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Old 07-04-2013, 01:54 AM   #1
j3st3r187
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Major 9 chords

How do you play these without omitting any interval? The only way i've found so far aside from playing an open chord requires thumbing the e and a, which , although it works can get pretty uncomfortable (My hands are ridiculously small it sucks )
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Old 07-04-2013, 02:11 AM   #2
GoldenGuitar
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You don't.
1 3 7 9 - the most basic way of playing.
Or you can play a major 7th and sub the 1 with a 9.
If playing with a pianist who is comping, 3 7 9 would be fine.
The possibilities are numerous.
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Old 07-04-2013, 03:24 AM   #3
supersac
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omit the 5th unless its an open chord (in standeard) Emajor 9 comes to mind
or using open strings(Dmajor 7 with an open high e string)
if you have a bassist playing th eroot you can replace the 1 with the 9

but otherwise th eonly way i could thing involved doing some thumbing if you want a moveable position
edit you really only need to thumb the E string which would be easier to do

e7 pinkie
Bx
G6 bar with index
D6 bar with index
A7 middle
E5 thumb
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Old 07-04-2013, 03:57 AM   #4
JimDawson
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Noob question- does a major 9 chord really indicate a 7th, or is it more of an implied sort of thing?

I thought that would be notated like D7add9, not D9. (if we were talking about D chords)

EDIT: Nevermind, Wikipedia has a pretty good explanation of this.
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Old 07-04-2013, 05:20 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JimDawson
Noob question- does a major 9 chord really indicate a 7th, or is it more of an implied sort of thing?

I thought that would be notated like D7add9, not D9. (if we were talking about D chords)

D9 means D7add9 (1, 3, 5, b7, 9). If you only want to have the 9th and no 7th, it's Dadd9. Oh, and D major 9 means Dmaj9, ie Dmaj7add9 (1, 3, 5, 7, 9), not D9 that is a dominant chord.
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Old 07-04-2013, 07:53 AM   #6
mdc
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JimDawson
Noob question- does a major 9 chord really indicate a 7th, or is it more of an implied sort of thing?

I thought that would be notated like D7add9, not D9. (if we were talking about D chords)

EDIT: Nevermind, Wikipedia has a pretty good explanation of this.

"add" chords are triads with an extra tone. Which doesn't make it a triad any more but it's easier to remember it as a a triad with an extra tone, so you don't confuse yourself with triads and 7th chords.
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Old 07-04-2013, 11:04 AM   #7
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9th in any context means at least 3rd, 7th, and 9th. Whenever you see an extended chord, ALWAYS include the 3rd and 7th. You can almost always omit the 5th and the root.

If you see something like D13, you can usually play just F# C and B (3, 7, and 13), but if you can, include the 9th, too. I wouldn't play the 11th unless it's specified, since it's a quirky tension on dominants.

How you voice really depends on context. If you're playing solo, you can frequently use a split voicing like G13 = 3x3455. This lets you use root position chords while keeping the voice leading interesting. If you're playing in an ensemble, use tight voicings and omit the root/5th whenever you can. You can almost always sub out your root for a 9th, and your 5th for a 13th, which is a simple way of getting all your upper chord tones in a 3 or 4 note chord.

Looking at a basic closed-voice G7 again: xx3433 - you can raise the root up t A for a G9 xx3435, and the 5th up to E for a 13th, xx3455. That should look familiar, as it's the same G13 voicing as above, but with the root taken out of the lower register.

Now, if you really want to fully voice your maj9 chord, you can use those split voicings to get a 5 note chord. Gmaj9 = 3x4435. Or, use one of my favorite voicings, the Gmaj13, which I will let you work out on your own, based on the examples in this post.

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Old 07-05-2013, 11:01 AM   #8
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Chord names are usually named to indicate harmonic function. Therefore, feel free to omit any note or notes you want, so long as it still retains its function.
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