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Old 06-23-2013, 02:24 AM   #1
sashki
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Is there a name for this?

Let's say I have a chord progression that goes

C - E - Am - F

In the key of C, you would expect the E chord to be E minor, but here it's E major. Is there a name for this sort of thing?
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Old 06-23-2013, 02:36 AM   #2
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It called borrowing a chord, usually from the parallel scale. Although, it sounds like that progression is a III - V - i - IV (with the IV chord borrowed from the parallel major).

Chord borrowing is also known as mode mixture, but the word "mode" in this sense just means "major" or "minor."
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Old 06-23-2013, 02:38 AM   #3
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It's more likely to be in the key of Am. Hope that is enough info to figure the rest out.
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Old 06-23-2013, 04:24 AM   #4
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You could call the E a V/vi (five of six) meaning you're tonicizing the vi chord. Which basically means you're acting like the vi is the key you're in for a moment.

So it'd be:

I V/vi vi IV

You could also say the whole thing is Am. Depends on what you hear it as I guess.
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When you crank up the gain to 10 and switch to the lead channel, it actually sounds like you are unjustifiably bombing an innocent foreign land.


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Old 06-23-2013, 04:25 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rockingamer2
It called borrowing a chord, usually from the parallel scale. Although, it sounds like that progression is a III - V - i - IV (with the IV chord borrowed from the parallel major).

Chord borrowing is also known as mode mixture, but the word "mode" in this sense just means "major" or "minor."


If you're calling the Am the i chord, the F would be a VI, not a IV, and it wouldn't be borrowed. The VI of Am is F.
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Quote:
Originally posted by primusfan
When you crank up the gain to 10 and switch to the lead channel, it actually sounds like you are unjustifiably bombing an innocent foreign land.


╠═══════╬═══════╣
τλε τρπ βπστλεπλσσδ
╠═══════╬═══════╣
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Old 06-23-2013, 06:30 AM   #6
Cmd. Cool
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I would say this is in Am.
A harmonic minor, which can be used interchangeably with the natural minor, would mean that the V chords would be an Emajor, not Eminor. This is an idea heard often in classical music, and Spanish music. For example:

Am G F E

is known as the Andalusian cadence.
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Old 06-23-2013, 09:46 AM   #7
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In C major it would be I-V/vi-vi-IV. And it's called a secondary dominant.

You can borrow chords from other keys. Actually you can use whatever chords in C major if it just resolves to C major. In classical music secondary dominants are very usual. In pop music you usually see borrowed chords like bVII, bVI, bIII, iv and v in a major key. Though secondary dominants in pop aren't that rare either.
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Old 06-23-2013, 10:07 AM   #8
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It's in C with a secondary dominant leading to the vi. Very standard thing, you see it a lot in older tunes like "All of Me" and "Sunny Side of the Street". Actually those are the exact same first four chords as "sunny Side".
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Old 06-24-2013, 12:33 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ibanezguitars44
If you're calling the Am the i chord, the F would be a VI, not a IV, and it wouldn't be borrowed. The VI of Am is F.

Shit, brain fart. Thanks for the catch.
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Old 06-24-2013, 12:52 PM   #10
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It could be one of two things.

1) The thing it actually is.

2) The thing it totally isn't, but I would say anyway because it makes me sound smart.

In this case, I think it's the thing it actually is.
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