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Old 11-26-2012, 09:12 AM   #1
Xerosnake90
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Creating music, music theory.

Hey everyone.

Been playing guitar for a little while now. I understand how to play the guitar, but I don't understand how to make music with it. If that makes sense. Soloing, melodic or heavy does not work. If I'm to solo, I'll pretty much be randomly playing notes all over the place. This isn't music, this does not sound good, and this does not make me happy. Aside from just taking things slow so I can get much better at my fundamentals, this has been my biggest issue. I'd love to create music if I understood how, I simply don't. I've tried to learn. Always starting off with the notes on the guitar, and how or why they work together. Simple stuff like that I've honestly never understood. I've tried to learn, but I get stumped.

Any guidance would be greatly appreciated. Playing guitar is simple enough, play it at a speed you can do and speed up until you can play it fast. Learning notes, what a scale is and why it works with this and that etc. Might as well be a foreign language to me...

I feel once I understand how to make music a bit more, I'll be motivated to tighten up all my playing at the same time. I can be sloppy and inconsistent at times.
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Old 11-26-2012, 10:13 AM   #2
steven seagull
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moved to MT as it seems more that kinda thing
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Old 11-26-2012, 03:16 PM   #3
jsantos
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Learning Music Theory won't necessarily make you more creative, It's a tool to organize your thoughts and a means to communicate your musical ideas to other musicians. Maybe start off with studying intervals and study melody/harmony. Listen to music you like and try to emulate that through your playing.
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Old 11-26-2012, 04:28 PM   #4
CarsonStevens
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Get a copy of the following books;

The Complete Idiot's Guide to Music Composition
The Complete Idiot's Guide to Solos and Improvisation

They break down what a melody is, how to construct one, how to harmonize it to the underlying chords properly, and how to construct a melody/solo out of those bits in a very accessible way. That's what you need.
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Old 11-26-2012, 08:38 PM   #5
satch291
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A good start is to learn other bands songs fully, I mean not just the chords, if there's more than one guitarist learn each and every guitar part in the song to see how they work together and complement each other.

Then look at a solo, and not only practice it, learn the rhythm part too. Then when you know both parts find out what scale the solo is and how/why it fits to the rhythm parts.

Once you have done that just keep doing it for 4 or 5 songs, and look for similarities in chord changes between the songs. Then you start to build up a small vocabulary of chords and scales which you know work together.

Once you have that you should start looking at more indepth theory.

Last edited by satch291 : 11-26-2012 at 08:39 PM.
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Old 11-26-2012, 09:42 PM   #6
Xerosnake90
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Quote:
Originally Posted by satch291
A good start is to learn other bands songs fully, I mean not just the chords, if there's more than one guitarist learn each and every guitar part in the song to see how they work together and complement each other.

Then look at a solo, and not only practice it, learn the rhythm part too. Then when you know both parts find out what scale the solo is and how/why it fits to the rhythm parts.

Once you have done that just keep doing it for 4 or 5 songs, and look for similarities in chord changes between the songs. Then you start to build up a small vocabulary of chords and scales which you know work together.

Once you have that you should start looking at more indepth theory.


Best answer I've received so far. Been spending some time lately learning a7x songs. Quite a bit of slow melodic soloing and lots of faster metal parts. I've been learning the rhythm and lead bits so I'll definitely start doing what you said.
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Old 11-27-2012, 01:37 AM   #7
Shredworthy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jsantos
Learning Music Theory won't necessarily make you more creative, It's a tool to organize your thoughts and a means to communicate your musical ideas to other musicians. Maybe start off with studying intervals and study melody/harmony. Listen to music you like and try to emulate that through your playing.


This!

Making or writing music really only depends on :

How it's put together (structure/form)
The use of dynamics and phrasing
And most importantly, does it actually sound good and work as a musical phrase/piece?

Hope this helps!
Brendan Hunt
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Old 11-29-2012, 05:29 AM   #8
Jehannum
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Learning other bands' songs is an inefficient and probably not very effective way of learning chords and scales that work together. It's good for developing playing technique, no doubt, but not for writing. Making your own songs from the start, no matter how bad they are at first, has got to be better. By all means listen to as many bands as you can. As long as you learn those sounds you'll be able to replicate something like them one day.

Look up four or five chords in a chord book and strum them or play simple arpeggios. Which chord progressions sound good to you? When you've got something you like record it and you can focus on putting a melody over the top. Even if it's a nursery-rhyme like melody. For a start you won't struggle to play it.

Look at the chords you chose, look at the notes that make up those chords. Read up on keys, and see if you can work out why that progression sounded good to you. That could be your entry point into studying theory.
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