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Old 03-05-2013, 01:40 AM   #21
Speedkills85
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I am 28 years old. I try to make the most of the time that I have. I can usually squeeze in at least two hours per day. I just enjoy the time and find I don't get bored or anything. When I first started guitar in my teens I had wanted to fool around too much even though I really liked the instrument. I find that as I've grown I've actually developed a far deeper appreciation to the guitar....I can spend hours and not get bored.

From what I had gathered it seemed that a lot of players started to become good around the 3 year mark. My friend has been playing since 2001 when we started and he shocked me by telling me he has never tried to attempt Pantera or Megadeth. These are the bands we were into back in the day that I was sure he'd tackle first. He was a fiend when he first got it, practiced all the time..I think he said as time went on he sort of picked up it less and less and even in between months (ala Kerry King). I plan on daily practice and I hope I can make progress in the next few years to where I am able to play in public if I'd like. It's more of a personal thing but I would like that ability.

I am working on one Segovia Scale per week, this week it's C. I am also gonna start incorporating one or two more scales, like Pentatonic. The rest of the time I spend doing chords and switching. I was able to get some of Come as you are by Nirvana and bits and pieces of other stuff but I am not really interested in songs at the moment. I don't know if this is the right or wrong approach but I had originally settled on just working on chords and scales for most of the year....and THEN attempt a song or two. When I took lessons in my teens the instructor had made us do simple songs a few weeks in but I can't help but think the time would be better spent on technique and playing chords and scales? What did/does everyone else do?

Last edited by Speedkills85 : 03-05-2013 at 01:47 AM.
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Old 03-05-2013, 02:19 AM   #22
RyanStorm13
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I think quality time beats overall time.

If I practice the same material too long, I don't move forward. So you need to either get lessons or follow some video lessons cause you don't get good by not doing what works. Yeah can actually do just about any way, and it will work, but nothing beats actual lessons, and video lessons works cause you got places like this to ask all you stupid questions...instead of to a real instructor.

I define my definition of good, to material you can play. If one guy can just grab a guitar and play Cocaine, but the other busts out some classical music sheets and plays moonlight sonata, its easier to say whos better at what, than who is better overall.


No certain guitar is gonna make you better. The quality of things these days are so good, that you could turn any guitar into what ever sound you want through a computer of effects.

I really don't have any actual tips for what to study and what not to. Scales and chords don't mean nothing if you don't use them for anything. I don't even bother cause I can just look at charts I have made for chords, and scales are insanley easy to memorize if you know piano and where all the whole notes are on the guitar neck.

I would just treat the guitar like an instrument, like if you were trying to become a Violen Major or Piano Major. Or do it 60's style, and drop a lot of weed and acid, and just jam all day and live in London. Any which way works.
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Old 03-05-2013, 06:44 AM   #23
rmaguitar
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Without getting all Zen about it, I think it's all about the journey. I know fantastic players who think they are rubbish and awful players who think they're Hendrix - I wouldn't want to be either one..

Just enjoy learning and growing and as you look in the rear view mirror you'll become encouraged with your accomplishments. And never let how well you do something become your identity - there is ALWAYS someone better than you..
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Old 03-10-2013, 08:46 AM   #24
Renots024Young
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Lots of hours. You'll know when you've put in the time to be where you wanna be. Just set your own goals and don't let anyone discourage you
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Old 03-10-2013, 09:06 AM   #25
steven seagull
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Speedkills85
I am working on one Segovia Scale per week, this week it's C. I am also gonna start incorporating one or two more scales, like Pentatonic. The rest of the time I spend doing chords and switching. I was able to get some of Come as you are by Nirvana and bits and pieces of other stuff but I am not really interested in songs at the moment. I don't know if this is the right or wrong approach but I had originally settled on just working on chords and scales for most of the year....and THEN attempt a song or two. When I took lessons in my teens the instructor had made us do simple songs a few weeks in but I can't help but think the time would be better spent on technique and playing chords and scales? What did/does everyone else do?

Again you're trying too hard and placing time limits on things.

Learning "a scale a week" is pointless, honestly.

All you're doing there is painfully memorising a bunch of seemingly arbitrary patterns of dots, most of which are pretty much exactly the same thing. Scales are useful, but learning scales for scales sake isn't - if you want to work on scales do them properly and you'll get the most benefit from them.

Learn the notes on your fretboard first, then as far as theory goes work on the major scale from the ground up. Learn about intervals and start getting yourself used to how they sound, then learn how to construct the major scale. Learn how it's put together and the notes it uses but more importantly learn how it sounds because THAT'S the whole reason you learn scales.

Equally the whole point of learning to play the guitar is to, well, PLAY the thing so you need to be playing songs from the outset. When it comes to figuring out how "good" you are at the guitar there's only one measure and that's how good you are at playing music on the thing - nobody is ever going to be impressed or interested in how good you are at practicing, and you shouldn't place too much emphasis on it. Practice is a means to an end, not the end itself and you need to maintain a balance of both practicing AND playing if you want to progress effectively.
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Old 03-10-2013, 09:33 AM   #26
vayne92
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Quote:
Originally Posted by steven seagull
Again you're trying too hard and placing time limits on things.

Learning "a scale a week" is pointless, honestly.

All you're doing there is painfully memorising a bunch of seemingly arbitrary patterns of dots, most of which are pretty much exactly the same thing. Scales are useful, but learning scales for scales sake isn't - if you want to work on scales do them properly and you'll get the most benefit from them.

Learn the notes on your fretboard first, then as far as theory goes work on the major scale from the ground up. Learn about intervals and start getting yourself used to how they sound, then learn how to construct the major scale. Learn how it's put together and the notes it uses but more importantly learn how it sounds because THAT'S the whole reason you learn scales.

Equally the whole point of learning to play the guitar is to, well, PLAY the thing so you need to be playing songs from the outset. When it comes to figuring out how "good" you are at the guitar there's only one measure and that's how good you are at playing music on the thing - nobody is ever going to be impressed or interested in how good you are at practicing, and you shouldn't place too much emphasis on it. Practice is a means to an end, not the end itself and you need to maintain a balance of both practicing AND playing if you want to progress effectively.


Listen to this man.

Knowing every scale on the planet wont matter if you don't understand why they are the way they are and don't know how to apply them. As he said you're just learning "arbitrary patterns of dots". I'm almost positive that for you as an individual at your current stage of your guitar journey that you have no idea of the theory behind each scale you're learning. You're better off just learning songs or grinding to a metronome if you want to improve. Learning scales wont help.

I personally don't have the musical knowledge i wish i had and i don't find a need to learn scales because i know i wont apply them to my playing.

I am however currently learning the E Phrygian dominant scale because the Egyptian-esque exotic sound it provides really intrigues me. I've been improvising in that scale for nearly a week now and recording myself every day.
As Steven Seagull said learn how it sounds. I don't even have to look at the scale notes to know if i'm playing it wrong because the second i hit a wrong note i know it doesn't sound right and that it's not in the scale.

As for how i practice these days.. I hardly properly practice technique anymore. I lost that feeling i had in my first few years of playing when i always thought "I suck, i can't shred like this. I can't play this song. Everyone else is better than me. Oh my god this guys only been playing a couple years and he's so good". I don't care about time anymore or how well i can or can't do one thing or bother comparing myself to others. The most important thing i've learnt in the last year or two is that it's all about having fun. If i'm not having fun why the **** am i playing guitar?
These days i'm exploring many different acoustic genres from funk to as i said Egyptian/Spanish music lol. I'm also trying to improve my percussive techniques on acoustic and try to incorporate that into my playing. When i do go back to my metal roots and whip out my Drop A# RG i usually **** around and improvise or play along to some of my favourite music. I'm not going to bother playing things i don't enjoy. If you enjoy learning scales every week though then i suppose that's cool. You'd just be a little crazy haha.
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Last edited by vayne92 : 03-10-2013 at 09:44 AM.
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