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Old 01-06-2013, 12:20 AM   #1
cubbies4life
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New to guitar and the forum

I'm pretty new to all things guitar. I started on my own a year ago using youtube videos and other free online stuff. My work has me on the road a little over half the month so I'm not really able to practice as much as I would like.

I know almost nothing about music theory and figured since I'm unable to practice when on the road (hopefully buying a traveler soon) I should start learning about music theory. Is there any E-books (I have a kindle) or regular books that I can start leaning about all that stuff you all talk about that sounds like a foreign language to me?

Also, any other advice for someone learning on their own?

Thanks for the help!
Rob
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Old 01-06-2013, 12:46 AM   #2
rockingamer2
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Check out the link in my sig about music theory; it's a good start.

Ignore modes. Why? Modal stuff is an old system of music that we have moved on hundreds of years ago. The names of them have been used more recently to describe scale shapes on the guitar but have given people the wrong idea of music theory. There is some other stuff about them, but it does you no good to get into them before understanding the basics of chords, intervals, scales, etc. So, no modes.
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Old 01-06-2013, 01:45 AM   #3
bangoodcharlote
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rockingamer2
Ignore modes.
I'm in love.

My sig has some good material. There should be a lot of good stuff in the UG archives.

You should start with the major scale.

As for books:
http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_s...mus%2Caps%2C215

The one for guitarists (eighth) looks pretty good. Chapters 3-7 are the heart of basic music theory.

Expect the reading to be difficult. This may be the densest material that you've ever read. (It's okay to spend an hour reading a page. This isn't a novel.) Read with a pencil and some paper. If you don't understand something, figure it out before you move on.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by demonofthenight
Sue, you amaze, gross, educate wonder, inspire and turn me on so much


"Melodic Control" by Marty Friedman: A video on soloing
A Great Theory Lesson

A Harmonizing Lesson
The Correct Way To Play The Gallop

~Sue
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Old 01-06-2013, 01:52 AM   #4
KG6_Steven
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First of all, welcome to guitar and to the site. My advice would be to find an instructor and at least take a few lessons. Some instructors will take you on a per lesson basis. Taking a couple of months of lessons would do you good. It really helps to have someone to answer questions, show you the ropes and steer you away from bad habits.

Second of all, Rockingamer2 is partially right about modes. You don't need to learn them right now and you may not need to learn them at all - depending on the genre of music you want to play. To say that modes are an old system of music that we've moved on from hundreds of years ago is quite incorrect. The fact is, modal scales are still used today in many forms of music. In fact, if Rockingamer2 has ever played a major scale or its relative minor, he's used the Ionian and Aeolian modal scales. To not use the modes is somewhat akin to eating food without cooking or seasoning it.

So, as he suggested... learn your chords, chord theory, intervals, notes on the neck and other things, before you jump into them. Should you find that you need to learn them, they're just another tool in your arsenal.
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Old 01-06-2013, 01:58 AM   #5
KG6_Steven
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bangoodcharlote
I'm in love.

My sig has some good material. There should be a lot of good stuff in the UG archives.

You should start with the major scale.

As for books:
http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_s...mus%2Caps%2C215

The one for guitarists (eighth) looks pretty good. Chapters 3-7 are the heart of basic music theory.

Expect the reading to be difficult. This may be the densest material that you've ever read. (It's okay to spend an hour reading a page. This isn't a novel.) Read with a pencil and some paper. If you don't understand something, figure it out before you move on.



The major scale... Ionian mode. LOL

Yes. The eight book is a winner. It's the one I have and I'm about due to buy another one to replace it. I've almost worn mine out. This book is full of stuff that will likely confuse you. If you get stuck on something, post a message on U-G and someone will answer and explain it. The book is also very good about explaining the modes and their use in modern music, even though we moved on from them hundreds of years ago. It's a very good read and quite timely for todays' guitarists.
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Old 01-06-2013, 02:05 AM   #6
bangoodcharlote
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Yes, and if you've ever multiplied real numbers (e.g. 4*7.5=30), you've worked with the binary operation providing the structure for an object in the category of abelian groups, and you've worked with commutative rings, vector spaces, and modules. Don't make things more complicated than they should be.

(What's happened to me? I just made a reference to the axiom of choice in another thread. Whatever it is, I like it.)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by demonofthenight
Sue, you amaze, gross, educate wonder, inspire and turn me on so much


"Melodic Control" by Marty Friedman: A video on soloing
A Great Theory Lesson

A Harmonizing Lesson
The Correct Way To Play The Gallop

~Sue
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Old 01-06-2013, 02:20 AM   #7
rockingamer2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KG6_Steven
First of all, welcome to guitar and to the site. My advice would be to find an instructor and at least take a few lessons. Some instructors will take you on a per lesson basis. Taking a couple of months of lessons would do you good. It really helps to have someone to answer questions, show you the ropes and steer you away from bad habits.

Second of all, Rockingamer2 is partially right about modes. You don't need to learn them right now and you may not need to learn them at all - depending on the genre of music you want to play. To say that modes are an old system of music that we've moved on from hundreds of years ago is quite incorrect. The fact is, modal scales are still used today in many forms of music. In fact, if Rockingamer2 has ever played a major scale or its relative minor, he's used the Ionian and Aeolian modal scales. To not use the modes is somewhat akin to eating food without cooking or seasoning it.

So, as he suggested... learn your chords, chord theory, intervals, notes on the neck and other things, before you jump into them. Should you find that you need to learn them, they're just another tool in your arsenal.

That's why I said "there are other things about modes." But given the horrible love affair guitarists have with modes, I think it's best to completely ignore them until they have a firm base in tonal harmony so that modes don't screw up their understanding of theory.
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^^The above is a Cryptic Metaphor^^

"To know the truth of history is to realize its ultimate myth and its inevitable ambiguity."

MUSIC THEORY LINK

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Old 01-06-2013, 02:37 AM   #8
bangoodcharlote
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So my love is not returned...awesome. :p

What's funny is that guitarists don't really have a love affair with modes; they just think they do because they borrow tones. (I suppose that it's pitch-axis theory, but even that seems like over-thinking songwriting.)

In the meanwhile, Steve, I'll continue to support teaching children arithmetic before explicitly teaching abelian categories.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by demonofthenight
Sue, you amaze, gross, educate wonder, inspire and turn me on so much


"Melodic Control" by Marty Friedman: A video on soloing
A Great Theory Lesson

A Harmonizing Lesson
The Correct Way To Play The Gallop

~Sue
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Old 01-06-2013, 02:41 AM   #9
cubbies4life
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Re getting lessons, Waiting on a return call from a local instructor. Hopefully get some lessons soon.

As for the book, I just ordered it. Can't wait to dive in to it.

I appreciate all the help and am very eager to learn. Any more advice is greatly appreciated.

Thanks again.
Rob
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Old 01-06-2013, 02:46 AM   #10
bangoodcharlote
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cubbies4life
Any more advice is greatly appreciated.
This is only half-flippant: ask questions.

I'm not kidding. End sentences with question marks. It makes you identify what it is that you want to know about (which means that you're thinking), and it gives us something specific to address.

Also, don't spam the UG (keep related questions in one thread; use the edit button rather than posting twice in a row, etc), but don't think that you're annoying when you're asking questions. We're all on here because we want to be.
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by demonofthenight
Sue, you amaze, gross, educate wonder, inspire and turn me on so much


"Melodic Control" by Marty Friedman: A video on soloing
A Great Theory Lesson

A Harmonizing Lesson
The Correct Way To Play The Gallop

~Sue

Last edited by bangoodcharlote : 01-06-2013 at 02:48 AM.
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