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Old 01-10-2013, 03:16 PM   #1
ShameofaNation
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Drum programming. Where to start?

I'm getting to the point where I'd like to start getting songs I've written completely recorded. I've got everything handled except drums.

I have a simple drum set in my music area for when I'm jamming with people, but for three reasons I'm not going to use them in my music. They don't sound that good, I'm an awful drummer, and I can imagine buying 3-5 more mics/stands and a mixer would pretty damn expensive.

The fact that one of my favorite bands, Ween, used a drum machine for their first three albums has further convinced me I should look into some sort of drum sampling program or something of that sort.

I've looked at EZDrummer and so far I like what I hear but I want to be sure that it's really all it's cracked up to be first, and also if there is anything better out there I should consider. I know absolutely nothing about this stuff so I need all the advice I can get.
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Old 01-10-2013, 03:49 PM   #2
AJScott
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If you wanna spend mad dolla, get Superior Drummer. It's by ToonTrack same people that did EZDrummer and is better, i've got SD and I can tell you. It's beautiful.

What I do is, lay down my guitar track. I then use an MPD26 (Midi drum pad device) and then program the kick drum and snare just as a rough idea for beats then use the inbuilt piano roll in Reaper to finish the rest of my drums.
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Old 01-10-2013, 03:51 PM   #3
Quillen.Jeff
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You can start by familiarizing yourself with a D.A.W. (digital audio workstation) and electronic music.

If you are aiming for a realistic drum sound, listen to some downtempo artists to get an idea of how it sounds.
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Old 01-10-2013, 04:31 PM   #4
Artemis Entreri
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Superior drummer is great. Another option which I tend to use is taking real drum sounds and stringing them together. I've built a library over a while of samples of individual drum sounds at various dynamics with various techniques so I can string together a track. SD basically does this for you, however.
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Old 01-10-2013, 04:59 PM   #5
EpiExplorer
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What I do: get guitar pro/tuxguitar, compose your drum bits (fairly easy to do), export as MIDI, import to your DAW, set EZdrummer as an instrument track, all good. Would also recommend Superior Drummer, but EZdrummer is still good, but always needs expansions.
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Old 01-10-2013, 05:53 PM   #6
TheFly_1990
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I use a combo of EZDrummer, Superior Drummer, and my own sample kits in FL Studio
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Old 01-10-2013, 06:37 PM   #7
SHaun Steel
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There is literaly no need at all to be writting drum parts in guitar pro or tux it can all be done in the DAW with any of the afore mentioned drum VSTI's. Ezdrummer, Superior drummer and Addictive drums all have hundreds of great very usable midi loops that can be dragged straight onto to your DAW workspace right off the bat. You should be knocking out out drum beats silly quick once you get any of these platforms. If the loops dont quite fit your song as they are just go into the piano roll and fix to your needs it's really simple.
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Old 01-10-2013, 07:08 PM   #8
EpiExplorer
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SHaun Steel
There is literaly no need at all to be writting drum parts in guitar pro or tux it can all be done in the DAW with any of the afore mentioned drum VSTI's. Ezdrummer, Superior drummer and Addictive drums all have hundreds of great very usable midi loops that can be dragged straight onto to your DAW workspace right off the bat. You should be knocking out out drum beats silly quick once you get any of these platforms. If the loops dont quite fit your song as they are just go into the piano roll and fix to your needs it's really simple.



Then I'll explain my point further:

Loops are fine if you're lazy or dont want perfection from your efforts. But composing your own rhythms, to how you want it, is much more fulfilling than buying a load of pre-arranged MIDI rhythms from other artists, but everyone has their creative control.

In Tux/GP, the velocity is set to a consistent level throughout the track. This is affected by ghost noting, fade ins etc. When composing first hand into a DAW, your velocities will be all over the place, and correcting them to sound nice with EZ/SD is an extra 2 or 3 hours of wasted time. With the consistent level of velocities from imported MIDI, you can block-edit the velocities easily, especialy for quieter bits, and I'm sure most other DAWs have a controllable randomize function for velocity so you can add subtle changes to give a humanized feel while also being in time. I've used this method in FL studio, Logic and Pro Tools and it saves so much time.

Another problem is quantizing. Like velocity editing, using a pencil tool/grab and move tool can lead to rhythmical imperfections, and takes a lot of time to arrange precisely, especially when copy pasting sections for repeats. Snapping to a grid works sometimes, but its fickle unless your drum bits are really simple. In imported Tux/GP, the MIDI is as precise as is possible, and then its an easy process of editing and not taking forever to figure out how to incorporate triplets over 4/4 on a piano roll.

Also, most MIDI editors in DAW's I've used tend to be visually annoying and even distracting, they work best with pre-arranged MIDI in my experience. Then again I dont compose phat b33tz for a living.
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Hi. Can someone tell me which guitars are real 24 fret guitars and which are just 22 fret guitars with 2 extra frets added on?



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Eip pls
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