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Old 11-30-2014, 09:01 PM   #1
jonahcraker12
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Secondary tones

So, in my lessons I have been trans-moding various solos. The exercise is to take the defining tones and replace them with a primary or secondary tone of that mode. I noticed that some of the secondary tones were a fifth away from the primary tone, and some are a third away.

ie----->D Dorian's secondary is A
C Ionian's secondary is E

I was wondering what the reason for that is. What makes something a secondary tone of a mode? Was it a mistake?
Thanks
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Old 11-30-2014, 10:45 PM   #2
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Sorry man I have no idea what you're talking about. Maybe your teacher has a specific methodology that works for them?? I don't know. Your best bet would probably be to ask him/her.

If we were using chord tones then perhaps the primary tone is the root note and the secondary tones are the other chord tones (which would be the third and fifth above the root). Thus the "secondary tones" would be either the third or the fifth and that exercise just happens to use the fifth above the D and the third above the C but could also have used the fifth above the C or the third above the D.

But I'm just guessing here, like I said, I have no idea what you're talking about.
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Old 12-01-2014, 01:53 AM   #3
jonahcraker12
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Yeah, I had a feeling that might be the case...Thanks, now I know that it's probably just how he teaches it at first.
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Old 12-01-2014, 03:57 AM   #4
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try hard... dude...
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Old 12-01-2014, 08:36 AM   #5
jerrykramskoy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jonahcraker12
So, in my lessons I have been trans-moding various solos. The exercise is to take the defining tones and replace them with a primary or secondary tone of that mode. I noticed that some of the secondary tones were a fifth away from the primary tone, and some are a third away.

ie----->D Dorian's secondary is A
C Ionian's secondary is E

I was wondering what the reason for that is. What makes something a secondary tone of a mode? Was it a mistake?
Thanks


Not sure on terminology above. But the tonic triad for a given scale (I use this generally, to include modes) provide the most important pitches for establishing tonality, and the remaining scale notes are secondary to these, and each scale does have a particular scale note that brings out that scale's sound.

So in Dorian, 1, b3 and 5 are the primary intervals. 2, 4, 6 and b7 the secondary ones, and 6 is the interval that differentiates Dorian.

Is this what you're referring to?

cheers, Jerry
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Old 12-01-2014, 08:44 AM   #6
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Whatever system you're using is non-standard terminology. You'd have to go back to the originator of that terminology.

Be careful with learning this way. Unless your teacher has worked this out very thoroughly you'll end up knowing a lot of jargon that's meaningless to anyone who hasn't been taught by him.
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