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Old 01-07-2015, 02:05 AM   #301
StewieSwan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Metallicuh
I just got a Celestron Astromaster 114 EQ today. I'm so excited to see the moon and some of the closer planets.

and honestly, how does the hubble get images of all these galaxies but not a decent picture of pluto?



There's two main problems with imaging closer objects. Firstly, a lot of objects in our own galaxy lie along the plane of the Milky Way, so there's a lot of crap that's in the way that distorts or obscures the images. Secondly, many of the distant objects are actually quite large, but the problem is that they're so faint that we can't see them with the naked eye. The Andromeda galaxy is actually about twice the side of the moon on the sky, but it's just so distant that it's too faint to see.. A long exposure camera like Hubble can image it quite well, despite its distance.
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Old 01-07-2015, 11:01 AM   #302
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Good bump Stewie

That pic of the Pillars of Creation in IR is glorious. I'm glad that some of the nebula is thick/dark enough to not be entirely invisible in the infrared, really creates a work of art against the enhanced starscape backdrop.
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Old 01-07-2015, 05:02 PM   #303
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Here's something I was reading about a few months ago but it still blows my mind. Gotta share it with people who will most likely appreciate it
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Old 01-12-2015, 12:08 AM   #304
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I came across a recent article that really made me think. According to the author, there is something called "Dark Matter," which can't be reconciled. It is missing. But according to this work, this missing stuff is because the universe is part of something bigger.

If you think about it, everything though a microscope looks like "little universes," so why can't the same thing work the other way around? We are part of something bigger. Our universe makes up matter that is bigger than us.

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Old 01-12-2015, 12:37 AM   #305
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Originally Posted by ron666
I came across a recent article that really made me think. According to the author, there is something called "Dark Matter," which can't be reconciled. It is missing. But according to this work, this missing stuff is because the universe is part of something bigger.

If you think about it, everything though a microscope looks like "little universes," so why can't the same thing work the other way around? We are part of something bigger. Our universe makes up matter that is bigger than us.

ron666



Dark matter is "missing" because it doesn't interact with light, not because it's some crazy metaphysical magic. Let's keep it scientific and not have the "what if the universe is just an atom" discussion.
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Old 01-12-2015, 02:38 AM   #306
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there is something called "Dark Matter," which can't be reconciled. It is missing.

Missing? I don't think so. It is the name scientists have given the matter that must be there but we do not currently have the means to research it. Same with dark energy. It's there all right, but we don't yet understand the nature of it.

It's really interesting stuff.
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Old 01-16-2015, 09:35 PM   #307
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To echo the two above me, dark matter isn't really that mysterious or new-agey; it's able to be studied by the manner in which it gravitationally reacts (such as via gravitational lensing in imagery) with light and other matter. It is, however, invisible against the blackness of the void behind it and is therefore impossible (currently, as far as I know) to directly observe.

'Dark energy' is a bit different tho -- alleged to be the explanation for the acceleration of the expansion of the universe.

On a different note, did you guys know that in addition to all the other ways in which NASA is awesome, they also give away a ton of their history publications (which are professional quality) for free, as long as you pay for shipping?

http://www.hq.nasa.gov/office/hqlibrary/ic/ic2.htm#pubs

I ordered 7 from there today

Rockets and People (all 4 volumes)
On the Shoulders of Titans
This New Ocean (this will be second 'space' history book titled This New Ocean)
Challenge to Apollo
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Old 01-16-2015, 09:44 PM   #308
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On a different note, did you guys know that in addition to all the other ways in which NASA is awesome, they also give away a ton of their history publications (which are professional quality) for free, as long as you pay for shipping?

http://www.hq.nasa.gov/office/hqlibrary/ic/ic2.htm#pubs

I ordered 7 from there today


That is some dope shit
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Old 01-16-2015, 09:46 PM   #309
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That is some dope shit


Indeed
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Old 02-10-2015, 11:11 PM   #310
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So two new things happened.


Firstly, as a follow up to my last post, there have been some visible light images of Pluto and Charon released from the New Horizons approach.

https://encrypted-tbn1.gstatic.com/...6h1iyKrDkbkJKBp

It's pretty unimpressive, but it's just a taste of what's to come in coming months. I still think it's rad that we are gonna be among the first humans to see what Pluto actually looks like up close.


Secondly, there's this: http://www.hngn.com/articles/68295/...ot-the-case.htm


Media outlets (including IFLS, sadly) have misreported this as "the big bang didn't happen" and Christians, pseudointellectuals, and science-illiterates are gobbling it up like egg-drop soup. I'm glad this article maintains its integrity amongst the sea of idiotic "lol told u god did it" nonsense is ruling all the comments sections atm.



Also, I wish this thread was more active. Seems like only me and Dread really care about it
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Old 02-11-2015, 03:46 AM   #311
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^Heard about that this arvo. Workmate said something about quantum physics. But hang on I thought the big bang would be more favourable to Christians/creation/ID proponents? Implications of a beginning and all. Or is that what you mean, they are all "told you" because big bang is still believed to have happened?

Quote:
"Unfortunately many articles confuse 'no singularity' with 'no big bang,'" he continued.
Amateurs.

And I can care
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Old 02-26-2015, 03:05 AM   #312
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Pretty excited for these bright spots to be explored and understood

http://www.nasa.gov/jpl/dawn/bright...ml#.VO7Ev_nF98E

Also excited for this spacecraft because space weather is a specific topic of special interest to me

http://www.nasa.gov/press/2015/febr...ml#.VO7FZ_nF98E
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Old 02-26-2015, 02:32 PM   #313
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ye i've been watching those bright spots all week.
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Old 02-26-2015, 04:33 PM   #314
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Originally Posted by ron666
I came across a recent article that really made me think. According to the author, there is something called "Dark Matter," which can't be reconciled. It is missing. But according to this work, this missing stuff is because the universe is part of something bigger.

If you think about it, everything though a microscope looks like "little universes," so why can't the same thing work the other way around? We are part of something bigger. Our universe makes up matter that is bigger than us.

Can you provide a link? It might help your credibility.

There are some mainstream physicists who theorize that there may be additional dimensions, such as a fifth that they call, "the bulk," and many attempts to reconcile QM with relativity involve addition of dimensions as in String Theory, Superstring Theory, M-Theory and so forth.

There is also the Multiverse concept, which is a neat idea, but unfalsifiable as far as I know. Our universe could be one of any number of others that exist as a part of a larger something-or-other, and interactions with other "universes" may explain dark energy, as a possibility.

This is, at least at this point, not observable and therefore cannot be considered a theory as far as I'm aware. The fact that physicists have pondered the possibility that there might be an infinite number of "alternate universes," including one in which I typed your post and you responded with what I'm typing, for example, is pretty interesting as an aside.

That doesn't make it scientific. Fun to think about when you're seven.
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Old 02-27-2015, 04:37 PM   #315
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http://www.forbes.com/sites/brucedo...linkId=12571342

Potential means of testing/measuring effects of additional dimensions/multiverse!

Love science.
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Old 02-27-2015, 06:02 PM   #316
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that link takes me to a "thought of the day" and the continue to site link doesn't do anything. g1
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Old 02-27-2015, 06:07 PM   #317
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For decades, the root cause of our Milky Way galaxy’s “bulk flow” in the direction of the Centaurus and Hydra constellations has retained an air of mystery. Our own star’s motion through the Milky Way is relatively well understood. But a full understanding of the exact forces driving our Local Group of galaxies’ peculiar velocities at rates of 631 kilometers-per-second remains elusive.

Quite apart from our universe’s long-documented inflationary expansion (known as the Hubble Expansion), the local cosmos — which surrounds us over millions of light years — has its own peculiar trajectory and velocity.

What is known is that we are moving in bulk towards the Great Attractor (a region of half a dozen galaxy clusters some 150 million light years away), and the Shapley Concentration (a supercluster of galaxies some three times farther distant).
Hubble Space Telescope view towards the Great Attractor. Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA

Hubble Space Telescope view towards the Great Attractor. Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA

Is this just the result of gravity towards more massive and much more distant galaxy superclusters, or could such gravitational flows represent something more exotic?

A paper just submitted to the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (MNRAS) details cosmological distance measurements from some 8000 objects, most of which were from within our own Laniakea supercluster. As reported last September by Brent Tully, a cosmologist at the University of Hawaii in Manoa and colleagues in the journal Nature, the Milky Way is actually an outlier of this newly-named supercluster whose estimated 100,000 galaxies span some 500 million light years.

Yehuda Hoffmann, an astronomer at Israel’s Hebrew University, and colleagues used the Cosmicflows-2 catalogue (CF-2), “the largest and most accurate ever catalog of galaxy peculiar velocities” to reconstruct a large segment of our local cosmos’ large scale structure.

“We [used] the CF-2 database to uncover the distribution of matter out to distances of hundreds of million of light years,” Hoffmann, the paper’s lead author, told Forbes. “Our main result is that the bulk velocity estimated from the CF-2 data is fully consistent with the standard model of cosmology.”

As Tully told Forbes, from our perspective, both “downtown Laniakea” and the Shapley supercluster lie in the same direction. “It’s the combination of these two things lined up like a spring tide that is pulling us. but we don’t yet have a full accounting for what’s causing our motion,” said Tully. “Until we can actually add up all the vectors and [still] come up with this number of 600 kilometers per second, there’s still an incomplete story.”

How do researchers actually use such data?

The team used 8000 separate distance measurements for their MNRAS paper; including 300 distances derived from Type 1a supernovae.

“If I can measure a distance to a galaxy then I can calculate what its Hubble Expansion would be,” said Tully. “I then look at the difference between the observed velocity and the part attributed to Hubble Expansion and the difference is this peculiar velocity.”

But when astronomers observe as far out as the Shapley Concentration, Tully says, they soon reach the far edges of their current data. And what is left to be determined is whether this bulk galactic flow ends at the Shapley supercluster or just keeps going.

Tully says there appears to be a bulk flow in the direction of Centaurus either due to the gravitational attraction of what Tully terms “downtown Laniakea” and the Shapley supercluster beyond, or some larger force acting on large swaths of the observable cosmos.

“If the bulk flow continues well beyond the Shapley Concentration then there’s something fundamental that we really don’t understand,” said Tully. “But we’re not going to know for sure until we get peculiar velocities of a factor of three farther in distance.”

If large sectors of the spacetime continuum are vectoring in certain directions and not just expanding uniformly like a rising cake, what could be causing such large scale perturbations?

If we’re entangled with another universe via a multiverse scenario, our universe might have extra curvature, Grant Mathews, a theoretical astrophysicist at the University of Notre Dame, told Forbes. So, instead of an expanding cosmos that manifests in the form of a perfectly spherical balloon, he says, that balloon would be stretched a little more in one direction than another. That, says Mathews, would be the result of the gravitational pull of a multiverse in either another sector of space-time or even another dimension.

Cosmologists continue to debate whether the movement that we measure locally is actually part of a larger cosmic bulk flow; one that is due to the quantum influence of a neighboring multiverse. However, the more prosaic and thus far observationally-supported rationale is that we’re just falling into a deep gravitational valley as a result of nearby superclusters like the Shapley Concentration.

When moving in one direction, there’s a Doppler blue shift, says Mathews, which many cosmologists think is responsible for the observed temperature differences on the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). In other words, due to the Doppler Effect, the CMB appears hotter in the direction we are moving than the direction we aren’t.

But one prediction of M theory — the more general version of cosmological String Theory — is that photons from the early universe would have an intrinsically different temperature, says Mathews. He notes that if this were indeed the case, it would lend credence to String Theory’s multiverse scenarios, which in part posits that this universe is simply one of many.

If so, our primordial universe’s connection to an extra-dimensional multiverse may have left a telltale imprint in the form of an anomalous temperature on the CMB itself. “[The] interpretation would be that the universe actually has a little bit higher temperature in one direction than another,” said Mathews.

When will the issue be put to rest?

As Mathews points out, it’s currently difficult to detect peculiar velocities beyond a distance of some 400 million light years. But when the LSST (Large Synoptic Survey Telescope) sees first light in 2021, he and colleagues speculate that if errors can be reduced, then a detection of the cosmos’ bulk flow out to some three billion light years might just be possible.

“Within a month of going online, the LSST could have enough data to solve this issue,” said Mathews.

copy-pasted for your enjoyment
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Old 02-27-2015, 06:12 PM   #318
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intradasting

u should consider deleting that tho idk how allowed it is to just paste whole articles
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Old 02-28-2015, 12:29 AM   #319
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Reposting this from the literature thread

My free NASA books finally showed up (about a week or more ago but I wasn't there to receive them):





The left stack is Rockets and People volumes 1-4
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