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Old 06-24-2013, 11:42 PM   #1
CJGunner7
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Stuck in the Pentatonics

Hey guys

My problem is when i improvise i am always stuck in the pentatonic scale shape of basically only using 3 frets, i feel like i'm stuck in a box and i don't how to get out, when i improvise it feels so mechanical because the pen. scale aren't the best sounding scale, can you please give me some scales that will help me improve my soloing and please no more pentatonics haha

Cheers.
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Old 06-25-2013, 12:10 AM   #2
JAHellraiser
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major and minor would be a good start. they both overlap with the pentatonic to some degree, so you'll have a good base to start on.
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Old 06-25-2013, 12:41 AM   #3
In-Flight-Radio
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For sure learn the Major scale and all of its modes, in every key. Also be sure to learn those notes everywhere on fret board. C minor pentatonic is not one little shape. It is every C, D#, F, G and A# note, no matter where it is. Learn to pay attention to what notes you are hitting, and when. Why does a D note sound great over a C minor chord? because it is the 9th scale degree.
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Old 06-25-2013, 12:46 AM   #4
Wicer
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What first reply said to a further degree, basically you take the position you are in and transpose the root note down 3 half steps or 3 frets. So if you are in A minor pentatonic, assuming we're only looking at the 1st position, you're root is 5 on the low e, then you will shift your root down to F# (2nd fret) on the low e for your major scale.

The most important thing about mixing major/minor pentatonic scales is that a song in a major key can be soloed in both the major and minor pentatonic scales, but a song in a minor key can only be soloed in the minor pentatonic.

Ex) Comfortably Numb is B minor pentatonic. Walk of Life (Dire Straits) is in E major, so your major scale's root is on the 9th fret making it E major pentatonic (But is exactly the same as F# minor pentatonic) or E minor pentatonic.

Last edited by Wicer : 06-25-2013 at 08:40 AM.
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Old 06-25-2013, 02:30 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CJGunner7
Hey guys

My problem is when i improvise i am always stuck in the pentatonic scale shape of basically only using 3 frets, i feel like i'm stuck in a box and i don't how to get out, when i improvise it feels so mechanical because the pen. scale aren't the best sounding scale, can you please give me some scales that will help me improve my soloing and please no more pentatonics haha

Cheers.


Actually the 'mechanical' sound you're talking about his little to nothing to do with the scale you're using. You need to stop just playing the shapes you know and running over licks you've played a million times and start thinking about what you're doing; have more consideration for the sound you want to make and think about how your going to achieve that.
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Old 06-25-2013, 11:57 AM   #6
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Zaphod's approach is what I'm currently doing, and it serves me really well. What helped me break the box shapes was the "Hopscotch method", search it up on youtube! A guy named Joe Cifeo or something made the lesson, and it's really useful!
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Old 06-25-2013, 12:42 PM   #7
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do some homeowork on "melodic control" and "chord tone soloing" and things will make more sense
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Old 06-29-2013, 10:58 AM   #8
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Play anything and everything by ear. If you see a commercial with some music imitate it with your guitar. Listen to a wide variety of music, no matter the instrument, imitate it with your guitar. It will teach how to compose a multitude of sound as well as teach you new licks. Another example is jazz, i listen to that shit and play along the trumpet.
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Old 06-29-2013, 01:01 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by SpaceCrabs
Play anything and everything by ear. If you see a commercial with some music imitate it with your guitar. Listen to a wide variety of music, no matter the instrument, imitate it with your guitar. It will teach how to compose a multitude of sound as well as teach you new licks. Another example is jazz, i listen to that shit and play along the trumpet.


This post.

A good ear is better than knowing all the scales in the world. Cause a lot of people rely on scales to improvise. If you look at Victor Wooten's "Groove Workshop" DVD, you will see that all the guys in that room are great bass players, but when victor and anthony tell them to play and start comping them, they sound awful. That's cause they rely so much on knowing the key of the song, and if it's major or minor.

Learning to connect with your instrument so that you can playback what you hear is the ultimate goal you should work towards. I personally do as SpaceCrabs said, learn everything i want to play by ear. Learning a wide range of styles is great aswell, and learning from other instruments are very cool cause you overcome many problems with your technique during the process (Trying to emulate brass playing and piano playing on guitar is really fun, because they often make intervallic jumps we don't).

My advice is try doing these things, which are a part of my daily routine, and see if they work for you.

1. Learn songs you like by ear. It doesn't even have to be much. When i am working on jazz and fusion songs i might take out 10 seconds of the tune per day, depending on how hard the song is. Just use your ear to learn music.

2. Do improvisation exercises aswell. I like to play a chord or a short chord progression and then try to sing or hum a idea over it and then try to play it back instantly. You will be terrible at this for a long time, but it does wonders to your playing and phrasing.

That is my opinion on the matter, hope that helped.
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Old 06-30-2013, 10:32 AM   #10
CJGunner7
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Cheers mate, you have no idea how much better i feel about guitar after reading this, thank you.
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