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Old 11-28-2012, 02:11 AM   #1
Faso
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Question about dimebag solos

Not sure if this is re right place to post this... Ive seen many of dimebag's solos and i see he many times uses notes that are absolutely out of the whatever scale hes playing, but they sound amazing! How does that happen? For example in Walk, at the beggining it looks pentatonic, then right away he picks a not which is outside. Fine, it might be the blue note, but then he goes

-12-14-----12-16----13---
---------15---------15----15b
------------------------------
------------------------------
---------------------------
----------------------------

Where the hell did that f# and g# come from? And it sounds great!
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Old 11-28-2012, 06:09 AM   #2
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dimebag was awesome.
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Old 11-28-2012, 06:18 AM   #3
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^ Very helpful man.

Excuse me OP, but i don't understand what you're asking.....
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Old 11-28-2012, 06:24 AM   #4
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They came from the person who played them, he knew what sound using those note would give him and he decided he wanted that sound, so he used those notes...it really is no more complicated than that.
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Old 11-28-2012, 06:48 AM   #5
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He didn't play in a scale, he played in a key. It doesn't matter what notes he play, whether they're in and out of key.
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Old 11-28-2012, 07:39 AM   #6
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You might find this lesson useful:



The short answer is, don't be afraid to use 'outside' notes and chromaticism. As guitar players we often get boxed in to shapes and patterns, but in reality you can use any of the 12 notes if they're played at the right time and in the right context! And it can sound really cool if you do.

Check out Marty Friedman's solos on Megadeth's Rust in Peace album, rarely is it obvious what scale he's using. Because he has no idea what scale or key he's in most of the time, he feels comfortable using any note he wants! A cool thing he often does is play a note that's completely dissonant, then bend it up to a chord tone (root, 3rd, 5th) and it gives the note a lot more character.

If you've studied intervals, it can also be helpful to notes related back to key center and you can find which sounds you like. Scale patterns are not just dots, each note has its own quality and flavor!

Here's another cool approach from Victor Wooten, I think it relates to the specific lick you were referring to as well - sliding from an outside note to a diatonic note.

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Old 11-28-2012, 08:10 AM   #7
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TS obviously never checked out the living marvel that goes by the name of Marty Friedman..
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Old 11-28-2012, 10:15 PM   #8
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Friedman is a beast. The eastern thing from Holy Wars was completely improvised, and random. Although, I feel that if you are going to play "out" you need to learn to play "in" first.

Kerry King, and Vernon Reid would be two guys who play in their own little worlds.

If you want to go even further out check out dodecahedral tone sets. That stuff is crazy.
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Old 12-02-2012, 05:56 PM   #9
Faso
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i actually heard a lot of friedman, and i was about to ask using him as an example
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Old 12-02-2012, 05:59 PM   #10
Faso
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChucklesMginty
You might find this lesson useful:



The short answer is, don't be afraid to use 'outside' notes and chromaticism. As guitar players we often get boxed in to shapes and patterns, but in reality you can use any of the 12 notes if they're played at the right time and in the right context! And it can sound really cool if you do.

Check out Marty Friedman's solos on Megadeth's Rust in Peace album, rarely is it obvious what scale he's using. Because he has no idea what scale or key he's in most of the time, he feels comfortable using any note he wants! A cool thing he often does is play a note that's completely dissonant, then bend it up to a chord tone (root, 3rd, 5th) and it gives the note a lot more character.

If you've studied intervals, it can also be helpful to notes related back to key center and you can find which sounds you like. Scale patterns are not just dots, each note has its own quality and flavor!

Here's another cool approach from Victor Wooten, I think it relates to the specific lick you were referring to as well - sliding from an outside note to a diatonic note.



extremely helpful, thanks!
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