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Old 03-24-2008, 12:54 AM   #21
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Originally Posted by metalimaster
go for pentatonic cos it's pretty simple to learn all the shapes in it...... that way u can move up an down the fret board an ppl who have no musical knowledge will think ur the king

also........... e minor cos it is so damn metal!!!!!!!


Wrong, wrong, wrong. Entirely wrong.

TS, do NOT restrict yourself to shapes and boxes. Scales are not shapes, they are collections of notes. First, as steven seagull suggested, learn the major scale; all scales, including the pentatonic scale, will relate back to it. Make sure you understand the scale, know its construction and intervals inside out. Then learn the formula for the pentatonic scale, and learn to apply it all over the fretboard. You can learn boxes as a quick positioning reference, but think of playing in terms of notes and not box shapes.

Also, make sure you have a very solid understanding of chords before moving to lead work.
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Old 03-24-2008, 08:14 AM   #22
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Originally Posted by soadrocker856
No ****. Any part of music, such as chords and scales, are a part of music theory. Anybody can learn scales but still be oblivious to all of music theory. Try being less of a smartass.

no you can't.

You can learn scale patterns without theory, not scales. And therein lies the problem - people thing that by blindly following a tab of a single position scale position that they've "learned a scale", and they haven't. There's a lot of ignorance and misinformation in this forum with regards to theory and you're just adding to it...granted it's a small detail but it's an important one. Learning a box shape with no understanding of the notes or intervals teaches you next to nothing...somebody could teach me to read Japanese poetry purely phoenetically but that doesn't mean I can speak Japanese.

Try being less ignorant.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JRoyall
thank you for your input I think I'm going to learn the major then minor and then penatonic. One question when practicing should I practce wirt a metronome and star out slow do it untill I perfect it then bump up the speed?

Don't go down that road! Scales AREN'T about speed, they're about music - scales allow us to hear how certain notes sound together and give us a musical framework to work around. I personally see little point in rigidly practicing scale patterns, all it does is teach you to run up and down scale patterns and that makes for incredibly boring playing. Obviously you can use scale patterns as picking exercises or warmups, just bear in mind that it won't necessarily help your overall playing ability much. The best way to use scales when practicing is to practice licks and runs that you can actually use in your playing, for example sliding runs that travel along the fretboard.

The first thing to do when learning a scale is to learn how it sounds, play it on the guitar one interval at a time and really study them, listen to the way the two notes interact and listen for the same sound in music. The better you internalise a scale, let's say knowing it well enough to be able to hum it, the better you'll be able to use it.
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Old 03-24-2008, 08:36 AM   #23
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well if you already know the major/minor scales then you will know the pentatonic because the pentatonic is a 5 note version of the major/minor scale. all you have to learn is witch notes to take out

so if you want to play in pentatonic just play a major/minor and leave out the notes.
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Old 03-24-2008, 08:40 AM   #24
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Most stuff has been covered.. so I'll just say that I personally started off with the C Major scale pattern. Then I learned a bit more about music theory and how scales are made up.
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Old 03-24-2008, 01:44 PM   #25
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Mk thank you for all of your input.
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Old 03-24-2008, 03:27 PM   #26
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Hahah. Crazy thread. Just shows how much stuff there is to learn, and even how many more ways there is to learn it.

I bought a metronome, but dont use it right now. I have no need to keep time or anything, so why bother? Im not in a band or anything. Right now, I just want to learn how to play by, feel, if you will. I practice scales, but sometimes it slow. Sometimes its fast. Sometimes its choppy. Sometimes I skip notes. Im getting to the point where I can just play around with it. Way more fun than running up and down a scale for 15 minutes.

For me, I want to develop an 'ear' for what to play. That doesnt mean I dont want theory; on the contrary, I want that more. But I want to be able to play what I want, when I want without being a robot, and understand WHY Im playing it.

I dont even really mess with song tabs at the moment...
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Old 04-26-2013, 08:49 PM   #27
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depends what type of music you want to play - if you like playing the blues - learn the pentatonic scale 1st - i find it also the easiest
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Old 04-26-2013, 09:06 PM   #28
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Originally Posted by Greg71
depends what type of music you want to play - if you like playing the blues - learn the pentatonic scale 1st - i find it also the easiest

Please don't bump very old threads for no reason.
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Old 04-26-2013, 09:43 PM   #29
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99.999999999999 percent of western music is built around the major scale and its variations.Its the mother earth of them all so to speak.Steven Seagulls advice was the best here.Take the major scale and learn it like the back of you hand, not only patterns but its intervals,its sound, learn the circle of fifths,harmonize it etc etc etc.

Do that and you ll find out that you ll need to just move a few things around to create all the other scales you are interested in.That way ll learn everything from the ground up including theory and not bits and pieces from everywhere trying to string them together later.Dont be another one who molests 2.5 patterns of the minor pentatonic for about 10 minutes and thats it.Be serious and learn everything from the beginning..so...major scale mate,no way around it .
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Old 04-26-2013, 10:27 PM   #30
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Major scales - all 12, up and down the whole neck. Start on the lowest note in the scale that's on your instrument, and go up to the highest. That means you're learning a set of notes, not just a pattern, and that gives you a lot more flexibility when you play.

It can be really helpful to write out the scales before you play them. Look up the basic Major Scale pattern and, starting with C, work out all the intervals. It's like basic arithmetic. DO NOT just look up the scales! Figure them out based on the pattern. It shouldn't take very long, and it'll really get them in your memory.
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