Go Back   UG Community @ Ultimate-Guitar.Com > Music > Recordings
User Name  
Password
Search:

Reply
Old 08-13-2013, 03:32 PM   #1
bass-fale47
Registered User
 
bass-fale47's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: scotland
old vs new way to record

First off I know very little about recording instruments so sorry if this seems like a stupid question.

Why don't bands still record a song all together? I heard they used to record the drums, bass and rhythm guitar together and the record the vocals and lead guitar separately. Whereas now every instrument is recorded separately. (some still do this but not many, I think this was how the new Black Sabbath album was done)

The old method sounds quicker and if it takes less time then it should be cheaper to record an album. But they will need to be well rehearsed before they can record all together like that.

Hopefully that makes sense.
bass-fale47 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-2013, 04:25 PM   #2
oneblackened
Future Breed Machine
 
oneblackened's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Asgaard
It's actually MUCH harder to get a good take like that. That's mostly the reason it's not done that way any more.
__________________
-Dave
LTD MH-400 (SD Distortion/59)
LTD EC-1000 (BKP Black Hawks)
LTD AW-7 (Dimarzio D-Activator 7s, Hipshot Bridge)
oneblackened is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-2013, 04:34 PM   #3
flexiblemile
Registered User
 
flexiblemile's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
^^
good short answer


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multitrack_recording

^^
long answer

EDIT: Except to the guy above, I'd add that it's not done THAT MUCH anymore. A lot of bands still use it.... If recording time isn't an issue, the producer is good and a band is super tight, I would actually prefer the "live" way

Last edited by flexiblemile : 08-13-2013 at 04:35 PM.
flexiblemile is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-2013, 04:57 PM   #4
crazysam23_Atax
Burning away
 
crazysam23_Atax's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: The Frozen North! (read: Northern Wisconsin)
Some bands still do the "live way". However, it's much easier to have your drummer record his part, then the bass, then guitar, etc. I sometimes practice recording 2 instruments at once, which is good for my learning.
__________________
Tunes?

Bandcamp

Now working on my upcoming EP "Discarnate". See the expected track list on my bandcamp.



Terry Prachett is funnier than you! Discworld
crazysam23_Atax is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-14-2013, 04:27 AM   #5
tim_mop
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
A major reason is spill. Even with screens, the guitar amps will be picked up by the drum mics, and the singer would either have to use a 58 and get a compromised sound, or a condenser with a ton of other spill. It limits your control over the instruments.
tim_mop is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-14-2013, 08:57 AM   #6
kyle62
Need a dispenser here!
 
kyle62's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: NW England
A lot of people are still doing it that way, it depends entirely on the vibe of the music you want to do.

I record rock bands in the same room, with only light separation (half-height gobos etc) because I think the bleed adds to the mojo. However, when you're talking about tighter, more technically complex music (metal etc), you want things to be as clean as possible or the little bits of noise and bleed will rapidly add up, giving you a muddy mix.

A good blend of the two techniques is best, capturing the whole band at once for the base track (the same way you do with guide vocals) but then overdubbing wherever it's needed.

Another reason is that many bands are too shit to pull off a decent live take, people are getting lazy and expect to 'fix it in the mix'.
__________________
"I don't care about the things I leave at home, cause things can't really keep you company when you're alone"
Mark Sandman


Head honcho at Stubborn Sound!
https://soundcloud.com/stubbornsound
kyle62 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-14-2013, 09:22 AM   #7
Tempoe
. . . ∆ . . .
 
Tempoe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: On an Island
A good tight band in a proper studio can pul it off perfectly and easily. IMO it adds a lot of feel and makes he recording much better in some ways. Old Beatles have that feel, but Sgt Peppers (most of it was live recording) but the production/overdubs started then because the band said they'd never have to play it live...pretty much a 1st.
Tempoe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-14-2013, 01:28 PM   #8
diabolical
Registered User
 
diabolical's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Houston, TX
One of the last CDs I recorded while working in a studio a few years ago was of a metal band (Pantera clone) playing in the room together. Drums were miked in the room, all the other instruments were in iso booths, vocalist was in an iso booth recording scratch vocals and rhythm guitar.

We had to overdub the rhythm guitars and leads but the drums were pretty much keepers from the original recordings.

I think it is mainly the copy/paste and drum grid alignment in modern metal that is making productions inorganic. Listen to anything by Sneap for example. Can you tell the difference of production in the bands? It's the same sounds with a different vocal.
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by CodeMonk
Trading an MG + $100 for a Spider is like trading dogshit for catshit and paying for the privilege.
diabolical is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-2013, 11:31 PM   #9
crazysam23_Atax
Burning away
 
crazysam23_Atax's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: The Frozen North! (read: Northern Wisconsin)
Quote:
Originally Posted by kyle62
A lot of people are still doing it that way, it depends entirely on the vibe of the music you want to do.

I record rock bands in the same room, with only light separation (half-height gobos etc) because I think the bleed adds to the mojo. However, when you're talking about tighter, more technically complex music (metal etc), you want things to be as clean as possible or the little bits of noise and bleed will rapidly add up, giving you a muddy mix.

A lot of it with Metal is that there's a ton of distortion in the mix. You really can't afford any bleed to further distort things.
__________________
Tunes?

Bandcamp

Now working on my upcoming EP "Discarnate". See the expected track list on my bandcamp.



Terry Prachett is funnier than you! Discworld
crazysam23_Atax is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2013, 06:52 AM   #10
diabolical
Registered User
 
diabolical's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Houston, TX
A lot of the 80s metal band actually recorded as a performance, even all the way to Metallica's "AJFA" album. They had to cut just the tape off of Lars' feet where he does the double kicks on "One" and replace it with time matched pieces from other takes. Fleming Rassmussen spilled it all
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by CodeMonk
Trading an MG + $100 for a Spider is like trading dogshit for catshit and paying for the privilege.
diabolical is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2013, 11:59 AM   #11
fastlanestoner
the nxt NEXT Nigel Tufnel
 
fastlanestoner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: it's a dark night on the west coast...
Pot

Many bands do perform live in the studio, or at least to get the rhythm tracks down.
__________________
Audio Ecstasy Productions!

Guitar/Backline Tech in the Los Angeles area and on tour!
Custom guitar pedals and cabling for stage and studio!

I set up DAWs and tweak computers to record audio. Hit me up @ audioecstasyproductions[at}gmail.com
fastlanestoner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2013, 07:13 PM   #12
ironmanben
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2009
When my band recorded we did it the "old way". Since we're a power-trio it was actually much more efficient to do it that way, especially we'd been playing the songs live for a while and were decently tight on them. The engineer ran the bass directly into the computer, and my guitar amp was in a separate, closed off room, with the door only cracked open for my cable, and we listened to ourselves through the headphones. We got a lot of separation that way, while staying in the same room and playing together. I only overdubbed 2 guitar solos, the vocals, and a second rhythm guitar for one song. Really happy with the way that session went.
ironmanben is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2013, 11:03 PM   #13
axemanchris
Awwww.... NOW what?!
 
axemanchris's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
I'd venture to suggest that most rock bands record in the traditional fashion, and then overdub what is necessary. This method may or may not involve iso booths, etc. The reason is that, a recording made this way usually comes across as more organic and more live. Perfect for a Franz Ferdinand, White Stripes, etc. kind of band.

If the band's sound is more or less "defined" as being really precise and surgical - like say, Def Leppard - a more precise, surgical approach would generally be what would be required.

People make a big deal over bleed. It can be, but it isn't always.

CT
__________________
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Quote:
Originally Posted by firehawk
Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
axemanchris is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 04:33 AM.

Forum Archives / About / Terms of Use / Advertise / Contact / Ultimate-Guitar.Com © 2014
Powered by: vBulletin Version 3.0.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.