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Old 05-18-2013, 09:48 PM   #1
wonderlustking5
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Join Date: Mar 2013
Should I stay with a Classical guitar or get a Flamenco?

I ( at the moment ) only play gypsy music, mainly- Gogol Bordello

My problem is that Gogol songs are like 60/40 what I mean by that like 60% of their songs are strummed flamenco style and 40% are strummed with a pick. So should I stay with a classical or get a flamenco ?

Note: The guitarist in Gogol Bordello uses a Takamine TC132SC ( which I'm pretty sure its a classical guitar ) but still... he's a pro, im just a beginner.

Examples
http://youtu.be/EJlPG8lsYY0?t=1m31s - Flamenco

- Normal strumming
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Old 05-18-2013, 11:56 PM   #2
Captaincranky
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wonderlustking5
My problem is that Gogol songs are like 60/40 what I mean by that like 60% of their songs are strummed flamenco style and 40% are strummed with a pick. So should I stay with a classical or get a flamenco ?
The most salient difference between a classical and a flamenco guitar is the "golpeador", which basically strengthens the sound board so you can bang on it.

So, if you're moving forward with the notion of learning and using a lot of flamenco percussive playing, you should probably go for a "gypsy jazz" type instrument.

If not, then a standard nylon string guitar will suffice. You can play nylon strings on either instrument with a pick, it does shorten string life though.
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Old 05-19-2013, 10:06 AM   #3
Bikewer
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The traditional flamenco guitar is somewhat different from a classical... Cedar top, friction pegs, light construction, the "golpeador" to protect the soft cedar from the tapping....

However, most contemporary players seem happy to play a regular classical. Who wants to fool with friction tuners?
Easy enough to apply a stick-on golpeador plate. Not a bad idea at any rate, if you plan to use a pick now and then... Else your guitar will end up looking like Willie's.....
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Old 05-19-2013, 05:09 PM   #4
Captaincranky
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Originally Posted by Bikewer
The traditional flamenco guitar is somewhat different from a classical... Cedar top, friction pegs, light construction, the "golpeador" to protect the soft cedar from the tapping....

However, most contemporary players seem happy to play a regular classical. Who wants to fool with friction tuners?
Easy enough to apply a stick-on golpeador plate. Not a bad idea at any rate, if you plan to use a pick now and then... Else your guitar will end up looking like Willie's.....
I think the whole "friction tuner" idea is carrying the "traditional flamenco" concept a bit too far.

Here read this page from Sam Ash: http://www.samash.com/opencms/openc..._D ifferx.html and we can talk some more.

I'm throwing this Wiki page about "Gypsy Jazz" in for the sake of conversation. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gypsy_jazz It's the "mustache bridge" I get the biggest kick out of with these instruments..

Last edited by Captaincranky : 05-19-2013 at 05:16 PM.
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Old 05-20-2013, 09:50 AM   #5
Bikewer
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I admit that the last reading I did on the subject was some Guitar Player articles I read maybe 20 years ago.....
Likely the community has moved on.

There is a tendency for folks to use "Flamenco" to describe any vaguely Latin-flavored guitar style.....
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