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Old 05-14-2013, 03:15 PM   #21
metalmetalhead
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BloodReverence I dunno about you but I'm the opposite. I've blown my voice out more from talking than yelling, when i yell i end up using the same technique i use for screaming, diaphragm support, and it doesn't strain.
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I don't know either. Iv been speaking since I was 3, I couldn't imagine doing it incorrectly. Much less blowing out my voice by talking. Maybe If you alter your speaking voice But that wouldn't be your natural speaking voice. and it would not be resonating correctly.

besides If your a screamer and you practice for a hour and hurt your voice knowing it or not knowing it..talking afterwards the rest of the day isn't going to make it any better...You follow? smoking while talking or singing is bad too. speaking out of your range wouldn't be good either.

everyones different. using my speaking voice greatly helped me stay relaxed. It also will help you get an idea of how your natural voice should sound like. at least whatever is left of it. Not directed to anyone. But if you damage your voice it will change the sound and tone of your voice.

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BSaxby for me too, speaking voice and singing are two different things


But Are they really 2 different things?
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Old 05-14-2013, 04:34 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by metalmetalhead
But Are they really 2 different things?


Yes. Not in the sense that the sound is produced somewhere else, it's still your cords. But a few things change like pronunciation, tone, vocal placement, vowels etc. We don't generally sing the same way we talk.
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Old 05-15-2013, 02:18 AM   #23
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singing is like a chipmunk. people dont talk like chipmunks
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Old 05-15-2013, 10:29 AM   #24
Blind In 1 Ear
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Originally Posted by jacobmusicboy
Im a 19 year old singer im a baritone. my voice sounds somewhat like jeremy camp . f2 is the end of my low end and f4 the high end. i can hit an a4 using my head voice but it sounds trebly and really ugly . i really want to sing like myles kennedy and chris daughtry . i believe its all about the technique . and im sure the right technique doesnt involve strain .


what is that right technique? I read that myles kennedy uses bel canto technique and anotherthing i speak in a low tone does that affect my range? are high pitched notes supposed to sound loud while singing? i have dark deep voice and i love singing with a scratch in my voice i play guitar i write songs AND HIGH PITCHED parts of the song are the peaks

i really want to nail those notes . people like scott stapp and the skillet singer and james hetfield are baritones i believe but they also hit high notes in their songs how do they do it ? thats a lotta questions . i know .coz im serious about music and about improving . anyone with right knowledge kindly help me out

learn a technique called vocal fry. use it as an exercise to learn how to shed weight from the voice, sing with more ease, place your voice better, and increase your range. i'm a baritone as well who can go down to about a Db2 with a full tone. but with this technique i can get up to an A4 pretty comfortable now. i can get up to a B4 as well but not as comfortable and full as the A4 yet. and when i was practicing more when i wasn't working as much, i was getting up to tenor C and up. granted they sounded more "rock-like" as vocal fry will distort your voice. think axl rose for a more exaggerated version of vocal fry. you don't need to sound that way though. the key is to work on it and try to find the sweet spot where you are the edge of fry and true voice and to shed weight from your lower notes.

i find one thing that helps too is to not fill out your lower notes too much. try to keep your voice tonally consistent throughout your range. most tenors have thinner sounding voices so don't be afraid to sound a little "sissy" at first. you'll get used to it and the notes will sound better with time. also, when hitting higher notes, think less air not more. most people hear a high note coming, they take a big breath and belt it out. that can work sometimes, but doing with ease and control would be better right? vocal fry will teach you to use less air anyway. it's also a lot to do with mentality. if you hesitate the note will usually not sound that great. singing is about confidence and building that requires practice so sing often.

hope that helps a bit. but don't be down on a low voice. focus on emoting a song, bringing out something unique in your voice, make the best of the range you have, and remember most tenors wish they could sing rich, full, low notes like baritones and basses. also, girls dig manly voices :P
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Old 05-15-2013, 05:40 PM   #25
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Originally Posted by Sethis
Yes. Not in the sense that the sound is produced somewhere else, it's still your cords. But a few things change like pronunciation, tone, vocal placement, vowels etc. We don't generally sing the same way we talk.


Maybe If you try singing higher or out of your range. Then you see all your vocal flaws. And you have vocal strain. but in the same notes, your speaking voice may lack support and seem weak but is it relaxed? Thats what your looking for.
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Old 05-16-2013, 10:03 AM   #26
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Originally Posted by metalmetalhead
Maybe If you try singing higher or out of your range. Then you see all your vocal flaws. And you have vocal strain. but in the same notes, your speaking voice may lack support and seem weak but is it relaxed? Thats what your looking for.


But for a baritone to sing in his speaking range is not largely useful. The notes are much lower than 90% of music that is popular or being played.

Also, your voice is perfect as a baby but as you grow older it becomes flawed, which is why many people need to LEARN how to sing. The speaking voice is often the most flawed for most people and, if I were to try and sing in my higher range with the same voice as my speaking, it'd crack up and I'd be back to square one.

There needs to be diaphragm support and a small about of tension squeezing the chords together as you go up in your range, which won't happen with your speaking voice.

NOTE: Tension =/= strain

Tension is the small amount of squeeze that's necessary to keep your vocal chords zipped together, where strain is your body's reaction to improper singing. Strain will make your cheeks, jaw and throat start to lock up.


Also, not sure if you were making a jab at screaming or not, but screaming properly does not hurt your chords. Often times I sing my best after warming up with screaming as it exercises the diaphragm and helps you regulate air-flow while keeping your throat relaxed.

Also, often times the sound of a person's singing voice will be different due to the added resonance that one creates while singing. My speaking voice is more low and vocal-fry'ish where as my singing voice is much more open, rounded and higher in tone. Why? Because my singing resonates in a different place than my singing.
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Old 05-18-2013, 09:59 AM   #27
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Originally Posted by BloodReverence
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I'm not saying you can learn to sing by just speaking. I'm saying Someones natural speaking voice resonates more freely in the sinus and head cavities. And thats where you see your true voice. Your still thinking your voice is separated into parts vocal fry, chest voice, head voice, middle voice, and false voice. I wont say this is wrong but its not how I look at it.

How about just 1 Call it Your Modal range. False voice and vocal fry not included.

Learning to sing is a long process. Theres alot involved and it takes along time. Even speakers need vocal lessons. I'm not saying you can just learn to sing by talking. Heres what I'm getting at. pay attention to your friends chatter and laugh and joke..Alot of times you will here people talking and laughing these really high notes. in there natural voice. And they don't sing.

Air support comes natural If your jaw or neck and face is relaxed. And air is allowed to move freely. Did you know There are 4 different types of abdominal breathing? I Hardly pay any attention to my diaphragm anymore. Its mostly inhale.

Now you gotta realize we are only trained to do short breaths while speaking. so your speaking voice will lack support. But its a good place to start if you want to find your true natural voice.

Your range is determined by your speaking voice. Its not so much the notes you hit as it is the sound of your voice hitting the notes. Notice how theres so much depth in an opera singers voice? resonating the voice and allowing it to be free will greatly help you in your higher notes.

What helps me Is ill play a song I made up speak it very short phrases, not holding no long notes. But also relaxed tongue and not pronouncing the words quite well. I try to imagine breathing in and up into my head and nose area.

I'm not making no jabs, I scream some but Nothing serious. I'm more into Gnr, disturbed, alice in chains. and stuff. But I don't have a heavy metal voice.
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Old 06-01-2013, 04:05 AM   #28
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Look up Robert lunte, James lugo, Jaime vendera or Ken tamplin. Those guys have exercises for expanding the range. It's perfectly doable for a baritone to sing high tenor notes.
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