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Old 08-02-2008, 01:18 AM   #61
BrainDamage
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^^Surely, Shirley.
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How to achieve Frank Zappa's guitar tone:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thefallofman
Step 1: Buy a Gibson SG
Step 2: Insert Green Ringer, EQ, 3 dead squirrels and a microwave into said SG
Step 3: Plug in and freak the **** out.
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Old 08-02-2008, 03:14 AM   #62
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Journey-Escape
Released July 1981



Steve Perry
- Lead Vocals
Neal Schon - Guitar, Vocals
Steve Smith - Drums
Jonathan Cain - Guitar, Keyboards, Vocals

Overview:
Released in July of 1981,Escape has become Journey's biggest selling album yet, and remains one of their most popular works to date. This was Journey's first album with Jonathan Cain who had replaced founding keyboardist Gregg Rolie.Escape has been certified 9x Platinum by RIAA since its release.And in September of '81 it stayed #1 on the Billboard album chart.

Trck Listing:

1. "Don't Stop Believing"(Jonathan Cain, Steve Perry, and Neal Schon) – 4:10- This song maybe be Journey's most popular song.With its memorable piano intro to the encouraging words sung by Steve Perry,it continues to be used by the media. Though this song has overshadowed many of Jouneys other songs. But it was still a hugh placing single with 8 on Mainstream Rock rock charts.

2."Stone in Love" – 4:25-(Jonathan Cain, Steve Perry, and Neal Schon)This song is definatly a jamming song.With a killer guitar intro,and again awesome vocals by Perry,to the very upbeat solo,this song is a sure Journey classic.This single reached #8 on the Mainstream Rock rock Chart.

3."Who's Crying Now" – 5:01-(Jonathan Cain, and Steve Perry)This song was the first single off the album and it reached # 4 on the Billboard Top 100 and the Mainstream Rock charts.The song is highlighted by Steve Perry's smooth, soulful lyrics, piano playing by Jonathan Cain which interludes with a bass riff by Ross Valory, and acoustic guitars.No eletric guitars until the end with Neal's solo.

4."Keep on Runnin'" – 3:39(Jonathan Cain, Steve Perry, and Neal Schon)This song isnt really that known but still fine none the less.Encouraging words with Perry and an awesome guitar part by Schon makes still makes this song good.Though its not there best work.To me Basically an album filler.

5."Still They Ride" – 3:49-(Jonathan Cain, Steve Perry, and Neal Schon)-Another Single off Escape,making it #19 on the Pop Singles Chart,# 37 on Adult Contemporary,and # 47 on Mainstream rock.This song starts off with the keyboards and drums to be then taken over by Perry's soulful singing.A pretty slow song for the majority of it.

6."Escape" – 5:16-(Jonathan Cain, Steve Perry, and Neal Schon)-This song starts off pretty heavy with a killer riff.Though its very repitive good none the less.
Has the same Jouney-ish kinda fell like the rest.

7."Lay it Down" – 4:13-(Jonathan Cain, Steve Perry, and Neal Schon)-I could never really get into this song.I beleive this song was never played live by the band.Though its greatly show Perry's vocal range.

8."Dead or Alive" – 3:20 -(Jonathan Cain, Steve Perry, and Neal Schon)Very upbeat song with a kinda bluesy feel to it.Very good guitar work from Neal Schon.

9."Mother, Father" – 5:28-(Matthew Schon,Neal Schon,Steve Perry,and Johnathan Cain)--This song is a song basically about the strength of a family.Starts off with a very sweet keyboard part.Again amzing vocals by Steve.Basically a very slow touching song.

10."Open Arms" – 3:18-(Jonathan Cain, and Steve Perry)-This song today still continues to be a very sweet loving song.It is a ballad depicting the struggle of lovers who are trying to reconcile by starting anew with "open arms".Starts off with a very sweet piano part.The song and its status as a power ballad has been remembered years following its original release.

Random Fact:-This album was also made into a a video game for the Atari 2600 console.The player must lead the band members to their "Scarab Escape Vehicle" (as featured on the cover) and protect the concert cash from crazy groupies, sneaky photographers, stage barriers and dishonest promoters.

Final Words:-This album is a fine piece of work.If you want to get into Jouney then this album is a must have.

Overall Score:9/10
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Old 09-01-2008, 02:21 AM   #63
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I do everything myself from writing all the lyrics, writing the musical parts, singing all vocals, playing all the instruments, Recording Engineer & the Production work.
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Old 09-01-2008, 10:46 AM   #64
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Quote:
Originally Posted by williamgeorge
I do everything myself from writing all the lyrics, writing the musical parts, singing all vocals, playing all the instruments, Recording Engineer & the Production work.
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Old 11-23-2008, 06:35 PM   #65
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Just thought I'd revive this a bit.
--------------

In Rock - Deep Purple (1970)


By 1970, Deep Purple were one of the top British acts of the day, releasing hit singles such as a cover of Joe South's song "Hush". But the wheels of change were in motion after the release of their 1969 album "Deep Purple" (excellent album), and the replacement of original vocalist Rod Evans and bassist Nick Simpler for Ian Gillan and Roger Glover would mark (II, actually) the beginning of a new era in hard rock. The new and improved Deep Purple met in studio in August 1969 to record their new album and, well, the rest is history. What spawned was one of the crowning peaks of hard rock, one that, along with Led Zeppelin's, Black Sabbath's, and Blue Oyster Cult's debuts, would redefine hard rock forever, and would pave the way for the genre we know and love as heavy metal. Anyway, onwards, let us plunge into this magnificent album.

Let's just say that it starts out exactly like a precursor of heavy metal should start: with a crazy explosion of distortion followed by a whammy barred solo by Blackmore, before segueing into a peaceful organ interlude by Lord with a foreshadowing of main riff. Yes, this is the beauty of "Speed King". After a long sustained note by Lord, the listener knows that something is coming, but he can't possibly expect what is lurking ahead. Then all of a sudden is hit by such a massive riff that he can't help but headbang. Awesome chorus with Gillan showing of his impressive pipes. However, a listener to Deep Purple should realise that they weren't really about the vocals, only their no-holds-bar hard rocking. The only well written and thought full lyrics in this album are in "Child in Time"

Anyway, the song continues with nice interlocked soloing between Blackmore and Lord, and an amazing return to another theme, spiraling up up up, upwards into the sky. Trademark wailing screams by Gillan continue throughout the song, and it ends just like it started: in a twisted hunk of metal, drenched of feedback. Out of breath? Good, that what they wanted. Better catch your breath...quick.

"Bloodsucker" has one of the more vicious riffs of the album. An absolutely killer, this riff is one of my favourite of all time, and very underrated. The listeners again hears the piercing shrieks of Gillan that tell of (good) things to come in the next track. After a few verses and choruses, the solos kick in. Some great solos from Blackmore, and especially Lord, which are fragmented and interspersed between each other, separated by the second riff. Fades in the end. We've only just begun.

The peaceful opening of "Child in Time" allows the listener to sit back and relax a little bit after the intensity of the first two tracks. Lord calmly solos on his organ until Gillan enters with equally calm vocals, depicting "Child in Time" as an anti-war song. However, this sense of calm is very deceiving, and once he utters the words "Wait for the ricochet", the ghostly wails begin, softly at first, and slowly building and building, until they become banshee like, all behind the driving instrumental theme, which purveys throughout the beginning. The momentum of these screams helps propel this song into a very militaristic-like bridge, and straight into a Blackmore solo, which, personally, contains some of the sweetest tone that I've heard. Those first few notes make my spine tingle (side note: one reason why I don't like live version of the song as much as the studio version is because of the absence of this part). Nice Lord organ underneath the solo, until it finally kicks off into the driving hard rock riff, supplied by Glover's amazing bass. Hysteria ensues as Blackmore tears up his precious guitar, racing up and down the neck. In return, the listener is presented for the next two minutes to perhaps the greatest rock solo on the face of the earth. Just as things are winding down, Lord jumps in with an great ascending and descending riff on his organ, which is promptly repeated by Blackmore, and underneath mimicked by Paice (banging on his drum like a madman), until it all goes quiet, and we again hear the main theme, Lord again with his calm soloing. Gillan re-enters and pulls the same stunts he did in the first part of the song. It then ends with a chromatic rising scale, and then quickly descends (includes complimentary shrieks by Gillan), ending in one final chord and a few extra stray, broken notes (including one that sounds a lot like a sitar), the lasts remnant of that magnificent piece of work. Thus ends the greatest song that Deep Purple has ever done.

"Flight of the Rat" is a nice, hard rocking piece, with an excellent rhythm section. Side note: props have to go to Ian Paice and Roger Glover. They were one of the greatest rhythm sections of the era, and don't get nearly enough love. Anyway, there are some good ascending lick that Blackmore does in the chorus. Fast paced and vicious soloing by Lord and then Blackmore (starts off in the lower registries, and really doesn’t move up there too much). It's a very spaced out solo with a lot of whammy, which Blackmore seems to be very fond of. Then there is a nice slowly building bridge into a very funky solo replete with wah-wah that one might expect to find on a Funkadelic album. The music suddenly stops and flies (hehe) into the main riff. it then launches into a great drum solo by Paice, with more of that funky rhythm that was seen during Blackmore’s solo, until it reaches a climax when Glover keeps hitting one sustained note on his bass, and then the song descends into that same hard rocking riff, until it is all finally over, finished off by a slowly building excellent drum solo by Paice.

"Into the Fire" features a mega-heavy, hulking riff, worthy of sacrifice to the gods, until they kick off to some type of warped heavy metal polka in the verse with a nice vocal delivery in the chorus. Some nice soloing by Blackmore, but nothing really special. While the riff is especially noteworthy, and has a very catchy chorus, it isn't the greatest they've ever done.

"Living Wreck" opens up with a nice groovy beat by Paice and kicks off with a Hammond “cougar scream” by Lord, and a very groovy riff that again would not be out of place in a funk rock album. Gillan’s vocals are a lot softer on this song than any other on the album. More "cougar screams" courtesy of Lord (damn those are awesome). Blackmore continues with a nice spaced out solo with a faint hint of oriental influence (Maggot Brain anyone?) After him, Lord kicks off a solo, which is nothing to the calibre, of say, Highway Star, but it’s pretty nice. Fade to black, and off we go to the final song on the album.

In "Hard Lovin' Man", gongs predominate the beginning, with scratchy guitar parts that are reminiscent of "Speed King". Glover opens up the riff, and Blackmore follows suit. Lord starts smashing on some random keys and creates an awesome effect until finally embarking on his short overdriven solo. More piercing shrieks from Gillan, each of which throw the song into one of Lord’s organ themes. Lord solos again: at first listen, it may be hard to understand what the hell he is doing, but his atonal, and sometimes unpleasant, soloing starts to sound better after a few listens. One gong and then Blackmore starts his solo (which seems to be double tracked, like those of Tony Iommi: a nice effect). A nice little solo, with him racing upwards on the neckboard. The song is then thrown upside down, with tons of feedback, a whammied Blackmore solo (again) with excellent stereo panning (the band is faded and then returns), until the songs ends in a incomprehensible mess of feedback and stereo panning. Thus ends the legendary album. But wait, there's more!


I decided to review "Black Night", Deep Purple's single of the time, because it is included (with many other extras) on the 25th Anniversary Edition of "In Rock", so here we go. "Black Night" has a nice riff, but Blackmore obviously ripped it from the Blues Magoos, from their song "(We Ain't Got) Nothin' Yet". Nonetheless, amazing basswork from Glover. Blackmore treats us once again with a totally spaced out solo filled with whammy bar up the ass, which segues into an alright solo by Lord, again, nothing special on his part, until it then segues into the main riff, with amazing drumfills by Paice. The song ends with more frantic fretwork and whammy bombs by Blackmore, until it slowly fades to silence.


"In Rock", the first true heavy metal album that Deep Purple released, came just around the time of debuts of the other big heavy metal precursors of the time: Black Sabbath, Led Zeppelin, Blue Oyster Cult. Many would say that Deep Purple's album "Machine Head" is the height of the early heavy metal scene, replete with rocking riffs and frantic soloing, and I tend to agree, but I still enjoy "In Rock" the most out of all of them, primarily because of the first first 3 songs, though all of them are spectacular. Mark II Deep Purple would go on to refine this kick-ass form of hard rock in their next two albums, "Fireball" and "Machine Head", until finally succumbing the fate that occurs to all bands: mediocrity. Since then, no Deep Purple album has been able to even come close to the brilliance of that era, from 1970-1972. Very unfortunate. Blackmore was fed up with the band, and went on to form Rainbow with Ronnie James Dio, another excellent band which I may review later.


Deep Purple died after "Machine Head". But after "In Rock", the world would never be the same again.

Five Stars out of Five
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Old 12-18-2008, 08:04 PM   #66
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I think someone should do a review of an album they don't love. I think every review has been at least a 4 or 5
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Old 12-18-2008, 08:32 PM   #67
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You do a review then .
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Old 01-10-2009, 06:11 AM   #68
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Does someone still have the older album reviews? I wrote one for Van Halen II a while back.

If not, I'm willing to redo it and do other Van Halen albums.
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Old 01-15-2009, 02:23 AM   #69
BrainDamage
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^^They're probably in the archives. You can write new ones if you want though. Check out the Classic Rock Encyclopedia thread.

***ATTENTION***
This thread will be closed and sent to the archives sometime in the near future, so all of you who want to review an album, please make your way over to the Classic Rock Encyclopedia thread.

Thank you kindly
__________________
How to achieve Frank Zappa's guitar tone:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thefallofman
Step 1: Buy a Gibson SG
Step 2: Insert Green Ringer, EQ, 3 dead squirrels and a microwave into said SG
Step 3: Plug in and freak the **** out.
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Old 01-15-2009, 09:42 PM   #70
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And so ends The Classic Rock Album Review Project. Thank you to all who participated, and remember to continue writing and submitting your work to the Classic Rock Encyclopedia.

***CLOSED***

__________________
How to achieve Frank Zappa's guitar tone:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thefallofman
Step 1: Buy a Gibson SG
Step 2: Insert Green Ringer, EQ, 3 dead squirrels and a microwave into said SG
Step 3: Plug in and freak the **** out.
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