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Old 02-01-2013, 06:25 AM   #1
dazzzer30
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lead / solo help

I want to learn to play lead guitar and would like to hear from other lead - solo players for any information that will help me . Although I am still new to the guitar I know music theory and play piano mostly in the key of C . I was learning the pentatonic 5 patterns but I didnít see the point in them other than it helps me find the major scale / minor scale on the fret board, so now I am learning the major scale instead of pentatonic scales which feels like it makes more sense to me to get a good over all knowledge of the notes on the fret board from the start , Also what other things will I need to know to play lead other than scales and at what point should I try to solo , When I play on piano I did a lot of work by ear and theory or guess work but I noticed a lot of people use lead tab sheets to copy the sole but I am sure there are people that can do a close version of the sole with out it ?
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Old 02-01-2013, 06:40 AM   #2
steven seagull
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Music is music, the same principles of theory and creativity that you woul apply to the piano apply equally to the guitar.

The only real difference is that your notes are in a different place.
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Old 02-01-2013, 07:05 AM   #3
deltadaz
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Did'nt see the point in learning the pentatonics...? great starting point for soloing
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Old 02-01-2013, 08:14 AM   #4
dazzzer30
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Originally Posted by deltadaz
Did'nt see the point in learning the pentatonics...? great starting point for soloing

what I meant to say was because I know the C major scale and used it a lot on piano it felt easier to keep the notes in that order rather than change them to the pentatonic scale . Plus I donít see soloing in major scales or pentatonic scale any different just you would have some extra notes to use when needed.
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Old 02-01-2013, 08:20 AM   #5
steven seagull
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If you already understand the major scale then i can kinda see why you'd wonder about pentatonics The most sensible way to you to approach them is to simply think of them as a diffferent way of using their respective major and minor counterparts. You're still using the major or minor scale, you're just choosing not to use the 2 least consonant intervals, the notes that are a bit trickier to use safely.

Don't think of things in terms of shapes, think in terms of sounds.
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Old 02-01-2013, 10:23 AM   #6
Drew-A
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The theory you learned on piano will help you learn the guitar. After all, the C major scale is the C major scale. What is different though is the fact that you can play the same notes is several different places on the guitar, unlike the piano.

So you'll have to learn a few "positions" to be able to play over the range of the guitar. The good thing though, is that once you have a couple of these patterns down, it's simply a matter of "moving" the shape to change the key.

Pentatonics are a good place to start. They are not physically hard to play, and form the basis of a lot of rock music. If you use them musically and practice phrasing, bending and vibrato as well as the different positions, you'll be off to a great start!

Last edited by Drew-A : 02-01-2013 at 08:34 PM.
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