#/Db D D#/Eb E F F#/Gb G G#/Ab A A#/Bb B C

movement from each one to the next is a half step, so a whole step is from C to D and a half step is from C to C#/Db.
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Old 04-19-2012, 05:19 AM   #27
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+1 on **** the book method.

1) learn the chromatic scale
2) learn the formula for forming the major scale (1 2 34 5 6 7) (alt: w-w-h -w- w-w-h)
3) form your own "scales"
4) prcatice away for years.
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Old 04-19-2012, 08:32 AM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by krypticguitar87
it's W=whole step and H=half step

so with your musical alphabet:
C C#/Db D D#/Eb E F F#/Gb G G#/Ab A A#/Bb B C

movement from each one to the next is a half step, so a whole step is from C to D and a half step is from C to C#/Db.



Yes sorry, that's what I meant lol.
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Old 04-19-2012, 08:55 AM   #29
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As the thread goes on it does seem like my original recommendations (which are only useful as a visual reference) is definitely not what is needed here.

TS - you need to put more effort into learning more about music theory. Some of the information in this thread tells you a few of the answers, but I'm definitely getting the impression that you don't actually know enough to be asking the right questions yet.

You said in the original post that you've been learning from the internet, but I'd say you could use a proper music teacher to help you through all this. At the very least you need to be using a book/website that can take you through music theory starting with the absolute basics and working your way up to where you want to be.
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Old 04-19-2012, 09:00 AM   #30
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I'm actually a drummer who's taken up guitar over the last year, just messing around really but I want to progress instead of just plodding along with power chords etc.
It's damn hard, but not as hard as drumming
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Old 04-19-2012, 09:11 AM   #31
Hydra150
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Read these articles, TS.
Your'e welcome.
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Old 04-19-2012, 01:05 PM   #32
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Regardless of the ideology of reading scales or writing them to play, going back to the original question, one of my favorite scale books is The Guitarist's Scale Book, by Peter Vogl. I really like the layout of standard notation, tablature, and fretboard diagrams.

The Guitarist's Scale Book

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