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Old 10-06-2009, 07:53 AM   #41
axemanchris
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I won't suggest that your book is wrong, but I will suggest that your book seems to be serving a simplified purpose.

Note that:

Your soprano and tenor ranges both start on the same C's as mine do, but instead of going up two full octaves, they go up an octave and a fifth.

Your alto goes up to the same C5 that my tenor range does, but doesn't go as low. You could say it starts at the C5 and extends downwards an octave and a fourth.

In all cases so far, the most difficult few notes are left off, and the whole range of the voice is limited to an octave and a half.

Now the bass.... *just* shy of two octaves now. Lopped off the bottom three notes, and added two notes to the top.

I'm going to guess that this book you are referring to is geared towards younger choral singers. A choral tenor, for instance, is rarely expected to reach a high C, for instance. In fact, a choral tenor is rarely expected to exceed the G4 you listed - especially a beginner.

A younger bass singer may well not have developed his voice such that he can sing the low C, D, or E, and his voice might still be light enough to reach beyond the typical top C of a bass, and may well be able to reach the D and E above without difficulty.

The ranges I quoted are essentially the true operatic considerations for range. Many men who call themselves tenors cannot reach a high C.

.... and therein is another factor..... in choral music, things are typically written in SATB. Few people have the true full range of those parts. For instance, out of ten male singers, one will be a true bass, one will be a true tenor, and the other 8 will be baritones of varying colour. Now, in a choir, these 8 baritones will need to be 'fit' into either a bass or a tenor role - whichever they are closest to. Because of this, you can't generally ask a baritone to sing past the G4.... the same one you quoted as the top of the tenor range. No surprise, then, that choral music is written such that it expects that very few singers will be able to reach the true tenor C or soprano C, etc.

CT
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Old 10-06-2009, 02:44 PM   #42
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Originally Posted by axemanchris
@joel - Are you sure you're not singing an octave lower when you go up to the Ab? Could you post a recording?

I'm positive the Ab is higher than middle C- I usually sing while playing the piano, so its a bit easier to tell.
I won't be able to get a recording, not anytime soon though- I'll see when I can get one up. But the Ab is only in one song, and even then, its actually a bit past where my voice should go comfortably (I feel a bit of strain, nothing too major else I wouldn't do it, but its still a bit stressful).

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Old 10-06-2009, 07:38 PM   #43
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I can hit the G# note on the E string (4th fret) and the D note on the G string (7th fret), after that I'd need to go into falsetto to get higher.

What am I considered?

Baritone?
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Old 10-06-2009, 11:06 PM   #44
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Originally Posted by axemanchris
I won't suggest that your book is wrong, but I will suggest that your book seems to be serving a simplified purpose.

Note that:

Your soprano and tenor ranges both start on the same C's as mine do, but instead of going up two full octaves, they go up an octave and a fifth.

Your alto goes up to the same C5 that my tenor range does, but doesn't go as low. You could say it starts at the C5 and extends downwards an octave and a fourth.

In all cases so far, the most difficult few notes are left off, and the whole range of the voice is limited to an octave and a half.

Now the bass.... *just* shy of two octaves now. Lopped off the bottom three notes, and added two notes to the top.

I'm going to guess that this book you are referring to is geared towards younger choral singers. A choral tenor, for instance, is rarely expected to reach a high C, for instance. In fact, a choral tenor is rarely expected to exceed the G4 you listed - especially a beginner.

A younger bass singer may well not have developed his voice such that he can sing the low C, D, or E, and his voice might still be light enough to reach beyond the typical top C of a bass, and may well be able to reach the D and E above without difficulty.

The ranges I quoted are essentially the true operatic considerations for range. Many men who call themselves tenors cannot reach a high C.

.... and therein is another factor..... in choral music, things are typically written in SATB. Few people have the true full range of those parts. For instance, out of ten male singers, one will be a true bass, one will be a true tenor, and the other 8 will be baritones of varying colour. Now, in a choir, these 8 baritones will need to be 'fit' into either a bass or a tenor role - whichever they are closest to. Because of this, you can't generally ask a baritone to sing past the G4.... the same one you quoted as the top of the tenor range. No surprise, then, that choral music is written such that it expects that very few singers will be able to reach the true tenor C or soprano C, etc.

CT

It's a chapter on Four Part Vocal Harmonies in a music theory book.
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Old 10-07-2009, 12:57 AM   #45
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i can go from about middle C, with full voice, but i have to concentrate on relaxing the throat to sing it, to about a full octave and a half behind that to the low A, is this baritone then?
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Old 10-09-2009, 09:04 PM   #46
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ok, well actually i just found mixed voice and now i can sing the tenor range, an octave above and below middle c on a keyboard. but for some reason i doubt im a tenor, so does a mixed head/chest voice count?
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Old 10-10-2009, 12:31 PM   #47
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i can hit 2 octaves below middle C, and can hit E above high C
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Old 10-10-2009, 12:54 PM   #48
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Originally Posted by guitar351
i can hit 2 octaves below middle C, and can hit E above high C


Pretty sure you're using falsetto to get to that E... youre 'range' doesnt include falsetto sorry. If you can hit that very low C i would have thought you were a bass but feel free to correct me..
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Old 10-11-2009, 10:06 PM   #49
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Is the bottom of one's range considered the lowest note that they can physically hit, or the lowest note that they can hit clearly, without losing volume dramatically?

Also, can it be physically harmful to sing in a very high falsetto frequently? I sing quite high when I'm just messing around occasionally, and I don't want to damage my voice.
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Old 10-11-2009, 10:38 PM   #50
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Butt Rayge
It's a chapter on Four Part Vocal Harmonies in a music theory book.


Okay.... the guidelines are probably there to teach people to write parts that will be 'safe' for most people typically in those roles. It makes sense in that light.

CT
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Old 10-11-2009, 10:39 PM   #51
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Originally Posted by yabes24
does a mixed head/chest voice count?


It's the *only* thing that counts.

CT
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Old 10-11-2009, 10:43 PM   #52
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Originally Posted by metallifan3091
Is the bottom of one's range considered the lowest note that they can physically hit, or the lowest note that they can hit clearly, without losing volume dramatically?


I guess here you have 'technical' range and 'practical' range. Most people consider the 'practical' range the most accurate. I can hit a high B (*just* shy of tenor high C), but I can only sing it sometimes. If I advertised my range as going up to the high B, and someone hired me as a singer based on that range, they would be pretty p!ssed that I misrepresented myself. I mean, really, who cares if you can only sort of hit the note? People care that you can *really* hit the note, and do so with reliability and consistency.

Quote:
Originally Posted by metallifan3091
Also, can it be physically harmful to sing in a very high falsetto frequently?


Yes.

CT
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Old 10-11-2009, 10:49 PM   #53
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Can you elaborate some about the falsetto thing? If it doesn't feel like there is any straining or pain or discomfort, should I still be worried about doing damage, or is that safe?
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Old 10-13-2009, 07:31 AM   #54
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Originally Posted by axemanchris
Okay.... the guidelines are probably there to teach people to write parts that will be 'safe' for most people typically in those roles. It makes sense in that light.

CT

Yes, I'd say so.

I wasn't aware that the full operatic range was two octaves. The book doesn't say whether or not it demonstrates the full range, so I assumed that it did.

Probably a flaw on both mine and the author/publishers part.
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Old 10-13-2009, 02:22 PM   #55
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I know that when I took music theory, in the voice writing part for SATB, they had the ranges listed as smaller than the professional ranges typically are, because many SATB singers don't have the full range, so, as a composer, that has to be considered, unless you only compose for professional ensembles.
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Old 10-15-2009, 04:27 PM   #56
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Could anyone write a list of rock/metal/pop (stuff that most people in this website would want to sing, that is) singers, according to what range are they? Personally I'm looking for Baritone singers to try and cover, but I guess this could help everyone. (I assume this fits in this thread, if not... well, do whatever you gotta do)
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Old 10-16-2009, 07:25 AM   #57
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My vocal range is D# below middle C - F#(F# above the F# that's above middle C)
What would be best to try and improve on this range?
EGGEDIT: The chorus from 'Sulfer' by Slipknot is probably the highest I can reach on a good day
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Old 10-16-2009, 09:33 AM   #58
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Originally Posted by Rubys
Could anyone write a list of rock/metal/pop (stuff that most people in this website would want to sing, that is) singers, according to what range are they? Personally I'm looking for Baritone singers to try and cover, but I guess this could help everyone. (I assume this fits in this thread, if not... well, do whatever you gotta do)


Hey mate. That sounds like a good idea. I did a quick google for ya and got this list of baritone singers from wikipedia;


AL

* Phil Anselmo
* David Bowie
* Pete Burns
* Johnny Cash
* Nick Cave
* Jarvis Cocker
* Leonard Cohen
* Nat King Cole
* Bing Crosby
* Tim Curry
* Ian Curtis
* Neil Diamond
* Dave Gahan
* Al Green
* Jimi Hendrix
* Tom Jones
* Mark Lanegan

MZ

* Dean Martin
* Michael McDonald
* Tom Morello (As The Nightwatchman)
* Jim Morrison
* Billy Ocean
* Robert Palmer
* Elvis Presley
* David Lee Roth
* Frank Sinatra
* Bruce Springsteen
* Ringo Starr
* Michael Stipe
* Joe Strummer
* Levi Stubbs
* Corey Taylor
* Rob Thomas
* Ville Valo
* Eddie Vedder
* Vladimir Vysotsky
* Scott Weiland
* Paul Williams
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Old 10-16-2009, 09:55 PM   #59
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Originally Posted by AlanHB
Hey mate. That sounds like a good idea. I did a quick google for ya and got this list of baritone singers from wikipedia;


AL

* Phil Anselmo
* David Bowie
* Pete Burns
* Johnny Cash
* Nick Cave
* Jarvis Cocker
* Leonard Cohen
* Nat King Cole
* Bing Crosby
* Tim Curry
* Ian Curtis
* Neil Diamond
* Dave Gahan
* Al Green
* Jimi Hendrix
* Tom Jones
* Mark Lanegan

MZ

* Dean Martin
* Michael McDonald
* Tom Morello (As The Nightwatchman)
* Jim Morrison
* Billy Ocean
* Robert Palmer
* Elvis Presley
* David Lee Roth
* Frank Sinatra
* Bruce Springsteen
* Ringo Starr
* Michael Stipe
* Joe Strummer
* Levi Stubbs
* Corey Taylor
* Rob Thomas
* Ville Valo
* Eddie Vedder
* Vladimir Vysotsky
* Scott Weiland
* Paul Williams

Could have sworn I googled that O_O thanks
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Old 10-17-2009, 06:27 PM   #60
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i can hit a low E clearly, and i can go to the B below middle C clearly. but the instant i hit middle c, my voice strains. this would make me a bass right?
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