Go Back   UG Community @ Ultimate-Guitar.Com > Music > Bands & Artists > Metal
User Name  
Password
Search:

Reply
Old 06-27-2009, 01:51 AM   #61
Z_cup_boy
i hate my username
 
Z_cup_boy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: in the void of cyberspace
I like Lizdst, Mendohhlson and Dvorak.


I need some pillage for how badly my spelling is.
Z_cup_boy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-27-2009, 02:14 AM   #62
konigstiger
Registered User
 
konigstiger's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
liszt, mendelssohn... in case you were wondering... Impressionistic era classical music is great.... liszt and debussy are great... complicated, and odd harmonically, less of the massive strokes and themes used by earlier composers...
__________________
Ibanez RG 550 (1989, MIJ)
--Peavey 5150--
Custom DIY 2x12
Peavey Bandit II
Ibanez AD 220 Analog Rack Delay
MXR Flanger (not the reissue)
MXR 10 Band EQ
Boss NS-2
Dunlop 95q Wah (broken)
Heavily Modded Strat
konigstiger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-27-2009, 02:33 AM   #63
Cianyx
UG Nerd
 
Cianyx's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Absurdistan
Quote:
Originally Posted by LucasGtrGod
Two (or sometimes more) melodies played simultaneously, which have been designed to create a new "master" melody when put together. Many rules and guidelines about counterpoint were established in the baroque period, in particular J.S. Bach had a huge hand in writing the rules of counterpoint.

By some it is considered the most important aspect of harmony. I disagree, but there are those out there that would prefer to teach counterpoint over harmony if that were given the chance.



I see. Sorry to use Metal as an example but would it be correct to say Tyr uses counterpoints? Or would it be just harmony or something else?
__________________
| (• ◡•)| (❍ᴥ❍ʋ)
Cianyx is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-27-2009, 05:49 AM   #64
Emenius Sleepus
Blaze above the ashes
 
Emenius Sleepus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Черный пес Петербург
My friend showed me a violin piece by Ciprian Porumbescu that's absolutely divine. And Thorbor, if it's not in 4/4 it's not music?
__________________
[i]
"Национальный танец русских - это на ваших ебаных могилах".
KULTURKAMPF
lastFM
Emenius Sleepus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-27-2009, 01:50 PM   #65
NosferatuZodd09
Maiden thread -> Barf
 
NosferatuZodd09's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Ask?
this one's definitely my favorite classical piece sadly the assholes never play the fugue either...

JS Bach's BWV 538 Toccata


it'd be nice if everyone put links to most of the other composers that arent... the most mainstream for us newbies... and to get some recommendations from here
NosferatuZodd09 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-28-2009, 03:52 AM   #66
jibran
Banned
 
jibran's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: In the kitchen with a screaming triple amputee
I like Phillip Glass alot. Minimalism rules.
And Romanticism. Gotta love Liszt.
jibran is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-28-2009, 04:11 AM   #67
LucasGtrGod
Wishes he was Mahler
 
LucasGtrGod's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Not in Perth
Meh, Minimalism never struck as anything but a seemingly adolescent and under thought rebellion against musical norms just for the sake of being rebellious. Most of it is boring as ****.

And to the guy that asked is that Tyr song was counterpoint, the answer is kind of. There are elements of counterpoint present but most of it is just straight harmony, with both lines moving in the same direction.

A good example of counterpoint in metal is the introduction to Opeth's In the Mist she was standing, or anything from Opeth during that initial period.
LucasGtrGod is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-28-2009, 04:56 AM   #68
jibran
Banned
 
jibran's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: In the kitchen with a screaming triple amputee
Quote:
Originally Posted by LucasGtrGod
Meh, Minimalism never struck as anything but a seemingly adolescent and under thought rebellion against musical norms just for the sake of being rebellious. Most of it is boring as ****.



I find it soothing in the repetition. Just enough.

Each to his own.
jibran is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-28-2009, 05:15 AM   #69
BR00TAL
Horizons of Chaos
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Wales
Debussy's music is a transcending experience for me.
BR00TAL is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-28-2009, 05:30 AM   #70
insideac
is present!
 
insideac's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: UG
Heres some of my recs for dark/romantic classical stuff.

Bach - Passacaglia : Very very dark full on church organ. You might recognize it ;D

Mozart - Lacrimosa : Saddest song Ive ever heard. Choir & Violin.

Mozart - Dies Irae : "Day of Wrath", alot of choir and violin as well.

Dimitri Shostakovich - Russian Waltz : Romantic sounding, but tinged with dark sounds.

Tchaikovsky - Marche Slave : This song sounds so evil it was used as the main riff in "Metal Heart", by Accept, which was covered by Dimmu Borgir.

Brahms - Hungarian Dance 4 : A sad hungarian/gypsy sounding song.
__________________






Need logos/layouts/sites/merch designs?

Contorted Visuals

Last edited by insideac : 06-28-2009 at 05:52 AM.
insideac is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-28-2009, 05:19 PM   #71
Night_Lights
I've been here too long
 
Night_Lights's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Auckland University, New Zealand
Do most people know what 'Classical' is, as opposed to 'Romantic' or 'Baroque'?


Oh, if you like chaos in so-called classical music, check out Schoenberg. Huge influence on 12 tone system-using bands like behold...the arctopus. Sounds like **** to most people, but hey... thats what some metal fans look for
Night_Lights is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-28-2009, 06:52 PM   #72
insideac
is present!
 
insideac's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: UG
Quote:
Originally Posted by Night_Lights
Do most people know what 'Classical' is, as opposed to 'Romantic' or 'Baroque'?


Oh, if you like chaos in so-called classical music, check out Schoenberg. Huge influence on 12 tone system-using bands like behold...the arctopus. Sounds like **** to most people, but hey... thats what some metal fans look for



Shoenberg sucks. Was your post directed at me? Classical here is used to engulf the genre as a whole, be it Romantic, Contemporary, Baroque, Renaissance, whatever.
__________________






Need logos/layouts/sites/merch designs?

Contorted Visuals
insideac is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-28-2009, 08:22 PM   #73
Conservationist
realist
 
Conservationist's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Quote:
Originally Posted by insideac
Shoenberg sucks.


I'm not a fan either. Classical is however a wide genre, with something for just about everybody.

Check this out:

Quote:
Metal Hall: Classical Forum

The net's oldest metal site has created a forum for classical music only.

As many of you know, classical and metal are similar through their use of narrative composition, where riffs fit together to form motifs and communicate change in experience.

This is why there is significant overlap between metal and classical fans, and why both musics have a stormy, powerful yet sensitive approach.

We are looking forward to connecting more of these fans with each other and more music they'll like, even if to outsiders it appears radically different.

For more information:

* Classical Music for Metal Fans
* What makes heavy metal heavy?


May the crossover begin!
__________________
DARK LEGIONS ARCHIVE
Conservationist is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-28-2009, 11:38 PM   #74
LucasGtrGod
Wishes he was Mahler
 
LucasGtrGod's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Not in Perth
I don't think they do, perhaps a definition is in order. Just because it annoys me when people murder genre conventions, I mean this is the metal forum, right.

Medieval Period (500 - 1400)
As this entire era was somewhat of a cultural vacuum for the Western world, with every body killing each other in the name of whatever gods they wanted to believe in, not much of this music survives. During this period no notation was written and generally all music was spread by mouth and of the style of monophonic chant. That was until 1150, where a number of musical theorists developed forms of generic rhythm known as "Rhythm Modes".

While not much has survived from this era look for:
Leonin
De la Halle


Renaissance Period (1400 - 1600)
At about the same time the greek treaties on education, the Trivium (Grammar, Logic and Rhetoric), was reintroduced into Europe after being preserved by the arab countries, the Renaissance kicked in. Now when refer to this as a type of music we are talking about a number of innovations: extended use of polyphony, development of bass instruments and development of keyboard type instruments such as the Harpsichord and Clavichord. Another big innovation of this period was the push to have music written down, while not particularly similar or as detailed as our current musical notation system, it was a start.

Select Composers:
J. Ockeghem
Josquin Des Prez

Baroque Period (1600 - 1750)
The first of the so called "Common Practice Periods", the Baroque Period was known for complex tonal counterpoint and the use of basso continuo. The Canzona, which is the origin of the Sonata form was also developed. And the major and minor systems for managing chromatacism and dissonance were also established. Keyboard instruments were also to become more popular which led to the spread and rise of "equal temperament" over "well temperament". Much music during this period was written for chamber halls, so different groups of instruments would be needed, this was the first time that an orchestra sized band would perform.

Select Composers:
J.S. Bach
T. Albinoni
A. Vivaldi
G.F. Handel

To be continued...

Last edited by LucasGtrGod : 06-29-2009 at 12:02 AM.
LucasGtrGod is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-28-2009, 11:50 PM   #75
Zaphikh
Custom User Title
 
Zaphikh's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Erik Satie, Claude Debussy and Frédéric Chopin take the cake for me. As commonplace as those names are, I love the music and have listened to them endlessly. Sure perhaps some obscure composer will pop up every now and then, but none have ever captured my attention longer than those three. There was a time when I listened to Alexander Scriabin for about a month, but returned to the former three right after that phase.

Zaphikh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-28-2009, 11:52 PM   #76
LucasGtrGod
Wishes he was Mahler
 
LucasGtrGod's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Not in Perth
...straight away


Btw I can't be arsed writing anything more for this so I am just going to steal it from wikipedia.

The Classical Period (1750-1820)
The Classical period, from about 1750 – 1820, established many of the norms of composition, presentation and style, and was when the piano became the predominant keyboard instrument. The basic forces required for an orchestra became somewhat standardized (although they would grow as the potential of a wider array of instruments was developed in the following centuries). Chamber music grew to include ensembles with as many as 8-10 performers for serenades. Opera continued to develop, with regional styles in Italy, France, and German-speaking lands predominating. The opera buffa, or comic opera, gained in popularity. The symphony came into its own as a musical form, and the concerto was developed as a vehicle for displays of virtuoso playing skill. Orchestras no longer required a harpsichord (which had been part of the traditional continuo in the Baroque style), and were often led by the lead violinist (now called the concertmaster).

Wind instruments became more refined in the Classical period. While double reeded instruments like the oboe and bassoon became somewhat standardized in the Baroque, the clarinet family of single reeds did not receive wide use until Mozart expanded its role in orchestral, chamber, and concerto settings.

Select Composers
Early Beethoven
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Haydn
J.C. Bach


The Romantic Period (1820-1910) (my favourite period)
The music of the Romantic era, from 1820 – 1910, was characterized by increased attention to melody and rhythm, as well as expressive and emotional elements, paralleling romanticism in other art forms. Musical forms began to break from the Classical era forms (even as those were being codified), with free-form pieces with titles like nocturne, fantasia, and prelude being written, where accepted ideas about the exposition and development of themes were ignored or minimized. The music became more chromatic, dissonant, and tonally colorful, with tensions (with respect to accepted norms of the older forms) about key signatures increasing. The art song (or Lied) came to maturity in this era, as did the epic scales of grand opera, which culminated with Richard Wagner's Ring cycle.

In the 19th century, musical institutions were able to separate themselves from the control of wealthy patrons, as composers and musicians were able to construct lives independent of the whims of the sometimes fickle nobility. Increasing interest in music by the growing middle classes throughout western Europe spurred the creation of organizations for the teaching, performance, and preservation of music. The piano, which achieved its modern construction in this era, in part due to industrial advances in metallurgy, became widely popular with the middle class, whose demands for the instrument spurred a large number of piano builders. Most symphony orchestras with long histories date their founding to this era. Some musicians and composers were the stars of the day; some, like Franz Liszt and Niccolò Paganini, fulfilled both roles.

The family of instruments used, especially in orchestras, grew. A wider array of percussion instruments began to appear. Brass instruments took on larger roles, as the introduction of rotary valves made it possible for them to play a wider range of notes. The size of the orchestra (typically around 40 in the Classical era) grew to be over 100. Gustav Mahler's 1906 Symphony of a Thousand, for example, has been performed with over 150 instrumentalists and choirs over 400 strong.

The influence of the European musical ideas also began to spread beyond the boundaries of Europe, as European cultural ideas and institutions began to follow colonial expansion into other parts of the world. There was also a rise within Europe, especially toward the end of the era, of nationalism in music (echoing, in some cases, political sentiments of the time), as composers such as Edvard Grieg, Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov, and Antonín Dvořák echoed traditional music of their homelands in their compositions.

Select Composers:
Late Beethoven
Gustav Mahler
Richard Wagner
Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky
Paganini
Mendelssohn
Schubert

And then there is the modern period which has a lot of different ****, but from it I recommend:

Igor Stravinsky
Sergei Prokofiev
Dmitri Shostakovich

Last edited by LucasGtrGod : 06-29-2009 at 02:12 AM.
LucasGtrGod is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-28-2009, 11:57 PM   #77
The Kreator
Banned
 
The Kreator's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
I've been playing classical piano for 10 years...

My favorite to play is mainly either Beethoven or Mozart, although Lynyrd Skynyrd is fun
The Kreator is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-2009, 01:50 AM   #78
Shinozoku
UG Nerd
 
Shinozoku's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Cody's kitchen.
Assuming classical is the umbrella term, would Rachmaninoff count? Robert Schumann is amazing as well. I learned Rach's "Elegie" on piano at one point (tech as fvck in some parts), as well as Schumann's "Rhapsody," which one could say is similarly difficult.

I love me some occasional classical music
Quote:
Originally Posted by NosferatuZodd09
this one's definitely my favorite classical piece sadly the assholes never play the fugue either...

JS Bach's BWV 538 Toccata


it'd be nice if everyone put links to most of the other composers that arent... the most mainstream for us newbies... and to get some recommendations from here

You referring to this whole piece?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ipzR9bhei_o&feature=fvw
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by Me
Then there's this band called Slice The Cake...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Magero
Bunch of faggots putting random riffs together and calling it "progressive" deathcore.
Stupid name.
Probably picked "for teh lulz"

Mod in UG's Official Gain Whores

Last edited by Shinozoku : 06-29-2009 at 02:02 AM.
Shinozoku is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-2009, 02:03 AM   #79
LucasGtrGod
Wishes he was Mahler
 
LucasGtrGod's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Not in Perth
why wouldn't Rachmaninoff count as classical?

He is firmly positioned within 20th century Romantic composers, which last time I checked was classical.
LucasGtrGod is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-2009, 02:09 AM   #80
Psychopathology
high grade specialist
 
Psychopathology's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: MD
Quote:
Originally Posted by LucasGtrGod
The Romantic Period (1750-1820) (my favourite period)
The music of the Romantic era, from 1820 – 1910...

Typo?
Psychopathology is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 08:33 AM.

Forum Archives / About / Terms of Use / Advertise / Contact / Ultimate-Guitar.Com © 2014
Powered by: vBulletin Version 3.0.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.