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Old 11-11-2012, 12:02 AM   #1
spudsisnumber1
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Join Date: Oct 2012
Ear Training

how do you improve your ears? i can kind of figure a song out, but it takes hours. longer if it is in a different tuning. Thanks
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Old 11-11-2012, 05:39 AM   #2
llBlackenedll
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Figure more songs out.

For ear training away from the guitar, try good-ear.com or the Android app "Perfect Ear".

A good way to train your ear with the guitar is to play a note on it then try to sing a specific interval above or below it. Then play the interval on the guitar and see if you got it right.
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Old 11-11-2012, 06:28 AM   #3
Sickz
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What Blackened said.

The more songs you learn by ear, the better you'll get at learning by ear. I strongly recommend getting a program like "Amazing Slow Downer" for learning by ear though, especially if you listen to music that includes very fast passages.

That program is essential to me since i listen to alot of progressive metal (Dream Theater, Symphony X) aswell as alot of fusion (Guthrie Govan, Greg Howe). Without that program it would be near impossible to learn songs by ear from those bands for me. But with it i can set it to loop a specific section of the song and almost cut away the other instruments completely. I can also slow the song down while keeping the right pitch of the song. And if i don't have a guitar in the right tuning i can change the key of the song with the program. So that's one thing i recommend.

I also recommend doing intervall exercises. There are good ones on musictheory.net aswell as musiclearningtools.net. And if you have an iPhone or iPod you can actually get musictheory.nets app called "Tenuto", it has ear training exercises aswell as notation reading etc.

I also highly recommend the other thing Blackened mentioned, and that is to sing as you play. Normally when learning something (except maybe chugging riffs) i sing what i play, it's very good for your ear, and getting a good ear will help your improvising aswell.

I hope that helped, good luck & keep practicing!
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Quote:
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Quote:
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"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
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Old 11-11-2012, 06:55 AM   #4
llBlackenedll
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sickz
That program is essential to me since i listen to alot of progressive metal (Dream Theater, Symphony X) aswell as alot of fusion (Guthrie Govan, Greg Howe). Without that program it would be near impossible to learn songs by ear from those bands for me. But with it i can set it to loop a specific section of the song and almost cut away the other instruments completely. I can also slow the song down while keeping the right pitch of the song. And if i don't have a guitar in the right tuning i can change the key of the song with the program. So that's one thing i recommend.

I did not know you could do that.. I've been using Transcribe! which I find really useful but if you can cut out the other instruments with amazing slow downer that would be great. Same thing as you though - I listen to a lot of stuff with fast passages and have found such tools particularly useful for Dream Theater and Guthrie Govan stuff. Also find it really useful for transcribing chords as you can just select the bit where the chord is played and have it play over and over. Oddly, slowing that down helps too. In Transcribe! it makes an attempts at telling you what the chord is too, I try to not look at it so I can work out the chord on my own.

Also - with fast passages, have you found that since working a lot of songs, you don't need to use the slow down feature so much anymore? It takes me by surprise sometimes when I can pick up really fast lead lines without having to slow it down. I'm still crap at listening for chords though, need to work on that.
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Old 11-11-2012, 07:10 AM   #5
Sickz
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Quote:
Originally Posted by llBlackenedll
I did not know you could do that.. I've been using Transcribe! which I find really useful but if you can cut out the other instruments with amazing slow downer that would be great. Same thing as you though - I listen to a lot of stuff with fast passages and have found such tools particularly useful for Dream Theater and Guthrie Govan stuff. Also find it really useful for transcribing chords as you can just select the bit where the chord is played and have it play over and over. Oddly, slowing that down helps too. In Transcribe! it makes an attempts at telling you what the chord is too, I try to not look at it so I can work out the chord on my own.

Also - with fast passages, have you found that since working a lot of songs, you don't need to use the slow down feature so much anymore? It takes me by surprise sometimes when I can pick up really fast lead lines without having to slow it down. I'm still crap at listening for chords though, need to work on that.


Well with amazing slow downer you can do 2 things to help hear the guitar better in the mix.

Firstly, you can choose wich side you want to hear (left side, right side, both sides) this helps cause some bands with two guitar players have the two guitar players play two different things at the same time, putting this to the left or right makes me just hear one of them (most often, if they have tracked both guitars on both sides it does not work, but most often it does).

Secondly you can choose wich frequencies that should be heard more. And since the guitar ranges from mid to lower high frequencies (if that makes sense) i often cut out the low end (the bass + bassdrums). The bass and such is still there, it just can't be heard as much.

And yes, i've gotten alot better at picking out fast passages. There are still some i need to slow down to like 20% speed to be sure (mainly fusion and jazz stuff) but i can figure out most normal metal stuff at like 80% speed or something. Chords is still my weak spot aswell. I've found that trying to pick out really small sections of Allan Holdsworth songs is a great way to improve hearing chordal stuff. So once a week i sit down and try to learn like a 10 sec section of Allan Holdsworth, it's really hard but it feels great when you get it right.
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Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote:
Originally Posted by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
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