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Old 12-11-2012, 06:46 AM   #1
M_G
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Live vs Recorded?

Hello everyone,

When I sing live through a mic and can actually hear my vocals coming back at me through a PA or an amp, I like the way my voice sounds. This isn't my 'inside head voice' it's live and what the speakers are projecting back to me.

However, when I RECORD my voice I absolutely despise it. Now firstly there's a couple of things, I use the BOSS br600 to record my voice and have a very, very cheap microphone which I plug into it. The recorded vocals make me sound 10 years younger if that makes sense, perhaps a little nasally even.

Now my question is, one person has told me that the voice I am hearing coming OUT of the PA/AMP when I sing live is my true voice, and the other is saying the recorded voice is my true voice.

It's making me get a little bit disheartened, as I feel like the recorded vocals are what people are hearing when I sing live, when surely we are hearing exactly the same things because we are listening through the same speakers no?


(please understand, I am not talking about the voice I hear in my own head this is my LIVE vocals).

Thanks for any input guys
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Old 12-11-2012, 10:01 AM   #2
jinsu2301
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Are you using the same mic for PA and recording?
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Old 12-11-2012, 10:09 AM   #3
M_G
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Nope, the mic I use live is a Shure SM58, for the recordings it's something I got for 1 when I was about 13 at a junk shop. Says it all really XD

The point is though, there is such a drastic difference between my live voice coming out of the speakers..
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Old 12-11-2012, 10:09 AM   #4
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Try turning up your headphones. The more they resemble the live sound the more you'll push your voice.

Also, what mic are you using to record?
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Old 12-11-2012, 10:13 AM   #5
SHaun Steel
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Hi M_G.

Are you talking about a recorded live desk mix or when you record at a studio or at home?
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Old 12-11-2012, 10:50 AM   #6
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I think this has to do more with psychology than microphones.
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Old 12-11-2012, 11:03 AM   #7
M_G
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SHaun Steel
Hi M_G.

Are you talking about a recorded live desk mix or when you record at a studio or at home?


When I record at home using my Boss br600

When I am live the vocals are directly through an amp or speaker, no live mixing as of yet.
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Old 12-11-2012, 11:37 AM   #8
SHaun Steel
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Ahh gotcha now.

I know exactly how you are feeling about this as i went through the same thing about 10yrs ago wen i fronted one of the bands i was in. My voice was and still is very mediocre at best but always came off better live than when i had to record in the studio

The whole live vocal performance vs the recorded one are two totally different animals. Lets start with the live performance. The live performance is in a setting where you and your band are all there together putting it all on the line with everything you have. There is more energy involved the volume is blasting so you tend to really let it rip more. The other thing with live performance is that it is a one take representation of what you and your band sound like. When the song/show is over the performance is left on the stage.

The studio vocal performance is completely different, weather your recording as a band in a studio or doing everything DIY yourself at home. It's a more isolated affair there's no big PA, flashing lights or a massive crowd hanging on every word you say. It's just your engineer at the helm and you in a dry room with a mic in front you so it's a very lonely place to be. Technique and mixing tricks is where it's at now as every little nuance is picked up. If volume is a issue when your tracking for example you have a big powerful voice and your having problems hearing the backing instruments even though they are maxed out before you yourself have hit full power, send all the instruments to a bus and put a limiter on the to get more juice and allow for more headroom. The thing i do with singers who record with me especially the ones who don't have the best technique is we do lots of layering. Layering and panning can make the smallest of voices sound absolutely huge. Using Hass style delays instantly fatten up and widen vocal tracks. It's all about experimentation and the joy of everything the digital age has to offer the possibilities are endless.

Last edited by SHaun Steel : 12-11-2012 at 11:44 AM.
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Old 12-11-2012, 11:54 AM   #9
M_G
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What a fantastic reply thanks so much Shaun.

You are completely right about the live performance being a 'one take' thing, and I suppose because of the adrenaline you simply do not have time to analyse every little detail. When I listen back to a recorded track, I literally analyse EVERYTHING down to how each syllable sounds.

One of my main problems is getting the volume of my vocals to sit well with everything else. It always feels like it's behind the instruments or it's over riding the instruments. But like you said, that's something experimentation (i.e learning) can help with.

Thanks again
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Old 12-11-2012, 12:39 PM   #10
SHaun Steel
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Quote:
Originally Posted by M_G
.One of my main problems is getting the volume of my vocals to sit well with everything else. It always feels like it's behind the instruments or it's over riding the instruments.


You should check out some automation tutorials there's a ton of stuff on youtube about this. I'm not versed with the device you are using so I'm not sure if it has an automation function, wouldn't hurt to check the manual on that front. In a nutshell automation lets you create hit points on a track so you can increase or decrease the volume, pan or switch effects on and off. So pulling your guitars back a little when your vocals or solo's are to be at the forefront then push them back up when not.



If your Boss unit does not have this function one other option would be to get yourself a usb card reader. This way you can get all your stems tracks from the Boss onto a pc or mac. Then you could download Presonus studio one free and import all your files to that and automate from there.

http://studioone.presonus.com/free/

Last edited by SHaun Steel : 12-11-2012 at 12:44 PM.
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