Go Back   UG Community @ Ultimate-Guitar.Com > Instruments > Guitar Techniques
User Name  
Password
Search:

Reply
Old 05-08-2013, 08:54 AM   #1
sundar334
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Identifying Strumming Pattern

Hi, i am a beginner learning guitar from a book and whenever i try to practise the song in the cd i am unable to make out the strumming pattern used in the song by listening to it, the chords used in the song are given in the book but not the strumming pattern. From the forum here i got to know that listening is the best way to identify the strumming pattern but i am just not able to do it. Can someone help me with this? also can someone link me to the page where i can find common strumming pattern for different time signature?
sundar334 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-2013, 09:00 AM   #2
gijsheijnen84
Gijs Heijnen
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Which chords are used in the progression? Maybe there's some songs out there in the same progression that are easier to learn.
gijsheijnen84 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-2013, 09:03 AM   #3
sundar334
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Quote:
Originally Posted by gijsheijnen84
Which chords are used in the progression? Maybe there's some songs out there in the same progression that are easier to learn.

Simple ones like "worried Man blues", "pay me my money down" i can play the chords involved in them easily , i just don't know which strumming pattern would be appropriate for a particular song
sundar334 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-2013, 09:10 AM   #4
fanapathy
B-Tuned
 
fanapathy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
^How does which chords are used have anything to do with the strumming pattern?

It does come down to ear training, you got to listen really closely to the rhythm and when you hear strokes. If possible, try slowing down the song so it's easier to hear. The strumming hand almost always follows the rhythm (goes up and down without hitting the strings) during pauses, this will help determine if next strokes are up or down. Drums also often follow the strokes in some way so that can also help.

If you have any examples I'd be happy to help figure it out and explain how
fanapathy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-2013, 09:18 AM   #5
sundar334
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Quote:
Originally Posted by fanapathy
^How does which chords are used have anything to do with the strumming pattern?

It does come down to ear training, you got to listen really closely to the rhythm and when you hear strokes. If possible, try slowing down the song so it's easier to hear. The strumming hand almost always follows the rhythm (goes up and down without hitting the strings) during pauses, this will help determine if next strokes are up or down. Drums also often follow the strokes in some way so that can also help.

If you have any examples I'd be happy to help figure it out and explain how

I am new here so i don't know where to upload the track so i have uploaded it in "My Mp3" can you explain with that track as an example?
sundar334 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-2013, 09:39 AM   #6
fanapathy
B-Tuned
 
fanapathy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Quote:
Originally Posted by sundar334
I am new here so i don't know where to upload the track so i have uploaded it in "My Mp3" can you explain with that track as an example?


OK from quick listening - in this case;
On the first beat it sounds like just the bass note of the chord is played (it's not a real strum), then two strums (of the higher strings).
Then the 2nd note of the chord with the two same strums and that's the pattern. This seems to be reversed a few bars later.

So if using 4/4 time signature
(D)-DU, (D)-DU, (D)-DU, (D)-DU
For each measure, the durations: (D) would be 1/8th note, then the strums are 16ths

So if casually playing along you could just go Down-DownUp
Hope that made sense
fanapathy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-2013, 09:40 AM   #7
gijsheijnen84
Gijs Heijnen
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Quote:
Originally Posted by fanapathy
^How does which chords are used have anything to do with the strumming pattern?

It does come down to ear training, you got to listen really closely to the rhythm and when you hear strokes. If possible, try slowing down the song so it's easier to hear. The strumming hand almost always follows the rhythm (goes up and down without hitting the strings) during pauses, this will help determine if next strokes are up or down. Drums also often follow the strokes in some way so that can also help.

If you have any examples I'd be happy to help figure it out and explain how


That's true mate. But I thought maybe he could find some songs with the same progression where the rhythm parts are more clear. Good tips anyway
gijsheijnen84 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-2013, 09:42 AM   #8
sundar334
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Quote:
Originally Posted by fanapathy
OK from quick listening - in this case;
On the first beat it sounds like just the bass note of the chord is played (it's not a real strum), then two strums (of the higher strings).
Then the 2nd note of the chord with the two same strums and that's the pattern. This seems to be reversed a few bars later.

So if using 4/4 time signature
(D)-DU, (D)-DU, (D)-DU, (D)-DU
For each measure, the durations: (D) would be 1/8th note, then the strums are 16ths

So if casually playing along you could just go Down-DownUp
Hope that made sense

Thanks man, jus played it and sounds about right. So if the song is basically in 4/4 time signature do i jus have to keep on experimenting with the strumming pattern till it sounds right?
sundar334 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-2013, 09:54 AM   #9
fanapathy
B-Tuned
 
fanapathy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
^Well just keep listening to the songs and playing along until you think you got it. Developing a good ear for music is part of becoming a guitar player. As you get better with listening to music, you will become less dependent of things like tabs or chord charts. You'll also get used to a lot of rhythms. Like the rhythm of this song is very common in country music as well as some other genres
fanapathy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2013, 04:51 AM   #10
jackiechan1234
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2013
Quote:
Originally Posted by fanapathy
^How does which chords are used have anything to do with the strumming pattern?

It does come down to ear training, you got to listen really closely to the rhythm and when you hear strokes. If possible, try slowing down the song so it's easier to hear. The strumming hand almost always follows the rhythm (goes up and down without hitting the strings) during pauses, this will help determine if next strokes are up or down. Drums also often follow the strokes in some way so that can also help.

If you have any examples I'd be happy to help figure it out and explain how


Hi fanapathy,

i also have a hard time identifying strum patterns. do you think you can help me get this one down? I spent a few hours listening to it and i still cant figure it out.

thanks

youtube(dot)com/watch?v=6Nrx-kHa0SU

Last edited by jackiechan1234 : 05-12-2013 at 04:56 AM.
jackiechan1234 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 11:45 PM.

Forum Archives / About / Terms of Use / Advertise / Contact / Ultimate-Guitar.Com © 2014
Powered by: vBulletin Version 3.0.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.