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Old 05-17-2011, 12:45 PM   #101
HedlessChickn
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I rarely read a thread from beginning to end, but I did this one. Thank you so much for this.
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Old 07-09-2011, 10:22 PM   #102
axeman80
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Hey fellow Axeman...thanks for the work on this thread. I've read it a few times as my cover band is getting more gigs now.

We have some festival dates coming up, and one asked if we had our ASCAP license. Is it common for festivals to put the license honus on the bands? Also, any idea on how much a license to allow us to play covers would run? (guessing it will have to do with number and size of performances maybe)

Thank you sir
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Old 07-14-2011, 12:17 AM   #103
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That's *weird.*

I mean, really... it's a festival. They can get *one* license, or they can book, what, twenty bands and have them *each* get a license? That's stupid.

What festival is this? Is it an established entity?

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Old 07-18-2011, 10:27 PM   #104
axeman80
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I though it was strange also. It's a smallish city in Illinois, and this is the second year they've had a fall festival with bands playing.

I'll certainly keep up with them. Should a cover type band ever consider getting a license?
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Old 07-21-2011, 11:35 AM   #105
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Generally, no. As I say, most venues that most cover bands play at are already obliged to purchase this licence. No point in purchasing something yourself if your employer has already paid for it.

CT
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Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
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Old 10-23-2011, 09:39 PM   #106
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How does copyrighting with a alias work?

It mainly concerns me to use a alias because if I actually do go out and make a record deal, and it doesn't work out I don't want to end up trying to find a job and my degree being worthless because in my background check my attempt at a music career popped up.

Mainly because a lot of stuff I have written to myself so far is very dark and not really mainstream friendly.

Anyways, if I where to copyright it under a alias would someone else be able to assume that alias and steal it, or would I still have to give info that can be linked back to me out or what?

Last edited by zomgguitarz1234 : 10-23-2011 at 09:43 PM.
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Old 10-23-2011, 10:31 PM   #107
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To do it under an alias, you would essentially be gifting it to someone who does not exist, and you would later possibly be forced to prove that you are that person who does not exist. How would you do that?

However.....

A business can own assets, and a copyright is an asset.

So, you could register it as © Zom Music, 2011

You'd just need to register your business name under your own name.


CT
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Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

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Quote:
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Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
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Old 10-23-2011, 10:39 PM   #108
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Quote:
Originally Posted by axemanchris
To do it under an alias, you would essentially be gifting it to someone who does not exist, and you would later possibly be forced to prove that you are that person who does not exist. How would you do that?

However.....

A business can own assets, and a copyright is an asset.

So, you could register it as © Zom Music, 2011

You'd just need to register your business name under your own name.


CT


So I could register it under my band name. Where would I register it as a business?
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Old 10-24-2011, 05:59 PM   #109
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Typically, business licences are issued by the city/municipality.

CT
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Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Quote:
Originally Posted by firehawk
Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
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Old 11-06-2011, 01:58 PM   #110
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Can I record a cover of a classical song like Fur Elise by Beethoven, use it on my album and sell it on itunes and such without the trouble of copyright?


Thanks,
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Old 11-13-2011, 12:20 AM   #111
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You'd have to take it on a title-by-title basis. It comes down to what country you are in, and who the composer is. In order for a composition to be in the public domain, it will be between 50-80 years after the composer's death, depending on where you are.

Some "classical" composers haven't been dead that long, though. Stravinski's work, for instance, will not be public domain for a while yet in most countries.

Be careful, too, in that an arrangement is also copyrightable. If you took Fur Elise from, say, a Mel Bay method book and recorded it, you'd not likely be violating the copyright of the composition, but would likely be violating the copyright of the arrangement. Best bet: go to the original composition and create your own arrangement.

Once all that is taken care of, then I believe, yes, you could sell it wherever you wanted.

CT
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Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Quote:
Originally Posted by firehawk
Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
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Old 11-13-2011, 04:26 AM   #112
MaddMann274
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Quote:
Originally Posted by axemanchris
You'd have to take it on a title-by-title basis. It comes down to what country you are in, and who the composer is. In order for a composition to be in the public domain, it will be between 50-80 years after the composer's death, depending on where you are.

Some "classical" composers haven't been dead that long, though. Stravinski's work, for instance, will not be public domain for a while yet in most countries.

Be careful, too, in that an arrangement is also copyrightable. If you took Fur Elise from, say, a Mel Bay method book and recorded it, you'd not likely be violating the copyright of the composition, but would likely be violating the copyright of the arrangement. Best bet: go to the original composition and create your own arrangement.

Once all that is taken care of, then I believe, yes, you could sell it wherever you wanted.

CT


Got it. Thanks.
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Old 12-01-2011, 01:19 PM   #113
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I got another question:

If you copyright a song and then make some changes to it (such as demo'ing it on youtube, then recording a full version that has a few more changes like different notes or just longer or something) does the copyright cover those changes?
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Old 12-01-2011, 05:18 PM   #114
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As long as the changes do not drastically affect the song to the extent the two versions would never be confused, the copyright will cover all versions of that song. Consider that if your favourite band records a cover, they still have to credit the original artists.
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Old 02-19-2013, 06:47 AM   #115
Forkman
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What's the go with naming your band after a fictional character from a movie/book etc? Just curious because I've heard of bands such as Lucas Brassi (a character from the Godfather) and I've wondered whether they're infringing on copyright?
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Old 04-15-2013, 12:16 PM   #116
YamiFrankc
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Hello, i think i have some questions.

Im mexican but currently live in USA. I was reading about registering works in mexico and found it cost only about $15 dollars to register a work under your name. They also have a clause if your work is based on someone's else work.
Works registered in Mexico are protected in all countries that signed the 'Berne convention, 'Roma Convention' and the OMPI.
Would it be the 'same' to register my works in mexico than if i register them in the USA?

I also have questions about the arrangements things and public domain.

Lets say I write a song, and in the solo or any other part of it I play parts of a classical song such as something written by Paganini? -- I believe his music is public domain just because he lived very long ago. Can I just get away with it without problems?

Now, same question, but a newer song, lets say something made by Black Sabbath, and I start a solo in my song and it begins with the same notes Iommi did a solo, but then my solo gets completely different. Am I breaking copyrights?

As for arrangements i think i understood that i can make my own arrangements(cant use others) of public domain music(very old classical music?), right?
But lets say I make a arrangement of contemporary music(more specific , japanese, videogames and mexican music), can i go away with it and have no problem registering and playing MY arrangements?

And another one for band names, similar to Forkman's.
Lets say I have a musical project with a name based from an anime character. The name of my project is only the character's last name, and that word is also a kind of tank in japanese. The name is clearly a reference to her, would I have any problems with it?
That anime is quite popular all over the world and im pretty sure it is licensed in other countries other than japan.

Thats all i think. Thank!
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Old 04-22-2013, 02:27 PM   #117
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Very helpful. Thanks for posting this.
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Old 04-24-2013, 05:07 PM   #118
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Quote:
Originally Posted by axemanchris
4 - copyright and your own material (myths, half-truths, and truths)



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What about an email sent with an attached file like a guitar pro file?
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Old 06-05-2014, 02:07 PM   #119
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Hola Yami,

Quote:
Originally Posted by YamiFrankc
Would it be the 'same' to register my works in mexico than if i register them in the USA?


Probably, but it would be a good idea to find out from an official source.

Quote:
Lets say I write a song, and in the solo or any other part of it I play parts of a classical song such as something written by Paganini? -- I believe his music is public domain just because he lived very long ago. Can I just get away with it without problems?


As Chris said above-thread, not all "old" music is in the public domain. You need to find out whether each specific piece that you want to use, is.

Quote:
Now, same question, but a newer song, lets say something made by Black Sabbath, and I start a solo in my song and it begins with the same notes Iommi did a solo, but then my solo gets completely different. Am I breaking copyrights?


I don't know the exact law or the exact number of notes, but I believe that in order for a melody to be considered in violation of copyright, a certain number of notes must be the same as the melody they're copying. So if your melody is in eighths and the first two notes are A B, and some other guy starts his eighth-note melody with A B, it's not a copyright violation, but if your melodies share the first, say, seven notes, then it's a violation. Again, you'll need to do some research on this, but I'd probably just make my own distinct melodies rather than worry about what I can "get away" with.

Quote:
As for arrangements i think i understood that i can make my own arrangements(cant use others) of public domain music(very old classical music?), right?
But lets say I make a arrangement of contemporary music(more specific , japanese, videogames and mexican music), can i go away with it and have no problem registering and playing MY arrangements?


Arrangements are almost always strictly backing chords/rhythms. If your piece has the same melody as another piece, you're in violation. It doesn't matter if they played the melody on a guitar with a full band backup and you played it on a kazoo in cut-time with a washboard rhythm section. The melody's the thing. I'd argue that if your piece was in any way recognizable as the piece you're aping then you're in violation.

Quote:
And another one for band names, similar to Forkman's.
Lets say I have a musical project with a name based from an anime character. The name of my project is only the character's last name, and that word is also a kind of tank in japanese. The name is clearly a reference to her, would I have any problems with it?
That anime is quite popular all over the world and im pretty sure it is licensed in other countries other than japan.


It depends. You probably won't fall afoul of the anime, given that the word exists in the Japanese language anyway, and even if it's a reference since you're not passing yourself off as that character or that intellectual property it should be okay. That said, Sean "Puffy Diddly Daddy Whateverthe****hecallshimselfnow" Coombs did successfully stop the J-Pop band Puffy from going by that name in the US, which is why they're known as Puffy AmiYumi here... despite the fact that he hasn't gone by Puffy in years.

So, your concern is probably more about whether or not other artists are performing under that name in your target market. That said, Green Jello (the band) had to change their name to Green Jelly because the Jell-O people sued. So, it's not a given.
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