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Old Today, 03:56 PM   #40661
TNfootballfan62
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Originally Posted by mmolteratx
Yea, not even remotely comparable. EE unemployment is around 2% right now, and that's a record high. Median salary is mid-high 5 figures starting out, and most companies are happy to move you up quickly if you're good at what you do, from what I hear at least. A master's or PhD brings median salary to right around $100k. The only thing a history or English degree is good for is getting you into law school or teaching.

If you're good at math (and enjoy it), or you're good at formal logic, EE may be for you. If not, I've seen too many people flunk out or move to business, and I was almost one of them before I decided that it was exactly what I wanted to do.


Yeah, as much as I'd like to suggest everyone get into EE, frankly, it's not for everyone. If you go into it unprepared, it probably won't end well. That being said, if you like it and you can swing it, it'll be a great path to a good career.
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Old Today, 04:11 PM   #40662
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Yeah lol, I just wanted to put it as nicely as possible. Law interests me but I probably would never enjoy being a lawyer. I would most certainly go into teaching if I went that route.

I don't particularly enjoy math, but I am good at it, and I'm interested in EE. I feel like if I were to get that deep into discovering why the math is so important and how it applies to engineering, I'd enjoy it more than I ever did in high school. I figured I'd start by taking a couple math courses either starting next winter or spring, and just see how it goes.

Obviously the end goal would be to get a degree/have it lead into a career, but I mostly want to do it to challenge myself. History/english doesn't challenge my brain at all I'm doing fairly well right now so there's no rush, if I take one math class and rekindle my apathy for it, I'll know not to pursue it
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Old Today, 05:09 PM   #40663
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Originally Posted by CL/\SH
Yeah lol, I just wanted to put it as nicely as possible. Law interests me but I probably would never enjoy being a lawyer. I would most certainly go into teaching if I went that route.

I don't particularly enjoy math, but I am good at it, and I'm interested in EE. I feel like if I were to get that deep into discovering why the math is so important and how it applies to engineering, I'd enjoy it more than I ever did in high school. I figured I'd start by taking a couple math courses either starting next winter or spring, and just see how it goes.

Obviously the end goal would be to get a degree/have it lead into a career, but I mostly want to do it to challenge myself. History/english doesn't challenge my brain at all I'm doing fairly well right now so there's no rush, if I take one math class and rekindle my apathy for it, I'll know not to pursue it


There are very few lawyers who actually enjoy being lawyers. I can probably think of 1 or 2 that I personally know off hand out of the literally dozens that I know. The rest either do it for the money, or don't make enough money to support themselves during a career change and are stuck with it.

There's also a difference between being good at math pre college (which is essentially based on rote memorization), and then being good at real math, which requires considerably more critical thinking and a real understanding of the content. The difficulty level ramps up significantly, and can ramp up even more so if you're at one of those evil schools that require engineers to take proof based math courses. Personally, I don't think the math stuff is that bad, but I know a lot of people struggle with vector calc and differential equations in particular, which are completely different from anything I did before engineering.

The experience is (obviously) completely different than history/English, though for me, that's a huge plus. English is far too subjective and open ended at times, and history undergrad is basically rote memorization and a bit of writing, both of which are things I hate.

But yea, spending a semester or two in engineering, or even dropping in on some classes, shouldn't be too huge of a waste. Though if by that point it doesn't click, I'd say switch. AFAIK, I'm the only one to make the switch to business and then come back and do considerably better.

Also, a lot of engineering dudes are obnoxious. Be ready for serious neckbeardage.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TNfootballfan62
Yeah, as much as I'd like to suggest everyone get into EE, frankly, it's not for everyone. If you go into it unprepared, it probably won't end well. That being said, if you like it and you can swing it, it'll be a great path to a good career.


Yea, it could've ended really badly for me. Though it's funny. I was talking to one of my better profs yesterday about grad school, and when I asked if he had any suggestions on schools to look into, he threw out stuff like Stanford, MIT, Georgia Tech, etc. assuming based on my performance in his class, I wouldn't have any real problem getting into those programs. Then I let him know about my freshman year/stint in business and he couldn't believe it.

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TBH, I think I want all programming elements

I've been delving into coding more and more at my job and have come to really enjoy it. I think it's the most closely related to the field I'm in now, and the pay associated with it is ridiculously high, which is certainly nice


Weirdo.

Though I guess you get to skip calc that way. But then you have to deal with discrete math.
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Old Today, 05:23 PM   #40664
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mmolteratx
There are very few lawyers who actually enjoy being lawyers. I can probably think of 1 or 2 that I personally know off hand out of the literally dozens that I know. The rest either do it for the money, or don't make enough money to support themselves during a career change and are stuck with it.

There's also a difference between being good at math pre college (which is essentially based on rote memorization), and then being good at real math, which requires considerably more critical thinking and a real understanding of the content. The difficulty level ramps up significantly, and can ramp up even more so if you're at one of those evil schools that require engineers to take proof based math courses. Personally, I don't think the math stuff is that bad, but I know a lot of people struggle with vector calc and differential equations in particular, which are completely different from anything I did before engineering.

The experience is (obviously) completely different than history/English, though for me, that's a huge plus. English is far too subjective and open ended at times, and history undergrad is basically rote memorization and a bit of writing, both of which are things I hate.

But yea, spending a semester or two in engineering, or even dropping in on some classes, shouldn't be too huge of a waste. Though if by that point it doesn't click, I'd say switch. AFAIK, I'm the only one to make the switch to business and then come back and do considerably better.

Also, a lot of engineering dudes are obnoxious. Be ready for serious neckbeardage.



Yea, it could've ended really badly for me. Though it's funny. I was talking to one of my better profs yesterday about grad school, and when I asked if he had any suggestions on schools to look into, he threw out stuff like Stanford, MIT, Georgia Tech, etc. assuming based on my performance in his class, I wouldn't have any real problem getting into those programs. Then I let him know about my freshman year/stint in business and he couldn't believe it.



Weirdo.

Though I guess you get to skip calc that way. But then you have to deal with discrete math.


Yeah, math was "easiest" for me when I got to vector calc and and differential equations. I think a solid mathematical way of thinking is more important than any strict math skill. Understanding what a derivative is or what an integral is in order to understand fundamentally why things work the way they work, rather than being able to mechanically crank through all of them. Though you will need sharp algebra skills to get through most homework.
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Old Today, 05:31 PM   #40665
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mmolteratx
Weirdo.

Though I guess you get to skip calc that way. But then you have to deal with discrete math.

Software Engineering at ASU still requires Calc II & Differential Equations, or just Calc III. Even Computer Science does.
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Old Today, 05:34 PM   #40666
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Thanks for the input dude. I have a few friends from hs that have gone into ME, and they've been helpful as well. They all made that same point of math just becoming a completely different beast the further you go. One of my friends in particular had such a tough time juggling the difficulty of it and her job that she switched to business (I'd never be a business major, only thing I'm less likely to do is get into law).

That actually interests me; my problem with calculus and the like in hs was that it was so redundant and boring that I had a hard time staying awake. I'm sure my eating/sleeping habits contributed to that though I've learned that there are awful neckbeards in just about every facet of learning and life, though I can imagine engineer neckbeards being on the worse end of the spectrum I also have an uncle that works as an engineer that I can look up to for advice. He happens to be the one that beat prostate cancer

I'll definitely try a few courses out when the time comes to go back. Right now I'm deciding whether to move a few hours south to be close to a 4 year, or if I should go to the community college in my area. If I move south it'll be like a 10 minute walk, here I'd have a 30 minute commute. Leaning towards moving for that reason and the fact that the music scene is much more active down there
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Old Today, 05:40 PM   #40667
mmolteratx
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Originally Posted by MatrixClaw
Software Engineering at ASU still requires Calc II & Differential Equations, or just Calc III. Even Computer Science does.


Yea, all you need here is an intro differential calc course, IIRC.

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Originally Posted by TNfootballfan62
Yeah, math was "easiest" for me when I got to vector calc and and differential equations. I think a solid mathematical way of thinking is more important than any strict math skill. Understanding what a derivative is or what an integral is in order to understand fundamentally why things work the way they work, rather than being able to mechanically crank through all of them. Though you will need sharp algebra skills to get through most homework.


Yea, I actually liked the higher level math way better. The intro stuff is more mechanical, while as long as you know the basics of calculus, vector calc and diff eq are pretty conceptual.
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Old Today, 05:42 PM   #40668
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So, I think I've decided to do Software Engineering...?



That's what I currently do for work. Well, my job actually encompasses more in that my responsibilities combine process engineering, systems engineering, software engineering, implementation engineering, test engineering and database admin.

But yeah, I've been coding my ass off for the better part of this year at work. Developing standalone applications that work in parallel with the company ERP on the .NET platform (handling dynamic data from SQL Server).
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Old Today, 05:45 PM   #40669
TNfootballfan62
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Speaking of engineering, I've been having lots of productive meetings lately with our project sponsor. Things are really starting to take shape with my dissertation topic. I'm getting to do some really creative (read: infuriatingly difficult) circuit designs. So exciting.
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Old Today, 06:10 PM   #40670
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Originally Posted by mmolteratx
Yea, all you need here is an intro differential calc course, IIRC.

Yeah, they also still require 12 credits of science here.

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That's what I currently do for work. Well, my job actually encompasses more in that my responsibilities combine process engineering, systems engineering, software engineering, implementation engineering, test engineering and database admin.

But yeah, I've been coding my ass off for the better part of this year at work. Developing standalone applications that work in parallel with the company ERP on the .NET platform (handling dynamic data from SQL Server).

My friend is a Senior Programmer/Analyst for American Airlines and his job intrigues me. He's been helping me to learn some of the languages, to get a head start.
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Old Today, 06:37 PM   #40671
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You have to take physics 1/2 and chem here. Don't think there's anything else unrelated to CS in the sciences/math.
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Old Today, 06:42 PM   #40672
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You have to take physics 1/2 and chem here. Don't think there's anything else unrelated to CS in the sciences/math.

It's Physics 1 & 2 here and then you can take whatever other science you want for the rest of the credits
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Old Today, 06:42 PM   #40673
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EE I also found that math got better in college, mostly because you get to see where it becomes relevant. I don't think you need to like math, but you need to like problem solving, and understand the concepts behind Calc makes that SOOO much easier.
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Old Today, 06:52 PM   #40674
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ME major here

I haven't touched a math book in over 3 years, and got dumped into Calc III this semester. So far it's been fairly easy, and it's a hell of a lot easier than Calc II. Our prof throws in occasional Calc II problems on the homework and it's enough to keep you busy without making your head explode. I've had this prof since Calc I too, so that definitely helps
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