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Old 10-16-2013, 08:40 AM   #1
Frankieanime78
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Vocal Range Help, Head Voice Questions

Alright, so i'm a better than average singer, i've never had any lessons or anything, so I don't really know anything about it. And in my band i'm going to be doing lead vocals, so I really want to develop my voice. First off I don't know what my vocal range is. On the youtube video that tells you, from what i've tried, apparently i'm soprano, but I don't believe it because that's the highest on the spectrum right? The song that covers my vocal range best is "Road to Nowhere - Bullet For My Valentine" the highest note is in the chorus when he says "Sick" and that's literally the highest note I can clearly sing (Sometimes i'll crack when not warmed up). So if by that, are you able to tell me my vocal range? But than I listen to Memphis May Fire, and hear songs like "The Reality" and omg, I would love to be able to sing how he does in that song, I can hit the verses in bits and peices but the chorus is just way out of my range. And when I try to push it, it feels like my throat clamps shut (Hard to explain) and all definition from my voice is lost, and the only way I can go higher is if i'm singing through my nose or something which sounds just weak. Anyways, also when singing high notes for long periods of time it starts hurting basically where the bottom of the jaw meets the neck on the sides (Is that normal?) And i've heard of this "head voice" but don't exactly understand, but when I hit that "Sick" note it's not my chest voice anymore and the vibrations come from my neck or really high chest. Is the head voice a way to sing higher...? Well anyways sorry for all the text, and to summarize here are my questions.
1. If you listened to the song, what is my vocal range?
2. Am I able to develop my voice to sing even higher than what I can do comfortably?
3. Is head voice a way to sing higher? And if it is, how exactly do I do it?
I read how it's when the vibrations come from the top of your head, but that sounds ridiculous to me, I can't send my singing to my skull .-.
Anyways, thanks for the help (:
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Old 10-16-2013, 10:25 AM   #2
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Oh hey, I actually think I got this figured out, but I think I have a tenor voice.
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Old 10-16-2013, 01:49 PM   #3
Justin_43130
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Pretend you're talking like a girl or a little kid. That's your head voice, or falsetto. It will help you sing higher notes, but it will take a lot of practice to get it to sound as strong as your chest voice.
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Old 10-16-2013, 04:18 PM   #4
Tyson2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Justin_43130
Pretend you're talking like a girl or a little kid. That's your head voice, or falsetto. It will help you sing higher notes, but it will take a lot of practice to get it to sound as strong as your chest voice.


falsetto and head voice are completely different things. head voice is connected to your modal register, falsetto is not.
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Old 10-16-2013, 04:48 PM   #5
Frankieanime78
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Bla-bla-bla

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tyson2011
falsetto and head voice are completely different things. head voice is connected to your modal register, falsetto is not.


Haha kinda funny, the videos I looked up today for stuff like this all stressed the fact that "falsetto and head voice" are not the same, and there were arguments all over the comments... :b just kinda funny the first two posts are exactly that xP
Otherwise appreciate the help guys (:
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Old 10-16-2013, 07:20 PM   #6
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I'm currently working on getting my masters degree is vocal education, they aren't the same thing.
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Old 10-16-2013, 08:10 PM   #7
JackWhiteIsButts
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There is no argument, falsetto and head voice are completely different.
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Old 10-23-2013, 02:58 AM   #8
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Originally Posted by JackWhiteIsButts
There is no argument, falsetto and head voice are completely different.

As near as I can tell, many arguments stem from a difference in the terms used to describe the same registers.

Why some people use the term falsetto to describe what a classically trained singer knows as either head voice or upper register is beyond me, though.
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Last edited by queenofthenight : 10-23-2013 at 03:03 AM.
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Old 10-23-2013, 03:36 AM   #9
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Moved to Singing and Vocals subforum...
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Old 10-26-2013, 12:02 PM   #10
KrisHQ
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It's very confusing when people keep talking about falsetto, headvoice and chestvoice.
It's much easier just to forget about the terms headvoice and chestvoice, and think of both in terms of mixing.
Your "chestvoice" is your normal voice, the one you use when you talk and probably also when singing in your most comfortable register.
When people are talking about headvoice, what they are really referring to is mixing.
So what is mixing?
Think of it as only having your regular voice and your falsetto, as you start to blend these two (they resonate in different places anatomically) you start to mix.
The more falsetto your apply the more you mix.
The term headvoice is basically just mixing, but nobody agrees on how much mixing is required to determine something as headvoice.

Mixing can sound very falsetto-like, but is often recogniseable by it's power, the tone being more full. Distortion can be applied to mixing as well, so when people reach high-notes and distort their voices, they are still basically mixing but putting an extra "distortion" layer on top of the note.
I'll not go into detail about the various effects and modes of mixing, but this is the general idea. Feel free to ask questions though.
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