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Old 03-12-2013, 02:39 AM   #101
20Tigers
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Originally Posted by Hail
i think that's the sweetest thing you've ever said to me, 20T

That's because when I like something you say I keep it to myself lest you start being nice to me or something. That would be boring.

On that note, some of your recent posts in a few threads lately have said pretty much what I wanted to say. - Scares the shit out of me.
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Old 03-12-2013, 05:24 AM   #102
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Originally Posted by ouchies
How would learning to read sheet music help with anything?

Have you ever heard a classically trained X instrument player try to improvise? Yuck.

Btw I'd take that "experiment" track out of your sound cloud. Lez be honest, no one is going to take you seriously after listening to that.

Learning sheet music teaches you the note names. Many guys who only use tabs think that there are 144 different notes on guitar fretboard.

Improvising has nothing to do with reading sheet music or tabs. But when you read sheet music, you know the note names and you know that every C sounds the same. And if you know where C is on your fretboard and know all the positions where you can find the C note, you can play it anywhere on the neck and don't need to rely on box shapes. You play the notes, not the shapes or numbers.

Classically trained musicians usually don't learn to improvise. Or actually they do but not over a chord progression (because classical music doesn't really have that kind of solo spots that have a chord progression and you can play over it anything you want, classical =/= jamming). When they play a song, they change the tempo and dynamics to their liking. I would call that improvising. You don't need to play different notes to improvise. Improvising is so much more than just playing notes. It's also about how you play the notes. There are so many different ways to play the same notes. And I don't see why they would need to know how to play jazz impro if they will never play it. They don't need to.
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Old 03-12-2013, 09:03 AM   #103
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Originally Posted by MaggaraMarine
Learning sheet music teaches you the note names. Many guys who only use tabs think that there are 144 different notes on guitar fretboard.

Improvising has nothing to do with reading sheet music or tabs. But when you read sheet music, you know the note names and you know that every C sounds the same. And if you know where C is on your fretboard and know all the positions where you can find the C note, you can play it anywhere on the neck and don't need to rely on box shapes. You play the notes, not the shapes or numbers.

Classically trained musicians usually don't learn to improvise. Or actually they do but not over a chord progression (because classical music doesn't really have that kind of solo spots that have a chord progression and you can play over it anything you want, classical =/= jamming). When they play a song, they change the tempo and dynamics to their liking. I would call that improvising. You don't need to play different notes to improvise. Improvising is so much more than just playing notes. It's also about how you play the notes. There are so many different ways to play the same notes. And I don't see why they would need to know how to play jazz impro if they will never play it. They don't need to.


You don't need to read sheet music to learn notes or understand theory. I can guarantee you that the majority of individuals know that there aren't 144 notes on the guitar fretboard. Most people get a basic music education in school.

Oh and you don't need to know sheet music to learn your way around the fretboard. Seriously? If I know where a C is and I understand octaves I can just find every C on my fretboard. I know because I DID THIS.

IMO there is a difference between interpreting a piece and improvising. What you described here was interpreting. To me improvising has always meant "spontaneous and instantaneous composition."
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Last edited by ouchies : 03-12-2013 at 09:05 AM.
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Old 03-12-2013, 09:16 AM   #104
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Originally Posted by ouchies
You don't need to read sheet music to learn notes or understand theory. I can guarantee you that the majority of individuals know that there aren't 144 notes on the guitar fretboard. Most people get a basic music education in school.

Oh and you don't need to know sheet music to learn your way around the fretboard. Seriously? If I know where a C is and I understand octaves I can just find every C on my fretboard. I know because I DID THIS.

IMO there is a difference between interpreting a piece and improvising. What you described here was interpreting. To me improvising has always meant "spontaneous and instantaneous composition."

Of course. But by learning the sheet music you'll automatically learn the note names too. You don't need sheet music for that of course. And also it's good to know sheet music because that's what all the other instruments use. And IMO to know theory it's good to know how to read sheet music. Of course it's not necessary.

I would also say that sheet music is more "musical" than tabs. Tabs tell you what fret to play, sheet music tells you what note to play.

And again, classical musicians don't need to be able to improvise like that. Most of them play in an orchestra or play solo pieces (with piano). And the songs they play usually don't have improvised parts. Some do but there are good improvisers in classical music too.
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Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

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Last edited by MaggaraMarine : 03-12-2013 at 09:18 AM.
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Old 03-16-2013, 03:42 AM   #105
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Dude, KEY is another term for SCALE. Well, that is, if you skip the details.
The key is a term for: the scale that a certain song is based on.
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Old 03-16-2013, 04:01 AM   #106
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Originally Posted by Rocknrolla35
Dude, KEY is another term for SCALE. Well, that is, if you skip the details.
The key is a term for: the scale that a certain song is based on.


nawwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwww
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Old 03-16-2013, 04:24 AM   #107
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Originally Posted by Rocknrolla35
Dude, KEY is another term for SCALE. Well, that is, if you skip the details.
The key is a term for: the scale that a certain song is based on.
Let me be the second person to jump on the "you're dead wrong about that", (at least by omission), bandwagon!

Every key has a scale associated with it. But, every scale is not a key.

In fact, minor keys have at least three scales associated with them, natural, harmonic, and melodic.

Are those the "details" you were talking about?

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Old 03-16-2013, 04:56 AM   #108
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There are 4 keys, they determinate the highness (sorry for this horrible word) of the sounds.


Scales are the notes that you can [or can't] play.

I don't have why explain this, you MUST know this but you seem u didn't know this.
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Old 03-16-2013, 05:07 AM   #109
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Originally Posted by fullstop
There are 4 keys, they determinate the highness (sorry for this horrible word) of the sounds.


Scales are the notes that you can [or can't] play.

I don't have why explain this, you MUST know this but you seem u didn't know this.
That's because those aren't "keys", they're "clefs" and they have nothing to do with keys. All they do is mark the location of a particular note on the musical staff.

The "F clef", (or bass clef), the lower line of music in your picture actually is used to locate the left hand on the piano, and the "G Clef", or "treble clef", indicates the notes for the right hand. That's a very basic and incomplete explanation.

Last edited by Captaincranky : 03-16-2013 at 05:14 AM.
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Old 03-16-2013, 05:20 AM   #110
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Originally Posted by Captaincranky
That's because those aren't "keys", they're "clefs" and they have nothing to do with keys. All they do is mark the location of a particular note on the musical staff.

The "F clef", (or bass clef), the lower line of music in your picture actually is used to locate the left hand on the piano, and the "G Clef", or "treble clef", indicates the notes for the right hand. That's a very basic and incomplete explanation.

Calm down, i just confused with words. In spanish we call them key. And yes, G is for right hand and F for left hand.

And yes, it was a very very basic and incomplete exlpanation. I didn't go to any music school so I know of music the minimal that is teaced in my school. Anyways it's enough to play piano by myself (no one teached me to learn it, and i can say i have an intermediate level).
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Old 03-16-2013, 05:22 AM   #111
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fullstop
There are 4 keys, they determinate the highness (sorry for this horrible word) of the sounds.


Scales are the notes that you can [or can't] play.

I don't have why explain this, you MUST know this but you seem u didn't know this.


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Old 03-16-2013, 09:20 AM   #112
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Originally Posted by fullstop
Calm down, i just confused with words. In spanish we call them key. And yes, G is for right hand and F for left hand.

And yes, it was a very very basic and incomplete exlpanation. I didn't go to any music school so I know of music the minimal that is teaced in my school. Anyways it's enough to play piano by myself (no one teached me to learn it, and i can say i have an intermediate level).

First impressions.
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Old 03-18-2013, 10:51 PM   #113
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I'd like to point out the lack of recognition in this thread for the distinction of a "key signature" and "tonal center".
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