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Old 01-15-2014, 04:03 PM   #1
Navi_96
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Baritones in hard rock and heavy metal?

Hey everybody,
as a guy who mostly listens to the heavy stuff (which seems to be full of tenor singers), I find there seem to be a lot of tenors or high baritones as singers. I'd like to listen to some lower baritones who fulfill this role in bands, but I know of almost none.

I know Geoff Tate of Queensryche is a baritone, and then there's Axl Rose obviously... but he's a story for himself, the poor soul.
If anyone can point me to more baritones in the world of heavy music, I'd be very grateful.
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Old 01-16-2014, 05:23 AM   #2
KrisHQ
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A lot of people are baritones. Definitely more baritones than tenors.
But it also depends if you're using the classical or modern way to determine, and I assume you're using the modern (solely vocal-range).
There are singers like James Hetfield, frontman of Breaking Benjamin, Roy Khan, Myles Kennedy and Eddie Vedder. All are baritones, just either in the high or low end of the spectre.
When determining vocal-ranges it's not about what notes people can reach, but how fast they start to mix.
For Tenors there are people like Steve Walsh, Robert Plant and Michael Mills.
Michael Mills is an up-coming vocalist who sings on the newest Ayreon Album and has made this video, which is very impressive:
He is consistently hitting melodies around F5. Although he is using a lot of falsetto, his ability to pitch in that register is a pretty clear indication of being a tenor

Last edited by KrisHQ : 01-16-2014 at 05:28 AM.
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Old 01-16-2014, 06:09 PM   #3
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^Roy Khan and Myles Kennedy are closer to low tenors actually.

Most metal singers are somewhere at the low tenor/high baritone area. Which also happens to be not much higher than where the typical male voice lies. Few are real tenors. You can find a lot of high or even standard baritones in metal but low baritones are a bit more rare. I'll add Warrel Dane, Matt Barlow(perhaps closer to standard), Peter Steele, Neil Fallon.
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Old 01-16-2014, 06:17 PM   #4
Navi_96
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Thanks for the suggestions guys, I'll be sure to check these peeps out when I have a few hours. I've heard Myles Kennedy though, and I'd also say he is more on the tenor side (albeit low).
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Old 01-16-2014, 06:31 PM   #5
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You could argue that Myles is a low tenor, but he could also be classified as a high baritone
He mixes fairly early in his register, but is able to sing high due to great technique.
If you compare him to an actual tenor like David Phelps (youtube: End Of The Beginning or As I Am by him) you will see what I mean. He is a tenor, and if you compare an A4 from David with Myles it's almost two different notes
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Old 01-17-2014, 05:39 AM   #6
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Yes, it's sometimes hard to type those "somewhere in the middle" voices. They can be disguised to imitate either higher or lower voices. If they also add effects to their voice it's even harder.
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Old 02-01-2014, 03:42 AM   #7
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Isn't Corey Taylor from slipknot/stone sour a bartione? I know he has a decent range, but I'm pretty sure that's where he falls naturally.
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Old 02-01-2014, 05:27 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johnturner9
Isn't Corey Taylor from slipknot/stone sour a bartione? I know he has a decent range, but I'm pretty sure that's where he falls naturally.

Yes
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Old 02-02-2014, 07:36 AM   #9
Rocknrolla35
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Blackie Lawless is a baritone. Don't know, which baritone exactly. Could be cavalier-baritone., could be high baritone, who knows.
James Hetfield is an OBVIOUS baritone too. Perhaps even a bass-baritone.
Ken Tamplin is a high baritone.
Bon Scott could be a baritone too.
Who else...?
Gene Simmons is an obvious bass-baritone.

Marylin Manson is a bari too, i think.

And then there's Lemmy....
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Old 02-02-2014, 07:46 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KrisHQ
He is consistently hitting melodies around F5. Although he is using a lot of falsetto, his ability to pitch in that register is a pretty clear indication of being a tenor



Not necessarily.

Many baritones can hit an F5 too. It just doesn't come as easy, as it does for tenors and countertenors. Even a well-trained bass singer can reach as high as, say, G5. Look up Billy Gibbons(ZZ Top) in The Range Place, and take a listen to him singing. You'll see.

Besides, falsetto is just a very breathy head voice. I can't say that it's a 100% true fact, but as much as i know, many untrained singers, try to hit high notes with a falsetto. Given that that guy hit that F5 with a falsetto, i'd say there is a good chance he is a regular/high baritone.

An overly breathy singing voice scrapes the vocal cords with the air that's passing through them, and damages the cords by the way.
So think more than once about hether you want to use falsetto, or not.

And if you're untrained, better get some GOOD singing lessons, before you've hurt yourself, or become isillusioned by the constant obstacles in your progress.

Last edited by Rocknrolla35 : 02-02-2014 at 07:49 AM.
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Old 02-02-2014, 07:11 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rocknrolla35
Not necessarily.

Many baritones can hit an F5 too. It just doesn't come as easy, as it does for tenors and countertenors. Even a well-trained bass singer can reach as high as, say, G5. Look up Billy Gibbons(ZZ Top) in The Range Place, and take a listen to him singing. You'll see.

Besides, falsetto is just a very breathy head voice. I can't say that it's a 100% true fact, but as much as i know, many untrained singers, try to hit high notes with a falsetto. Given that that guy hit that F5 with a falsetto, i'd say there is a good chance he is a regular/high baritone.

An overly breathy singing voice scrapes the vocal cords with the air that's passing through them, and damages the cords by the way.
So think more than once about hether you want to use falsetto, or not.

And if you're untrained, better get some GOOD singing lessons, before you've hurt yourself, or become isillusioned by the constant obstacles in your progress.



First off, tenors don't "easily" hit an F5, it is VERY rare to find a tenor that gets into that range..unless we're talking falsetto.

If we're talking falsetto, baritones and basses generally have a better sounding falsetto than tenors, because their voices naturally have more harmonic content.
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Old 02-03-2014, 07:08 PM   #12
Navi_96
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rocknrolla35
Besides, falsetto is just a very breathy head voice.


Um... No. Head voice happens when your voice resonates in parts of the head, yes, but head voice is still part of the modal register (the vocal folds still connect to produce sound). With falsetto, no such physical connection occurs. And the change in the timbre between falsetto and head voice is really obvious, so it isn't just a result of making it breathy. And using falsetto sometimes shouldn't be unhealthy, it's overdoing it that is.

As for the "ability to pitch" at F5... as a low baritone (dramatic, probably) I have went up to easy falsetto G5's and strained G#5's, and I'm not very trained in my upper registers so I think that has yet to go up a minor third if the stars align nicely :P . So I guess not only a tenor is able to produce those notes...
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Old 02-15-2014, 02:16 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tyson2011
First off, tenors don't "easily" hit an F5, it is VERY rare to find a tenor that gets into that range..unless we're talking falsetto.

If we're talking falsetto, baritones and basses generally have a better sounding falsetto than tenors, because their voices naturally have more harmonic content.


Uhh, are you sure a tenor can't easily hit an F5?
I don't think so. As a general rule, tenor's range is at least C3-C5.
Given that it's just a classical generalization, and that many singers have a range of more than 2 octaves, it's safe to assume, that even many untraied tenors can reach an F5. So often, for an undertrained tenor, an F5 shouldn't be a big problem.
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Old 02-15-2014, 02:21 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Navi_96
Um... No. Head voice happens when your voice resonates in parts of the head, yes, but head voice is still part of the modal register (the vocal folds still connect to produce sound). With falsetto, no such physical connection occurs. And the change in the timbre between falsetto and head voice is really obvious, so it isn't just a result of making it breathy. And using falsetto sometimes shouldn't be unhealthy, it's overdoing it that is.

As for the "ability to pitch" at F5... as a low baritone (dramatic, probably) I have went up to easy falsetto G5's and strained G#5's, and I'm not very trained in my upper registers so I think that has yet to go up a minor third if the stars align nicely :P . So I guess not only a tenor is able to produce those notes...


What do you mean "vocal cords don't connect during a falsetto"?
I still have a lot to learn, but what you said about voca cords during a falsetto doesn't seem to make sense.

By the way, who is your vocal coach?
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Old 02-15-2014, 02:24 PM   #15
Banjocal
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Attila Csihar for sure.
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Old 03-20-2014, 01:03 AM   #16
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This is mine, beats any other baritone 6 string on the market. New company from Texas called Jericho Guitars. Best components like Seymour Duncan Invaders, TonePro bridge, Grover Tuners, Graphtech nuts, D'addario strings, the whole deal, made like a BEAST. Feels like a regs guitar too, the Guitar World review of it really shows it off you can google it.

We tune a wholestep further down for live to presrve our singers voice, its the ONLY way to stay tight at those low tunings without it turning to MUD.

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