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Old 03-25-2013, 03:33 PM   #1
MultiM
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how to have ideas?

I really love instrumental metal and my favourite one is jeff loomis:


I can make solos easily and I always have new ideas for solos I've never faced any problem with that because I really have a lot of music(solos) in my head and learned a lot of solos that helped me to get here, but.....

when it comes to making riffs and power chords and these things I don't have any ideas I play my solos over clean parts but I really don't have any new ideas to make,

I don't want to listen to heavier stuff to get ideas is there any easier way?

how do you guys get inspired?
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Old 03-25-2013, 03:59 PM   #2
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Just put on distortion and go at it. Just play whatever. You know how you can make musical solos in your head? Just try thinking of one for a riff, or even play a solo part for a riff.

Listening to heavier stuff doesn't always construed a heavier riff or influence for a song. In one of my bands song, which is very punkish/alternative, I was inspired by Dream Theater and wrote a chorus based upon that.

Just go at it, have fun, if you don't like it, find something you do
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Old 03-25-2013, 04:49 PM   #3
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Just give it some good practice. There's no set way to come up with a guitar part, just try to play some power chord riffs in a weird time or something like that.
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Old 03-25-2013, 05:11 PM   #4
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A good way to come up with guitar parts is not to use a...guitar.Most of the times we are going through our usual...motions with the guitar in our hands...conventional wisdom is overpowering most of the times.Just imagine how a guitar part should sound...the be able to sing that imagined part and if you can do that then you ll be able to play it as well.You mind is a far better guitar player than your hands...guaranteed .
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Old 03-26-2013, 06:34 AM   #5
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thanks guys
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Old 03-28-2013, 12:06 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MultiM
how do you guys get inspired?
One thing that I've found to be of great benefit was to rid my house of all televisions. If you can't do that then I suggest you stop watching television (even online videos) for a period of time. At least a month.

I would also suggest you not listen to the radio or other multimedia for about a month as well. In both instances your mind isn't bombarded with garbage that would otherwise impede or hinder its natural processing, and your ability to create. Some of the best music ever created was prior to the radio and television. Most modern blues and rock were created before all of the electronic gadgets that seem to preoccupy most people these days. Much of the 1950s to 1970s blues\rock still holds its own and is superior to what is produced today in most instances.

Something that I've also found interesting is that when I'm doing some form of physical labor I am very often inspired with new ideas, or a solution to some problem that had been plaguing me for some time. I don't suggest digging ditches unless that's what you do for a living, but maybe you have a bicycle that you can take for a 10-20 mile ride. If so, take it out and work up a sweat. I think you'll be surprised at what comes to mind during such physical activity.

Last edited by HighspeedNazi : 03-28-2013 at 12:19 PM.
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Old 03-28-2013, 01:15 PM   #7
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Get a bongo drum or djembe and spend a few months learning the basics from some teach yourself dvds. It'll really help in understanding rhythms and time, without confusing the issue with pitch and melody. After a few months of practice you should pick up a solid rhythmic vocabulary and understand timing in patterns, much like you can learn scales in patterns. It will all translate directly into useful guitar work. I learned all my djenty syncopation by taking drum exercises and doing them on the guitar, and my riffing is much better since i started drumming

Last edited by innovine : 03-28-2013 at 01:17 PM.
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Old 03-28-2013, 02:39 PM   #8
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What? Let me get this straight, you can compose solo's, but you can't compose the rhythm parts that you're soloing over?

Sorry, but if you don't have the rhythm there, you aren't writing a solo. A solo's purpose is to compliment the rhythm section and provide a contrast to the rest of the song. If you don't have the rest of the song, all you have is a few random notes played together.

When you're playing these "solo's", what are you hearing in your head? Surely there must be something going on in there that makes you think the solo is working? If there isn't, you haven't written a solo yet, you're just playing a random jam session.

Rhythm doesn't have to be complex, even if all you do is think about the basic notes that would provide an appropriate backing that would be enough. Simply having one or two power chords playing behind your lead guitar would be plenty (depending on the solo), but until you can create a solo that actually compliments whatever you're writing it for you aren't doing it properly.
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Old 03-28-2013, 02:40 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MultiM
I really love instrumental metal and my favourite one is jeff loomis:


I can make solos easily and I always have new ideas for solos I've never faced any problem with that because I really have a lot of music(solos) in my head and learned a lot of solos that helped me to get here, but.....

when it comes to making riffs and power chords and these things I don't have any ideas I play my solos over clean parts but I really don't have any new ideas to make,

I don't want to listen to heavier stuff to get ideas is there any easier way?

how do you guys get inspired?

Reading your post, I had a few thoughts on your situation that came to mind immediately:

1.) If you're listening to a lot of Jeff Loomis and other instrumental metal, then it's more than likely that the majority of your listening focuses on lead lines over distorted riffs, which is what you feel most comfortable playing. If you want to branch out and start coming up with more ideas than just lead parts, you'll have to start listening to music that has the sort of ideas that you want to be writing.

If you want to get better at writing riffs, one way to help that passively is to listen to artists who consistently write and emphasize good riffs. If you want to stick to instrumental metal, I'd recommend you try out Cloudkicker's Beacons and Portmanteau.

2.) Another thing you can do that might help is learning about themes and motifs as musical devices. That way, if you come up with a great lead idea, you can try to figure out a riff that expresses a similar idea. That's something that a lot of instrumental guitarists seem to miss out on, which makes a lot of their songs sound like a loose collection of ideas instead of a consistent whole (which is one of my major criticisms of instrumental metal).

3.) I also recommend you learn to distinguish elitism disguised as advice (like HighspeedNazi's little spiel about blues/rock) from useful ideas (like deatho, Dreamdancer11, and innovine offered). Being able to distinguish good advice from bad is generally one of the most useful skills you can possibly acquire.
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Old 03-28-2013, 02:51 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by Geldin
3.) I also recommend you learn to distinguish elitism disguised as advice (like HighspeedNazi's little spiel about blues/rock) from useful ideas (like deatho, Dreamdancer11, and innovine offered). Being able to distinguish good advice from bad is generally one of the most useful skills you can possibly acquire.

If it worked for HighspeedNazi, it isn't bad advice. It may not work for you, but that doesn't mean it won't work for someone else
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Old 03-28-2013, 05:05 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by GaryBillington
If it worked for HighspeedNazi, it isn't bad advice. It may not work for you, but that doesn't mean it won't work for someone else

1.) Advice can be objectively bad even if it "works". Anecdotal support doesn't mean a whole lot.

2.) It wasn't the content of what he said so much as the context - he ignored TS's music taste and supplemented them with the assumption that he listened to "radio garbage". He then went on to claim that blues and rock are objectively better things to listen to for ideas. None of this addresses TS's belief that he's not good at writing metal riffs. (For the record, I've yet to encounter a genre more uselessly steeped in self-congratulatory tradition than blues. This coming from a fan of the genre)
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Old 03-28-2013, 07:57 PM   #12
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Actually he suggested NOT listening to the radio to avoid anyone else's tunes getting stuck in your head while you're trying to create your own. Yes, it was a subjective post, but then a person's creativitiy is a subjective subject.

I agree that the sentence about his opinion of older rock/blues compared to current music maybe wasn't necessary, but the rest of that paragraph had a point, that point being the more you get other influences out of your head, the more likely you are to create something original.

Like I said, if it works for him it's not bad advice - creation is a personal thing, so all opinions count to the same extent, but the only opinion which matters is your own.
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Old 03-28-2013, 10:04 PM   #13
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just a suggestion...but what inspires you when you are writing your solos? try using that for inspiration.... and it might sound a bit basic, but you could always just take whatever root key your solo is based around and use a I, IV, V, V pattern to write the rhythm with that root key then add a little flavor around that once you get a good progression you like....like i said, it will probably sound a bit basic at first, but if you are wanting to give your music a feel similar to Jeff Loomis, you kinda want the rhythm to "disappear" into the background anyway... hope this helps
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Old 03-28-2013, 11:29 PM   #14
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If learning solos helped you to play solos, wouldn't the same be true about rhythm guitar?

Also, I too thought HighSpeedNazi's advice was a bit elitist.
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Old 03-30-2013, 07:42 PM   #15
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The thing for me is that the more I try to come up with something, the more I fail to get anything good out of the guitar. The best things actually come up to me when I just put the guitar down and listen to something completely different. I used to play in a post-hardcore band (think Refused or At The Drive In) and most of the best ideas I had came from casual moments where I would listen to old post-war blues, or stuff like django rehinardt.

In the end I was fascinated by some qualities of those sounds and I ended up trying my own interpretation of it in my own music. What I came up with in the end sounded nothing like old blues or manouche, but the thing is that I maybe picked up some chords or riff that for me was absolutely brand new and put it into a completely different context. Diversity always helps, but you dont have to force it :-)
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Old 04-02-2013, 05:22 AM   #16
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Theory may be what you need.
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