Go Back   UG Community @ Ultimate-Guitar.Com > Instruments > Electric Guitar
User Name  
Password
Search:

Reply
Old Yesterday, 05:18 PM   #1
lodgi
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Edge/Floyd Rose trem question

I have a newly puchased ibanez rg655 that has an original edge trem on it. This is my first floating bridge so I'm just learning about it.

I have set it up as all the vids and handbook have suggested and the knife edges are parrallel with the body. But i still seem to be going slightly out of tune when I do big trem pushes and pulls.

I just noticed that the side that has the lighter strings on, while parrallel to the body like the other side, is slightly lower into the body than the other side. I was messing with the trem posts when I set it up and may have not kept it level. Is this bad?

I was trying to get a low action.
lodgi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Yesterday, 05:27 PM   #2
T00DEEPBLUE
Freaky Alien Genotype
 
T00DEEPBLUE's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
It's quite normal for the treble side of the bridge to sit lower.

If you're still having a couple of tuning problems, it might help if you lubricate the knife edges.
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave Bonta
If you want to follow your gut, you must first acquire a gut.
T00DEEPBLUE is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Yesterday, 05:39 PM   #3
Way Cool JR.
The 'L80s Man.
 
Way Cool JR.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
It is ideal to keep both sides the same height on a Floyd Rose. This way the knife edges are level in the grooves of the posts. When you have both sides of the Floyd set at different heights, it changes the angle of the knife edges but the posts grooves stay level. So you end up having the knife edges sitting at an angle on the posts which can cause some tuning stability issues.

Everyone's always worried about the Floyd's being level with the body front to back, but fail to realize that it is also ideal to have it level left to right for best stability. This is at least what I have learned (through trial & error) over the decades of using these things.
Way Cool JR. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Yesterday, 07:15 PM   #4
rickyvanh
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2011
If you can live without being able to pull up on the bar, you can do what I just did, install a trem stopper ($25). With this thing, your bridge comes back and stops against it, and is in tune every time. It makes tuning way easier and more stable, it allows you to tune to drop d and back without adjusting the springs, and it allows you to take off all your strings and clean your fretboard. It's super easy to install, too. F-U Tone sells them.

Having the bridge floating requires very precise spring tension. It's doable, but time consuming. You really need to properly stretch new strings, or you will go nuts trying to get it in tune.

Last edited by rickyvanh : Yesterday at 07:31 PM. Reason: add text
rickyvanh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Yesterday, 11:15 PM   #5
Fastmerc
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
First put just a touch of chapstick on the knife edges, second on the inside of the trem posts you should have locking studs that you have to tighten down once you have them set. It is fairly normal to have the treble side just a hair lower than the bass side. The best resource for setting up an original edge to perfection is on the Ibanezrules.com tech section.
Fastmerc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Today, 11:23 AM   #6
Way Cool JR.
The 'L80s Man.
 
Way Cool JR.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fastmerc
First put just a touch of chapstick on the knife edges, second on the inside of the trem posts you should have locking studs that you have to tighten down once you have them set. It is fairly normal to have the treble side just a hair lower than the bass side. The best resource for setting up an original edge to perfection is on the Ibanezrules.com tech section.

Yeah it is normal to have it set higher/lower on one side, But
when it comes to a Floyd you want the base plate & pivot/action posts to be adjusted the same height on both sides. Then if you need the radius or action to be readjusted more precisely it's best to be done with saddle shims.

Most guitars with Fender style trems and Gibson style TOM's are different than a Floyd/Edge style trem when it comes to setting the action. A Fender style trem (vintage or 2 point) the base plate stays the same height on both sides and you adjust the action & radius with the saddles individually. And a TOM style bridge you can adjust the entire angle of the bridge to have it different on both sides.

With a Floyd you need to keep the base plate & studs the same height on both sides for it to perform at its best. You need to keep those knife edges riding as straight as you can on those post grooves. When you set both sides of the base plate at different heights you are changing the angle of the knife edges on the posts and hindering it's stability.

Lubing the knife edges like you mentioned is always a good idea.

Sorry for rambling, I'm not the best at explaining stuff. But I do know my way around a Floyd and how to keep it working at its best.

Last edited by Way Cool JR. : Today at 11:24 AM.
Way Cool JR. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Today, 04:06 PM   #7
lodgi
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Quote:
Originally Posted by Way Cool JR.
Yeah it is normal to have it set higher/lower on one side, But
when it comes to a Floyd you want the base plate & pivot/action posts to be adjusted the same height on both sides. Then if you need the radius or action to be readjusted more precisely it's best to be done with saddle shims.

Most guitars with Fender style trems and Gibson style TOM's are different than a Floyd/Edge style trem when it comes to setting the action. A Fender style trem (vintage or 2 point) the base plate stays the same height on both sides and you adjust the action & radius with the saddles individually. And a TOM style bridge you can adjust the entire angle of the bridge to have it different on both sides.

With a Floyd you need to keep the base plate & studs the same height on both sides for it to perform at its best. You need to keep those knife edges riding as straight as you can on those post grooves. When you set both sides of the base plate at different heights you are changing the angle of the knife edges on the posts and hindering it's stability.

Lubing the knife edges like you mentioned is always a good idea.

Sorry for rambling, I'm not the best at explaining stuff. But I do know my way around a Floyd and how to keep it working at its best.



Could you explain this please? What are saddle shims?
lodgi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Today, 06:22 PM   #8
T00DEEPBLUE
Freaky Alien Genotype
 
T00DEEPBLUE's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Quote:
Originally Posted by lodgi
Could you explain this please? What are saddle shims?

THey're metal plates that sit under the bridge saddles, which raise the height of the saddle up, so you can lower the bridge down on the base side, so you can lower it to the height of the treble side, theoretically.
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave Bonta
If you want to follow your gut, you must first acquire a gut.
T00DEEPBLUE is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 11:13 PM.

Forum Archives / About / Terms of Use / Advertise / Contact / Ultimate-Guitar.Com © 2014
Powered by: vBulletin Version 3.0.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.