Go Back   UG Community @ Ultimate-Guitar.Com > Instruments > Bass Guitar
User Name  
Password
Search:

Reply
Old 02-01-2013, 09:01 PM   #1
Putricide
Registered User
 
Putricide's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Does a pedal make a bass "active"?

Obviously im new to this... I am wondering about using this pedal because i had a bad expirience the first time i tried to use it on my bass and im still trying to figure out what the problem was. But i was wondering if the use of a standard guitar fuzz pedal (Behringer SF300, to be exact) Would classify an instrument as an active instrument or not, help? btw i use a Ampeg BA-115 with a Squier Affinity 5-String (Complete with the black flag logo in duct tape on the pick guard.)
Putricide is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-2013, 10:00 PM   #2
Dayn
Registered User
 
Dayn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Brisbane, Australia
'Active' or 'passive' refers to the pickups. Pickups produce a signal when the strings vibrate in their magnetic field. Passive pickups are simply that. Active pickups additionally have a preamp on board, powered by a battery. This adjusts the signal in many number of ways before leaving the guitar.

That's it. Adding a pedal does not make anything 'active'. It alters the sound afterwards, yes, but 'active' refers to the pickups having a preamp which adjust the signal before leaving the guitar.

There's no need to fret about classifying your instrument. 'Active' or 'passive' just refers the pickups. What matters is the sound you get.
__________________
Ibanez RG2228 w/ EMG808Xs | Line 6 POD HD500 | Mackie HD1221
Dayn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-2013, 10:04 PM   #3
Putricide
Registered User
 
Putricide's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
The only reason i was worrying about it was i have no idea what plugging a Active instrument into the 0dB would do. Also the way i learned wether or not something was active was if it involved a power source, wether that be batteries or a plug in the wall. Thanks though
Putricide is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-2013, 10:29 PM   #4
rageahol
Registered User
 
rageahol's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
it'll be grand just a little loud or whatnot
rageahol is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2013, 12:31 AM   #5
chatterbox272
Registered User
 
chatterbox272's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Perth, Western Australia
Quote:
Originally Posted by Putricide
The only reason i was worrying about it was i have no idea what plugging a Active instrument into the 0dB would do. Also the way i learned wether or not something was active was if it involved a power source, wether that be batteries or a plug in the wall. Thanks though

It doesn't matter. The difference between the active and passive inputs in an amp is simply that they make the active one quieter because it's likely receiving a stronger signal.
I always used to plug my passive bass into the active input of my old practice amp because it allowed me to get lower volumes (my family doesn't like noise too much). Now I plug my active bass into the passive input of my new amp because I want the extra volume (as long as nothings making bad distortion noises).
__________________
Masquerade: #19


Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael J. Caboose
Time isn't made out of lines, it is made out of circles. That is why clocks are round.
chatterbox272 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2013, 08:42 AM   #6
Ziphoblat
Hazardous
 
Ziphoblat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: England
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dayn
'Active' or 'passive' refers to the pickups. Pickups produce a signal when the strings vibrate in their magnetic field. Passive pickups are simply that. Active pickups additionally have a preamp on board, powered by a battery. This adjusts the signal in many number of ways before leaving the guitar.


Not solely. Active pick-ups have their signal boosted to compensate for their inherently quieter signal. You can still have an active bass with passive pick-ups though, if it has a pre-amp installed (usually for extra EQ control).

In some sense, I suppose a signal could be treated as you would had it come from an active instrument after being run through certain pedals, depending on the nature of the pedal. Certain pedals function as pre-amps in themselves, for example the Sadowsky outboard pre-amp which is actually just the same circuitry as you would find in their active instruments but installed in a pedal format than in the instrument itself. Signals from these pre-amps tend to be hotter, so active inputs on amps exist with a dB attenuator to bring the signal back down to a manageable level in order to avoid unwanted clipping of the pre-amp. That's all they're doing, there's no magical difference between an "active" signal and a "passive" signal.

It would be a lot easier to guess why you had problems if you could extrapolate on what this 'bad experience' actually was. If it just sounded bad, I'm not entirely sure that you were doing anything wrong, because I'd expect a bass running into a Behringer fuzz pedal intended for guitar to sound pretty terrible.
__________________
Save a Cow,
Eat a Vegan.
Ziphoblat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2013, 10:43 AM   #7
Spanner93
Comrade Spanner
 
Spanner93's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Nieuwegein, The Netherlands
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ziphoblat
I'd expect a bass running into a Behringer fuzz pedal intended for guitar to sound pretty terrible.


I had a VD1 Behringer distortion that I used with a bass, it was surprisingly passable. Tbh I think fuzzes are all much of a muchness so it probably doesn't make that much difference.
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by Karl Marx
Reason has always existed, but not always in a reasonable form.
Spanner93 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2013, 02:26 PM   #8
Putricide
Registered User
 
Putricide's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Yeah i tired it, it took a little messing around with the settings but i got it to sound fine. However it loses the low end (As most pedals intended for guitar do) so im working on saving up for a MXR Fuzz Pedal that was designed for Bass. It gives the exact sound i have been looking for. As for now though, this Behringer pedal will have to do.
Putricide is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 11:40 AM.

Forum Archives / About / Terms of Use / Advertise / Contact / Ultimate-Guitar.Com © 2014
Powered by: vBulletin Version 3.0.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.