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Old 06-26-2013, 02:30 PM   #21
DBKGUITAR
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MattyBoy 1337
I agree with all this. But I guess I was just assuming that the TS was assuming that modes were simply scales, so I was speaking from that point of view.
I agree that learning for learning's sake is good too. In my earlier years of writing music, I suffered a bit from scale dependance, and many others I knew did too. I couldn't write anything worthwhile without looking up some scale pattern to make my music "fit" with theory. This was because I didn't know how to separate scales from music, and also because I thought modes were just scales.

I feel it's important to properly contextualize the things you learn so that you don't get mixed up in inefficient thought processes. I feel that (based on my personal experience), that that's where the TS is headed. I went there too.


So you mean that I should focus on learning the major and minor scales and adding accidentals with freedom without feeling restricted by the use of a scale right? So by that I acquire musical freedom, or that's what i understand xD


And yes I thought that modes were the same as scales, with their same notes but with a different tonic :/
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Old 06-26-2013, 02:42 PM   #22
MattyBoy 1337
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DBKGUITAR
So you mean that I should focus on learning the major and minor scales and adding accidentals with freedom without feeling restricted by the use of a scale right? So by that I acquire musical freedom, or that's what i understand xD


And yes I thought that modes were the same as scales, with their same notes but with a different tonic :/


I think that would be a much better course of action for you, yes. No need to bog yourself down with names that might not actually help you in your musical goals. Once you learn about the major and minor scales, you should read up about functional harmony so you can see how it's often applied. Then break those conventions however you want.
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Old 06-26-2013, 03:02 PM   #23
DBKGUITAR
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MattyBoy 1337
I think that would be a much better course of action for you, yes. No need to bog yourself down with names that might not actually help you in your musical goals. Once you learn about the major and minor scales, you should read up about functional harmony so you can see how it's often applied. Then break those conventions however you want.

Arigato gozaimasu! Thank you very much

I will do what you told me, I'll bump this thread when I finally understand everything ^^
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Old 06-26-2013, 08:15 PM   #24
cdgraves
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You should focus on the basic major and minor scales, and learning the chords to them.

Make sure you understand how chords work! Remember that no matter what, you're always playing to the harmony. An understanding of harmony will guide your use of scales.
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