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Old 06-28-2013, 06:50 PM   #21
metalmetalhead
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my bad on the C# I guess I made the chord wrong in my head. I see what your saying. But Your over complicating it.

My Major V a G# oh big woop. A harmonic minor works Or A minor. Its also has B and E in there so it really sounds good with a simple approach.
Its that, where ole where has my ole dog gone,
Or in Dm I wont see you tonite by Av7.
Or I was made for loving you by kiss.
A really popular progression, one should have no problem making "sound good". but anyway

key only approach? I restrict myself in no way. But I always acknowledge what key a song is in. I use the chords

If looking at the chord changes helps do it. If you need to analyze the piece that well go for it man. When the music isn't In 1 key so profoundly and your having trouble You'll have to have a deeper look..

The progression still has a Key. I always use my ears. Thats the best way to learn this stuff.
Instead of trying to learn when and where. You play and learn.

You must have certain notes you aim for on chords huh? In Am what do you usually play over the Dm chord? You know you can play many different notes to the same chord don't you?

Lets see the basic progression for the solo rhythm to sweet child of mine

|Em G A C D|

just point out The simple approach. When I first started learning my own improv trying to follow the chords around was misleading. Soloing isn't hard copying other solos isn't either. Its because we have keys and ears.

And you can write kick ass solos with simple simple rhythms. But its always good to expand your knowledge. Id check out the song and if theres chords out of key Id certainly consider that.
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Old 06-28-2013, 09:42 PM   #22
cdgraves
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Knowing what chords are happening and what notes are in those chords isn't "over complicating" anything.

Keys and scales are fundamental concepts, but they don't tell what's happening in the music right now, which is what matters when you're improvising. If all you play is bluesy classic rock, sure, key works fine because it's all diatonic 5th chords anyway. But the moment you encounter the other 90% of music that contains actual harmonic progression, key and scale based improvisation is insufficient.
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Old 06-29-2013, 09:06 AM   #23
metalmetalhead
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I See your point and I agree. Tho I wouldn't say 90% What music do you mean? Rock in General Is what I prefer to play. Its the best, New rock too. Most of the greatest songs come from Rock N Roll!

But what you say really requires a firm grasp of the fretboard and chord building. And Its a slow road to go down it seems. Thats way I say Its over complicating.

Learning your fret board is the first step. I would suggest playing in C M Am for a while memorizing all the "white notes" And then sharping and flatting any notes from there when thinking about the fret board.

another way to improve on your solos is articulation and dynamics.
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Old 07-01-2013, 08:40 AM   #24
Sean0913
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No, I wouldn't agree either. Not 90 percent. In fact even when chords start taking on modal interchange, even though the song is not diatonic any more, use of the same scales, especially 5 note ones, can be made to work, where the scale notes pass like color tones.

You have to be wise to not let your scale sustain on a "color" note.

Best,

Sean
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Old 07-01-2013, 09:57 PM   #25
cdgraves
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I never said it was useless, just insufficient.

Many almost-good guitarists develop everything but a comprehensive, integrated approach to soloing that supports a diversity of musical techniques.

We're all talking about the same sets of notes here, the difference is simply in their treatment rhythmically and melodically. Mode/Scale Mixture is an appropriate way to look at it when you play a whole phrase from a particular scale, but it's not so effective when you're using minor scale and color tones consecutively with diatonic tones. It's way to cumbersome to say that you're "changing scales" with every other 8th note. You can't really ascribe a scalar quality to a single note.

If you play a major arpeggio in swing 8ths, approaching each note from a half step below, you're technically playing a diminished scale or switching rapidly between minor to major, but the sound is most definitely a bluesy/jazzy major arpeggio.

Last edited by cdgraves : 07-01-2013 at 10:02 PM.
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