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Old 11-23-2012, 04:06 PM   #1
hahaha15
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delay

If youre micing a guitar with delay on it how do you get the delays to pick up easier?
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Old 11-23-2012, 05:51 PM   #2
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Turn up the volume & record the amp louder...
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Old 11-24-2012, 09:24 AM   #3
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Or, preferably, don't use a pedal/amp delay as you will not be able to alter it in the mix later when there is inevitably a problem with the level of the delay or the tonality etc. and instead use a delay plug-in or outboard delay that you can dial in to taste when you actually need it (i.e when you're mixing the track). I would never record a delay like that unless the guitarist was incredibly stubborn and refused to unplug his $100 Boss delay pedal.
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Old 12-03-2012, 10:23 PM   #4
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I disagree, I would say if you cannot get the tone or sound you want, don't begin recording yet. While using digtal effects afterwards is REALLY convenient, I would never use a plug-in over the sound of a high quality delay. Depends what delay you have, and I guess stubborness may apply... What delay are you using? If it can't be set to sound good in the mix, maybe you would be best without it.
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Old 12-03-2012, 10:27 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by head-case
I disagree, I would say if you cannot get the tone or sound you want, don't begin recording yet. While using digtal effects afterwards is REALLY convenient, I would never use a plug-in over the sound of a high quality delay. Depends what delay you have, and I guess stubborness may apply... What delay are you using? If it can't be set to sound good in the mix, maybe you would be best without it.

But how can you possibly know exactly what level the delay needs to be, the number of repetitions, the speed/time division of repetitions etc. before you actually come to mixing the track? Delay pedals are fine, live, but the lack of control they offer - relative to software plug-ins, and studio outboard delays - is very limiting, and so is the fact that you cannot alter them once they are recorded on (metaphorical, usually) tape.
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Old 12-03-2012, 10:37 PM   #6
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Well, I don't think the average listener is paying their fullest attention to the delay repeats and decays which are usually not right upfront and entirely noticable. I also don't like to think about music in that technologized way, wondering whether every single audible note lines up with 100% precision to grids or whatnot. I record in very old fashioned ways, that's just me. All I can say is that some things do not need to be picked through with the finest comb. I try to abolish computers as much as possible to be honest.
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Old 12-03-2012, 10:42 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by head-case
Well, I don't think the average listener is paying their fullest attention to the delay repeats and decays which are usually not right upfront and entirely noticable. I also don't like to think about music in that technologized way, wondering whether every single audible note lines up with 100% precision to grids or whatnot. I record in very old fashioned ways, that's just me. All I can say is that some things do not need to be picked through with the finest comb. I try to abolish computers as much as possible to be honest.

Maybe your disapproval of computers in the recording process to some degree, is the reason for your personal preference then, and not a result of it?

I mean, surely the ability to tailor something with far more flexibility and allowing you to truly make the song into what you hear in your head, is an exciting and overwhelmingly-useful concept?

Anyway, all I'll say is that we clearly disagree so I won't try to sway you any further than saying that what I'm talking about isn't a case of getting machine-like precision. The difference between a quarter-note delay and an eighth-note delay is pretty major, and the pre-delay, feedback/repetition and volume of the delay in the mix all play an important part in what effect the delay has on the dry signal you're letting through - particularly in lead tones, and in vocals, delay is a valuable tool for adding excitement to a part that may be great on its own, but could be incredible with that effect added.
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Old 12-03-2012, 10:53 PM   #8
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While the idea of being able to fine tune into the idea I have with such simplicity IS exciting, I simply do not have good digital recording or editing shite. So I just try to do most things in an analog fashion. I try to think of recordings as moments in time, and I want them to sound they way the should right then, and not require things to be added or adjusted too much. So I always make sure my delay is set to the precise time, and tone is good, etc. I don't have luck with technology, everytime I try to use it to my advantage it sounds terrible, so I just stay away, haha. Thank you for acknowledging the difference in our opinions and not arguing!
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Old 12-04-2012, 03:17 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by head-case
I disagree, I would say if you cannot get the tone or sound you want, don't begin recording yet. While using digtal effects afterwards is REALLY convenient, I would never use a plug-in over the sound of a high quality delay.

The quad-core, 3.6ghz x86 processor in my computer is slightly more powerful than the little IC or Bucket Bridge chip in a delay stompbox....I really don't think quality is going to be a problem

It'd have to be a seriously nice pedal to be worth giving up the flexibility of adding delay as a post effect.
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Old 12-04-2012, 08:25 PM   #10
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eh, i think that there are both pros and cons to recording with a delay or adding it later. i mean a delay in front of an overdriven amp (or in the loop with a heavily driven power section) sounds very different than having a plugin after the amp is recorded. and sometimes there are pedals that are just hard to emulate with a plugin.

that said, i find it is typically easier to add the delay in the DAW. and it often gets better results because you can tweak it. if i were going to record an amp with the delay, i would split the signal and record something completely dry as well. that way i can always re-amp and change the delay settings (or have no delay). theres also the option of using an amp plugin and delay plugin as well.

but i can see the uses of recording a delay "live" so to speak.


and to answer the original question, turn up the level knob on your delay or mic the amp better.
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Old 12-05-2012, 03:15 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by jof1029
if i were going to record an amp with the delay, i would split the signal and record something completely dry as well. that way i can always re-amp and change the delay settings (or have no delay). theres also the option of using an amp plugin and delay plugin as well.

This, best of both worlds.

I've heard Tom Morello likes all his guitar effects completely live, with the bare minimum of processing at the mixing stage. There's definitely advantages to both approaches.
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Old 12-06-2012, 12:16 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DisarmGoliath
Or, preferably, don't use a pedal/amp delay as you will not be able to alter it in the mix later when there is inevitably a problem with the level of the delay or the tonality etc. and instead use a delay plug-in or outboard delay that you can dial in to taste when you actually need it (i.e when you're mixing the track). I would never record a delay like that unless the guitarist was incredibly stubborn and refused to unplug his $100 Boss delay pedal.

+1

It's a recipe for disaster to track a mic'd amp with delay coming through. The best way is to use a delay plug if you really need to have it on when tracking.
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