Go Back   UG Community @ Ultimate-Guitar.Com > Instruments > Acoustic & Classical Guitar
User Name  
Password
Search:

Reply
Old 04-22-2013, 01:33 PM   #1
EvilNabbya
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Nut and Saddle help.

I have a Acoustic Fender Guitar model #: IJ100S-NT
I recently switched it to be left handed and I need a new nut and saddle. Does anyone know of an online store in Canada where I can buy them, or can someone recommend ones to buy?
EvilNabbya is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-22-2013, 05:46 PM   #2
patticake
Acoustic Goddess
 
patticake's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Right under the Hollywood sign
if fender sells left handed guitars, there's a good chance that most fender dealers can order what you need. a few phone calls or emails should find you what you want. if fender doesn't offer your guitar as a lefty, you may have to have your stuff made for you by a tech.
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!
patticake is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-22-2013, 05:48 PM   #3
EvilNabbya
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Okay, thank you much for the reply!
EvilNabbya is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-22-2013, 06:34 PM   #4
Captaincranky
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
"Graphtech's web site also lists left handed parts. http://www.graphtech.com/ It is doubtful that a local music store would have them in stock. Perhaps they could order from there also.

Word of caution; my Fender "Sonoran" has an unusual nut that runs directly through the fingerboard, you may have to be mindful of that with your guitar.

Are you sure your saddle is even compensated? If it isn't just reverse it. Here again, my Fender acoustic has an uncompensated saddle. That makes it a "just flip me around" The top nut is indeed, a different, perhaps even proprietary, story.

Last edited by Captaincranky : 04-22-2013 at 07:11 PM.
Captaincranky is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-23-2013, 03:32 PM   #5
EvilNabbya
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
I am not sure if the saddle is not working correctly. The problem is my 6th string E sounds off, and the string is resting on the first fret. I'm not sure how to fix if, I gussed it had to do with either the nut or saddle.
Any help would be greatly appreciated!
EvilNabbya is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-23-2013, 06:34 PM   #6
Captaincranky
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Quote:
Originally Posted by EvilNabbya
I am not sure if the saddle is not working correctly. The problem is my 6th string E sounds off, and the string is resting on the first fret. I'm not sure how to fix if, I gussed it had to do with either the nut or saddle.
Any help would be greatly appreciated!
OK, please read this from beginning to end to end-- http://thbecker.net/guitar_playing/...up_page_01.html and you should be able to answer your own question, and be a bit richer in equipment knowledge for it.

In the meantime, from your description, is sounds like the nut is most of the issue (*). If the saddle were the ONLY problem, the string likely would be too low all the way up the neck. But hey, it could be a little of both.

With that said, if you're going to undertake these "adventures", of trying to convert right hand guitars to left hand guitars, you've have to learn how, and where, to take measurements, plus the terminology. (Which is fairly simple). That's where Mr. Becker's guide can be a powerful tool....best of luck.



(*)The nut grooves are always deeper, and/or the nut is shorter on the "e-1" side. How you have your E-6 string there. Did you already file that groove wider or deeper, if so, that might be where you screwed up.

Last edited by Captaincranky : 04-23-2013 at 06:39 PM.
Captaincranky is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2013, 02:09 AM   #7
Prescott_Player
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
If the saddle is on an angle in the bridge, that would be a problem, because that's a part of the compensation strategy.

Check your intonation by tuning each open string to the standard note, then see what happens as you play each note going up the fretboard. If they start to go high or low, then you obviously have problems.

Most guitars have slight intonation issues... but if it's quite pronounced, then there's no easy way to correct it, and you're going to have to get a genuine left-handed guitar.
Prescott_Player is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2013, 04:48 AM   #8
Captaincranky
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prescott_Player
If the saddle is on an angle in the bridge, that would be a problem, because that's a part of the compensation strategy.

Check your intonation by tuning each open string to the standard note, then see what happens as you play each note going up the fretboard. If they start to go high or low, then you obviously have problems.

Most guitars have slight intonation issues... but if it's quite pronounced, then there's no easy way to correct it, and you're going to have to get a genuine left-handed guitar.
I think TS is concerned about getting the E string off the 1st fret, before he tackles the finer points.

BTW, who's going to pay for the left handed guitar he's "going to have to get"?

Last edited by Captaincranky : 04-24-2013 at 04:49 AM.
Captaincranky is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-25-2013, 02:34 AM   #9
Prescott_Player
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Yeah, I guess the nut is the place to start, if he's going to pursue the project.

About the cost, that's an interesting consideration... on the one hand, there's the cost of the left-handed guitar, which is usually a little higher than a righty... but on the other hand there's the cost of the righty, plus the new nut, probably a new saddle, and perhpas even re-locating the bridge. That sounds like the greater expense... even assuming he does all the labor himself.

Then we also could consider the re-sale value... a lefty that's stock holds it's value much better than a righty that's been, shall we say, "home modified"... and that's also presuming the modification comes off successfully. I've seen some cases where the end result is never quite satisfactory for one reason or another... and then there's no way to reverse it, and the value of the guitar is pretty well lost.

So my advice is if the person wants to do the project for personal pleasure, and understands that he may reduce the value of the guitar and perhaps the result will not be completely satisfactory, then by all means, go for it. It's a good way to learn.

But if the person just wants a good left-handed guitar, and is not particularly skilled at modifications or eager to put in the time and effort, then he should probably just sell the righty and buy a genuine lefty.
Prescott_Player is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-25-2013, 02:55 AM   #10
Captaincranky
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prescott_Player
About the cost, that's an interesting consideration... on the one hand, there's the cost of the left-handed guitar, which is usually a little higher than a righty... but on the other hand there's the cost of the righty, plus the new nut, probably a new saddle, and perhpas even re-locating the bridge. That sounds like the greater expense... even assuming he does all the labor himself.
We're looking at the situation from two different angles. Since Fender makes at least 2 true LH acoustics, I am uncertain about how he came to own the guitar. Bought it used, a gift, found it in an attic. It does make no sense for a lefty to walk into a store and buy a new RH instrument with a LH model available. I just reasoned past most of what you're saying below.

I personally would never, ever buy another right handed guitar and convert it. But, I have too many credit cards, and too much available time on my hands to scour the web for lefties. (I play LH, and once upon a time you had the choice of having an instrument custom built, or converting one. Things are quite a bit better nowadays).

Quote:
Originally Posted by Prescott_Player
Then we also could consider the re-sale value... a lefty that's stock holds it's value much better than a righty that's been, shall we say, "home modified"... and that's also presuming the modification comes off successfully. I've seen some cases where the end result is never quite satisfactory for one reason or another... and then there's no way to reverse it, and the value of the guitar is pretty well lost.

So my advice is if the person wants to do the project for personal pleasure, and understands that he may reduce the value of the guitar and perhaps the result will not be completely satisfactory, then by all means, go for it. It's a good way to learn.

But if the person just wants a good left-handed guitar, and is not particularly skilled at modifications or eager to put in the time and effort, then he should probably just sell the righty and buy a genuine lefty.
We could consider all of that and more. But, it seems the deed is already done. At least that's what I gleaned from TS's syntax. I could have gotten that wrong. But, if I didn't, your observations disguised as foresight are actually hindsight. And know what they say, "hindsight is 20/20".

Quote:
Originally Posted by EvilNabbya
I have a Acoustic Fender Guitar model #: IJ100S-NT
Now where the heck could I have possibly gotten the idea that he already owns this guitar?

I just formed the impression that TS is new to the instrument, somehow got his hands on this guitar, and wants to make the best of it. If he stays with it, I'm sure he won't undertake this nonsense again.

If TS has the money, if fact, not even too much money, here's damned near a whole website full of lefty guitars, starting at maybe $125.00 /free shipping :http://www.adirondackguitar.com/adk...tarsForSale.htm

And TBH, I'd rather have a $150.00 true LH guitar, that a $300.00 "frank-con-version". OTOH, a beginner playing down at the bottom of the neck, isn't really going to be affected too badly by intonation errors, without replacing the bridge, etc., etc,.

Last edited by Captaincranky : 04-25-2013 at 03:41 AM.
Captaincranky is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 05:05 PM.

Forum Archives / About / Terms of Use / Advertise / Contact / Ultimate-Guitar.Com © 2014
Powered by: vBulletin Version 3.0.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.