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Old 04-19-2013, 01:01 AM   #1
chronic_stp
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Neapolitan chords with added seven

I just learned about neapolitan chords in theory and I'm analyzing a Shubert piece for homework and I came across a neapolitan chord in root position with an added major seven. Can sevenths be added to the neapolitan chord or is it going to end up being some kind of secondary dominant chord? The key is d minor and the chord in question contains Eb G Bb, and and D

Edit: The chord is followed by a C# dim chord in second inversion. A root position neapolitan chord comes before the chord.

Last edited by chronic_stp : 04-19-2013 at 01:19 AM.
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Old 04-19-2013, 01:16 AM   #2
AWACS
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This is what wiki said, if it doesn't help you I'm sorry. Reg's, don't chew my head off for this please.

"The Neapolitan sixth chord is particularly common in minor keys. As a simple alteration of the subdominant triad (iv) of the minor mode, it provides contrast as a major chord compared to the minor subdominant or the diminished supertonic triad. The most common variation on the Neapolitan chord is the Neapolitan major seventh, which adds a major seventh to the chord (this also happens to be the tonic). "
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Old 04-19-2013, 01:21 AM   #3
chronic_stp
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AWACS
This is what wiki said, if it doesn't help you I'm sorry. Reg's, don't chew my head off for this please.

"The Neapolitan sixth chord is particularly common in minor keys. As a simple alteration of the subdominant triad (iv) of the minor mode, it provides contrast as a major chord compared to the minor subdominant or the diminished supertonic triad. The most common variation on the Neapolitan chord is the Neapolitan major seventh, which adds a major seventh to the chord (this also happens to be the tonic). "


Thanks man! I scanned over the wikipedia page real fast but didn't notice that.

BTW, nice avatar.

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Old 04-20-2013, 03:03 AM   #4
AWACS
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chronic_stp
Thanks man! I scanned over the wikipedia page real fast but didn't notice that.

BTW, nice avatar.


You as well. Pelican - Australipithicus...? iirc
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Old 05-02-2013, 05:28 PM   #5
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There are many instances in the Post-Romantic, especially, where Neapolitans are voiced in root position with either:

1. Maj-min seventh quality (N7)
2. Maj seventh quality (NM7)
3. Minor-min seventh quality (n7)

However, it can be argued that the minor Neapolitan is really the ii of IV since it almost always comes before the V of N and not after.

That is cool that you found an early example of a Neapolitan seventh as in Schubert.

As for the other question, as to if an N7 is really a secondary dominant, you need to look at the previous and following chords for that determination. Usually the N chord is a subdominant substitute, and it would, in theory have to function as the secondary dominant of the tritone-rooted chord, which would be odd.

However, it could be seen as a German Sixth of a various number of scale degrees in an unusual voicing. I have seen many examples of this.
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Old 05-03-2013, 12:14 AM   #6
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Both of your avatars suck to me. One is black with a bit of dog shit shaped to something in the middle, the other is orange shit with yellow shit.
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